Baltimore & Ohio / Baltimore & Ohio Chicago Terminal / Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern / Buffalo & Susquehanna / Buffalo, Rochester, & Pittsburgh / Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton / Cincinnati, Indianapolis, & Western / Cleveland Terminal & Valley / Cleveland, Delphos & St Louis / Cleveland, Lorain, & Wheeling / Coal & Coke / Dayton & Union / Monongahela River / Morgantown & Kingwood / Ohio & Mississippi / Ohio River / Pittsburgh & Connellsville / Pittsburgh & Western / Pittsburgh, Akron, & Western / Pittsburgh, Cleveland & Toledo / Staten Island Rapid Transit / Valley Railway / Zanesville & Ohio River 4-4-0 "American" Locomotives of the USA


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class 17/H-12 (Locobase 2105)

Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964) and from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 27, p. 238. Works numbers were 26091, 26096 in July 1905.

Uncomplicated Eight-wheeler operated by the Coal & Coke on the passenger service it opened on 21 January 1906.


Class 20 / G-14 (Locobase 2092)

Data from Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964) and Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines, as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Volume 12, p. 91.

The 75-mile-long VR ran this Eight-wheeler of small dimensions and relatively light weight even after the B & O assumed control in January 1890. The VR was combined with the B & O's terminal operations in Cleveland in 1895. The B & O renumbered the 20 as 628 at some point, but the parent did not take full control of the CT & V until 1915, after the 628 had been retired.

. Engine weight later shown as 83,000 lb.


Class 20/M-3 (Locobase 2106)

Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964).; data from Baltimore & Ohio Steam and Electric Locomotive Diagrams by Alvin Staufer (self-published in 1964), supplied by Allen Stanley in May 2005 from his extensive Raildata collection; and Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 28, p. 244. See also the online West Virginia Encyclopedia entry on the Coal & Coke by Donald L Rice at http://www.wvencyclopedia.org/articles/1337 . Works numbers were 27449, 27464 in February 1906 and 38052 in July 1912.

A coal road serving mines in the West Virginia mountains needed passenger engines to serve local communities and to transport miners to and from the mines. This pair came in 1906 to pull the Elkins-Charleston trains that ran along the backbone of the C&C.

Firebox heating surface area later increased to 175 sq ft (16.26 sq m).

They were retired in 1936.


Class 22/M-4 (Locobase 13904)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 41, p. 97. Works number was 38052 in July 1912.

Similar in power and slightly smaller in size, the 22 joined its Baldwin stablemates in 1912. Unlike those two engines, however, the later engine use Baker-Pilliod outside radial valve gear in place of the link motion in the earlier locomotives.

After the Baltimore & Ohio took over the C & C in 1918, the 22, now renumbered 864, occupied its own class and operated until 1934.


Class 32 (Locobase 2546)

Data from "Fuel for Railroads", William Jenney (ed.), The Mining Magazine and Journal, Vol Six, (January 1856) p. 64-66. See Locobase 11176 for a discussion of "the value and importance of coal as an article of fuel." His discussion of the substitution of coal for wood included communications from several locomotive superintendents describing various tests by different railroads in 1855. See also Locobases 5570 and 11176 for other early comments on the preference for coal as fuel.

Locobase suspects that this was one of five 4-4-0s built by Ross Winans. White (1968) shows two views, one after the 1856 rebuild, which added a cab, splashers, cow catcher, bell, and the replacement of a trombone-like stack with an enormous cabbage stack. Also, the inside valve motion was changed to a link-type motion.

In addition to the reports of usage, the commentary includes some very useful conversion data for different kinds of wood and the water they can evaporate. The Boston & Maine's McClellan (no further ID) said:

"These experiments were conducted in the winter season, and the track was more or less obstructed by snow and ice, giving a very unfavorable state of the rail.

1 cord of beech evaporates 1,621 gallons water.

1 cord of spruce evaporates 1,200 gallons water

1 cord of hemlock 1,028 gallons water.

1 cord of pitch-pine 994 gallons water.

1 cord of white-pine 906 gallons water.

Cotton-wood can bo used, but is one of the least valuable species of timber, as a steam-generator per pound; and its specific gravity is very low.

The result of a year's work on the Central road of Georgia, shows that one cord of wood was used for every sixty-six and four tenths miles on the road.

As pine wood is corded on the tender, one cubic foot will evaporate one cubic foot (7.48 gallons, or 62.5 pounds) of water.

One cord Southern pine weighs 3,180 pounds.

One cord common dry pine weighs 2,610 pounds.

For passenger trains the water stations are usually about 25 miles [40 km] apart.

For freight trains, 12 to 15 miles is found convenient distance for replenishing the supply.

Over ordinary grades, say 30 feet to 40 feet, there would be no difficulty in carrying water and fuel for 108 miles [187 km], either by using additional tenders, or large ones made for the especial case, or tanks; the weight, &c, of these being given, it becomes a simple matter of calculating the extra weight to be drawn in any given case."


Class 36 (Locobase 9603)

Data from John W Hill, ME, "Tests of a Baldwin Locomotive," Journal of the Franklin Institute in April-May 1879 (Pergamon Press, 1879), pp. 255-272, 294-308. See also DeGolyer, Volume 6, p. 191. Works numbers for this pair were 3023 and 3025, which were produced in December 1872.

When ordered, the boilers had a standard count of 144 2" tubes, each of which was 11 feet long.

This detailed test report opens the window to a fascinating view of the state of performance evaluation in the late 1870s. Hill payed particular attention to the performance of the grate, the firebox, and the boiler as a whole. He took up the question of just how much of total evaporation can be said to come from firebox heating surface and how much from the tubes. He also discussed the amount of unburnt coal likely to be expelled during a run (it ranged, he believed, from 5% to 10%).

Hills' conclusion (pp. 299-300) took dead aim at the inefficiencies in contemporary American practice: "Assuming the Baldwin Locomotive as representing the best American practice, then two serious defects arc apparent from these trials:

"First. The economy of boiler should be improved until an average evaporation is had, [sic] of nine pounds of steam from temperature of feed. per pound of coal. This evaporation is attainable without impairing the steaming qualities of the boiler.

"Second. The valve gear should be so devised as to produce full port-opening for all cut-offs, and the area of port-opening should be calculated for maximum piston speed. It is just as desirable that the initial pressure in the cylinders of a locomotive shall approximate boiler pressure as in the automatic cut-off engine, and this result also is attainable without complicating the valve gear or diminishing the pronounced efficiency of the engine."

Locobase notes that a standing requirement for Baldwin's Walschaert gear installation in later years included very similar instructions.


Class 762 (Locobase 1438)

Data from Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964) and Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines, as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Volume 13, p. 61. Works numbers were 8072-8073 in August 1886.

When delivered, they had 69" drivers and they retained their Wooten fireboxes. 762 suffered a boiler explosion in 1886, but 763 survived to be modified in the B & O's Mt Clare shops in 1906. Now rolling on 54" drivers, the engine assigned to the Staten Island Rapid Transit line and designated #5.


Class 848 (Locobase 10804)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 15, p. 134. See also "Baldwin Compound Locomotive", Engineering News, Volume 23 (3 May 1890), pp. 424- 42 and "Tests of the Baldwin Compound Locomotive," Engineering News, Volume 24 (6 September 1890), p. 216; and Arthur T Woods, Compound Locomotives (New York: R M Van Arsdale, 1891), pp. 157-162 (His data differ slightly and Locobase opts for the builder's specs.). Works number was 10320 in October 1889.

This was the very first Vauclain compound to go into revenue service; it was identical to the I-5s shown in Locobase 11635 apart from its cylinder layout. Instead of two simple-expansion cylinder flanking the smokebox, the Vauclain compound had a high-pressure and a low-pressure cylinder cast as a unit. The locomotive had two of these, one on either side of the smokebox.

Each was served by a common piston valve (in this case, the valve measured 9"/229 mm in diameter) and both pistons in a unit drove on the same crosshead. An interesting note from the EN report of 3 May 1890 states that the "designer" of the valve (presumably Vauclain) described the assembly as "composed of two ordinary slide valves, one within the other." The outer slide supplied the HP cylinders, the inner slide conveying the exhausted high-pressure steam to the LP steam port.

Figure 2 on p. 242 shows a cylinder with circumferential rows of slots from one end to the other. At each end, the slots admit steam from the boiler. Between these two set of slots, along the cylinder (from left to right on the drawing)were ports for steam coming from the HP cylinder, then from the LP cylinder, a broad band for steam to the exhaust nozzle, then slots admitting steam to the LP cylinder, and steam to the HP cylinder.

Initial testing on the B&O and reported in September 1890 suggested that, when compared with an identical engine with simple-expansion cylinders, the principal advantage in using the Vauclain compound lay in its lower consumption of both coal and water. The biggest difference from a similar simple-expansion engine was expected to occur when operating the locomotive in "accommodation service", that is passenger trains making frequent stops or in freight service, where the difference might reach 30%. Savings in fast express service, the report added, would be compromised by the "greater frictional resistance which the steam encounters in passing through the various ports leading in and from the cylinders."

Later mechanics would comment that the common drive was a weak point because if the force generated by the different-sized pistons varied by much, the thrust wouldn't be true and the drive train would be wracked.

Unusually for a post-Civil War American locomotive, this demonstrator was painted blue.

Interestingly, although the Vauclain compound went on to be procured in relatively large numbers, this was the only B & O of that design and it was very quickly converted to a simple-expansion I-5 engine by 1891.


Class B-28 (Locobase 1447)

Given the number, this may have been the first engine on the MRRR. She obviously ran on light track and probably not to very demanding schedules. She was retired by 1912. See Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964)..


Class C (Locobase 1072)

Data from the 1924 TH & B Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 27, p. 257. And see the ever-reliable Western New York Railroads website -- http://wnyrails.org/railroads/bs/bs_home.htm -- for a description of this line. (Thanks to Chris Hohl for his 4 November 2016 email providing previously missing information about the tender's fuel and water capacities.) Works numbers were 25666 and 2568 in May 1905..

The B & S had a short life. After several years of construction and consolidation, the B & S had 37 miles in operation in 1896. As the Goodyears' fortunes grew, so did the railway and a big building push saw the line reach Buffalo in 1906. Alas, B & S declined even more rapidly. By 1910 it had entered receivership and by 1913, New York Supreme Court Justice HP Bissel determined that the 90 miles between Buffalo and Wellsville suffered from such a lack of traffic meant that it should simply be torn up -rails,ties,and all.

The locomotives found new homes on the Toronto, Hamilton & Buffalo in 1917. The third locomotive had 73" drivers and is described in Locobase 12773.


Class C / G-9 (Locobase 2006)

ORRR's Class C, delivered from 1883 to 1888.

Builder info from B.Rumary, 25 Kingscombe, Gurney Slade, Radstock, BA3 4TH, ENGLAND and Jeremy Lambert as supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004.

Works #969 in October 1883, B&O 619

977-980 in December 1883, dropped by 1901

1055 in November 1884, B&O 623

1140-1141 September 1886, B&O 646, 661

1164-1165, 1171-1172 December 1886,

B&O 663, 643-645

1273 in September 1887, B&O 653

1311-1313 in December 1887, B&O 651-2, 654.

The last of this subclass ran until 1912. See Sagle, 1964 for details.


Class Class 6-16 (Locobase 2039)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Volume 19, p. 125. Works numbers were 14177-14178 in December 1894.

The Z & OR, which ran 72 miles from Fair Oaks to West Marietta, Ohio, went into receivership at almost the same time they took delivery of these two Eight-wheelers. The state of limbo lasted until 1 March 1900 when it was taken over by the Ohio & Little Kanawha. The B&O took control in June 1909.

These two engines show an interesting combination of relatively small cylinders for the 1890s, but a competitive boiler pressure. These two engines became B&O Class 6-16, 656, 660. Retired by 1913.


Class Class B (Locobase 2023)

Sagle 1964.

Builder information from B Rumary list supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004. Works number was 579 (May 1882). Renumbere 4 by the P & W.

The CD&St L was soon taken over by the Pittsburgh and Western. The latter was a collection of narrow-auge lines that were gradually converted to standard gauge over a couple of decades beginning in 1883 with the main line and end with the Foxburg-Mt Jewett, PA branch in 1911.

The Baltimore & Ohio gained control of the P&W in 1902 to help it reach westward from Pittsburgh. At that time, this engine became the single-unit class F-N (#94) until it retired in 1911.


Class Class E/H-8 (Locobase 2016)

Data from B&OSW 10-1901 Description of Locomotives supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Built by the O&M in 1884-1886. The O&M was absorbed by the Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern (B&OSW) in 1893, 11 years after the B&O had gained stock control of the B&OSW. These O&M engines -- part of a confusing series of very similar engines -- were reclassified H-8 on the B&O in 1900 and ran until 1919. See Sagle, 1964 for details.


Class Class P (Locobase 2035)

Small Pittsburgh and Western American that became B&O Class G-13, 664. Production date is an estimate.

Sagle 1964.


Class Class R (Locobase 2036)

Became B&O Class H-7, 712, 707, 715

Sagle 1964.

Builder information from B Rumary list supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004. Works numbers were 691-693 (February 1884). Soon moved to Pittsburgh & Western as #258-260


Class Class S (Locobase 2037)

Sagle 1964.

Builder information from B Rumary list supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004. Works numbers were 759-760 (July 1885) and 764-767 (February 1886, November 1885, and June 1886 (2), respectively). The class was later renumbered 262-267. Three -- 262, 264, 265 -- were taken into the B&O as 717, 713, and 721 in class H-7a.

Works #823, for the Pittsburgh, Painesville & Fairport, was probably from the same class because it was grouped with the P&W locomotives in the same class.


Class Class T (Locobase 2038)

Data from "Pittsburg & Western Passenger Locomotives," The Railway Age, Vol (1 September 1899), p. 647. Works numbers were 1964-1965 in June 1899.

Much bigger P&W Americans that are representative of the arrangement at the turn of the 20th Century. After their introduction, the P & W's master mechanic F T Hyndman claimed these engines were averaging 8,000 miles per month each on the Pittsburgh-Akron run.

Became B&O Class M odd, 1448-1449. Retired by 1912.

Sagle 1964.


Class D / G-18 (Locobase 9600)

Data from B&OSW 10-1901 Description of Locomotives supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection and Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle

Thank goodness for the detailed history of locomotive classes in Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power, 1964. The authors manage to make sense out of a densely complicated motive-power inheritance. Combining it with the Description of Locomotives reveals that this small class of engines was a mid-1880s set of Eight-wheelers originally intended to run on the Cincinnati-St Louis mainline of the 6-foot-gauge O & M.

600 had 67" drivers, the others had the 63" drivers shown in the specifications.


Class D / G-18 (Locobase 9601)

Data from B&OSW 10-1901 Description of Locomotives supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection and Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964).

This was an early O & M Eight-wheeler apparently built by the railway, although Sagle & Staufer have their doubts. It was a pretty average 4-4-0 for its time.


Class D / G-18 (Locobase 9602)

Data from B&OSW 10-1901 Description of Locomotives supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection and Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964).

Locobase isn't sure he's read the date correctly, although many of the specifications support an original construction date of 1867. The three locomotives differed in details from each other. The data shown represent 610 as shown in 1901.


Class Director General (Locobase 11182)

Data from Exhibit of Locomotives by the Baldwin Locomotive Works (Philadelphia: J B Lippincott, 1893), pp. 68-72. See also DeGolyer, Volume 18, p. 184. Works number was 13420 in May 1893.

A showpiece for the 1893 Columbian Exhibition in Chicago, this was one of only two B&O 4-4-0s to be delivered as compounds. As in other Vauclain compounds, each set of two cylinders shared a 10 1/2" (267 mm) diameter piston valve

859 was rebuilt in 1905 as a standard M-1 with 20"x 24" (508 x 610 mm) cylinders and 62" (1,575 mm) drivers. Although it was retired in December 1925, 859 wasn't scrapped until 1942.


Class E / H-8 (Locobase 9597)

Data from B&OSW 10-1901 Description of Locomotives supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Built by the O&M in 1888. These were mixed-traffic versions of a common design buil in the O & M's own shops. They were later taken into the Baltimore & Ohio SouthWestern.

Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964) are certainly correct when he comments on the tangle of specifications and numbers represented by the O & M Eight-wheelers. Locobase has determined that there were essentially three designs, of which this was the one with 226 tubes and 63" drivers. See Locobase 9599 for the slightly smaller stablemates.


Class E / H-8 (Locobase 9598)

Data from B&OSW 10-1901 Description of Locomotives supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Built by the O&M in 1890. These were mixed-traffic versions of a common design buil in the O & M's own shops. They were later taken into the Baltimore & Ohio SouthWestern


Class E / H-8 (Locobase 9599)

Data from B&OSW 10-1901 Description of Locomotives supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Although virtually identical to the engines shown in Locobase 9597, these had 8 fewer tubes and the larger firebox shown in Locobase 9598.


Class E/H-9/H-9-72 (Locobase 2017)

Builder info from B.Rumary, 25 Kingscombe, Gurney Slade, Radstock, BA3 4TH, ENGLAND and Jeremy Lambert as supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004. Works #1611-15, produced in January 1890. Data from B & OSW diagram book dated July 1900 supplied by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection May 2005.

Locobase loves to report on the convolutions of railroad ownership from time to time. According to http://www.scripophily.net/ciwaandbarac.html (viewed 30 July 2004), a website specializing in the sale of vintage stock certificates:

"The Scioto and Hocking Valley came under control of the Marietta & Cincinnati Railroad, which the B&O acquired in 1882 and changed the name of the company to the Cincinnati, Washington & Baltimore Railroad. In December 1889, this company ultimately became the B&O Southwestern Railroad, which portions of are still in existence as the Great Miami & Scioto Railroad and CSX Transportation."

These locomotives were ordered as the CW & B 1-5. Almost immediately, however, they became the B & OSW 131-135. The B & O renumbered them in 1902.

Four of the five engines in this class had 67" drivers, the fifth (132) had 73" drivers that reduced tractive effort to 14,486 lb.

Reclassified H-9 on the B&O in 1902. The first to be scrapped was the oddball with the 73" drivers in 1906. The others followed in 1917, 1923, 1920, and 1918, respectively.

See Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964) for details.


Class F (Locobase 1439)

Remained in SIRT service until 1910. Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964) and from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Volume 18, p. 33. Works number was 12889 in August 1889.

The 6 left the SIRT for Georgia Car & Locomotive as #125. In March 1912, the GC & L sold the engine to the Alabama, Tennessee & Northern as their 92. It apparently ended its career working for Hall Parker Construction, where it was numbered 196.


Class F (Locobase 1440)

A veritable class of locomotives on the SIRT. These engines, fitted with the wide anthracite-burning Wooten fireboxes, served until 1934. Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964).


Class F (Locobase 1441)

Akin to the F-class engines from Cooke (1906), these engines featured a higher boiler pressure. The four locomotives, fitted with the wide anthracite-burning Wooten fireboxes, served on SIRT only until 1928. Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964).


Class G (Locobase 1230)

Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964).

Relative lightweights built in 1870 (319-321, 323-324, 400-405), 1873 (207), and 1882 (267).


Class G (Locobase 1437)

Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964). gives no explanation for the greatly reduced power dimensions compared to the earlier H class, but the engine only lasted 8 years in SIRT service.


Class G (Locobase 2115)

Dayton & Union Railroad American engine. Not renumbered by B&O and retired by 1928. Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964).


Class G-1/G-2 (Locobase 1231)

Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964).

G-1s and G-2s had identical cylinder and driver dimensions, but Sagle doesn't give the G-1's boiler pressure. It may not have been the same as the G-2s -- the different retirement dates (G-1 in 1904, G-2 in 1916) suggest less power on the G-1.

G-1 class (501, 502, 508, 511-514, 519, 536-539, 543) all built in 1874 for the Central Ohio RR. G-1 523 and G-2s 524 & 538 built in 1875, 200 (G-1) followed in 1880 and 617 (G-2) in 1884.


Class G-10 (Locobase 2007)

Heavier subclass of the ORRR's Class C. See Sagle, 1964 for details.

Builder information from B Rumary list supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004. Works numbers were 1564-1566 (December 1899). All retired by 1923.


Class G-11 (Locobase 2008)

Single member of subclass of the ORRR's Class C.

Builder info from B.Rumary, 25 Kingscombe, Gurney Slade, Radstock, BA3 4TH, ENGLAND and Jeremy Lambert as supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004.Works #2528 in March 1895.

See Sagle, 1964 for details.


Class G-15 (Locobase 2093)

Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964).

Builder information from B Rumary list supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004. Works number was 1293 (January 1892). The PA & W later became the Northern Ohio and then the Akron, Canton & Youngstown. Meanwhile, the 28 moved to the Valley Railroad, which became the Cleveland Terminal & Valley Railroad. Ultimately, the Baltimore & Ohio took over the line and renumbered this locomotive 629 morphed into the Valley Railroad (B&O-controlled by 1890), which became the Cleveland Terminal & Valley Railroad. The Baltimore & Ohio took over the line in 1915 and renumbered this locomotive 629. It was off the roster by 1920.


Class G-17 (Locobase 2100)

Small Baltimore & Ohio Chicago Terminal American class of at least 10 locomotives. Out of service by 1924. Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964).


Class G-18 (Locobase 2113)

Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964).; data from 1954 Baltimore & Ohio Steam and Electric Locomotive Diagrams supplied by Allen Stanley in May 2005 from his extensive Raildata collection. Works number was 23201 in November 1903.

M&K American that was later renumbered 630 , later 834 (1928) and ran until 1936.


Class G-3 (Locobase 1228)

Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964).

G-4 was 296, built in 1867 with 69" drivers and commensurately lower tractive effort of 11,108 lb. Engine weight was 80,700 lb. A second group of G-4s followed in 1870 (322), 295 (1873), and 296 (again) in 1875.


Class G-3 (Locobase 1232)

Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964).

Another set of lightweights. 239, 240, and 318 delivered in 1870, 127 in 1874. All retired by 1912.


Class G-6 (Locobase 1229)

Retired by 1912. (Sagle, 1964)

Builder information from B Rumary list supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004. Works number was 13 (December 1867).


Class H (Locobase 1233)

Represents the H and H-1s built by the B&O in 1873-1875, for the most part. 7 H and 2 H/105 deliverd with 160 psi boilers, 21 Hs and 13 H-1s with 130 psi. Many were reboilered later with 160-psi boilers. All retired by 1913. See Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964). for details.

EHS, grate area, and weights from tables put up by Dr. Jonathan Smith --http://www.math.iastate.edu/jdhsmith/term/slusbo.htm (July 2002)


Class H (Locobase 2116)

Builder information from B Rumary list supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004. Works number was 1634 (May 1896). It differed from #63 of two years earlier in its higher boiler pressure and taller drivers.

Not renumbered by B&O and retired in 1927. Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964).


Class H (Locobase 2118)

Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964).

Builder information from B Rumary list supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004. Works number was 1538 (October 1894).

The D&U (aka the Bee Line) was controlled by the Baltimore & Ohio.This locomotive remained in service until 1921.


Class H odd (Locobase 2094)

Cleveland Terminal & Valley Railroad American for light service, apparently, given the relatively diminutive dimensions.

Renumbered 729 on the B&O sometime before 1907. Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964).

Builder info from B.Rumary, 25 Kingscombe, Gurney Slade, Radstock, BA3 4TH, ENGLAND and Jeremy Lambert as supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004. Works #1075, produced in 1885.


Class H-10 (Locobase 2052)

Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964).

Cincinnati, Hamilton, & Dayton American engines that were selectively renumbered by the B&O. 200-201 became 712-713, 205 (714), and 209 (715).


Class H-11 (Locobase 2155)

Data from Catalogue Descriptive of Simple and Compound Locomotives built by Brooks Locomotive Works, Dunkirk, NY (Buffalo, NY: Matthew-Northrup Company, 1899). Works number was 2265 in April 1893.

Builder info from B.Rumary, 25 Kingscombe, Gurney Slade, Radstock, BA3 4TH, ENGLAND and Jeremy Lambert as supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004.

This Eight-wheeler, exhibited at the Columbia Exposition in Chicago, was a one-of-a-kind and the only 4-4-0 Brooks supplied to the CH&D..Boiler was Improved Belpaire type, firebox had 19 sq ft (1.75 sq m) of arch pipes.

The locomotive was retired after a 30-year career in May 1923.


Class H-12 (Locobase 2054)

Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964).

Builder information from B Rumary list supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004. Works numbers were 1999-2000 (September 1899). These moved to the Cincinnati, Indianapolis & Western in 1916 as 156-157. They were both scrapped by 1925.


Class H-2/H-3 (Locobase 1235)

Three engines, each delivered with a different boiler psi (274 - 135 psi, 276 - 130 psi, 283 - 140). See Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964) for details.


Class H-5 (Locobase 1237)

Low-drivered batch, one of the largest "off-road" orders for the B&O during that time. See Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964) for details; data from Baltimore & Ohio Steam and Electric Locomotive Diagrams by Alvin Staufer (self-published in 1964), supplied by Allen Stanley in May 2005 from his extensive Raildata collection.

Builder information from B Rumary list supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004. Works numbers were 1065-1089 (August-November 1889). Most ended their days on the B&O, being retired in the 'teens.

In 1902, four of this class were sent to the Staten Island Rapid Transit as 1-4 (701, 792, 796, and 793, respectively). The last three went on to the Georgia Car & Locomotive company as 121-123. 122 went from there to the Piedmont & Northern in February 1912 as #70, 121 went to work for the Danville & Western as #77 in January 1911, and 122 served the Pascagoula-Moss Point Northern beginning in June 1912 as their #36.


Class I-5 (Locobase 11635)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Vol 15, p. 135. Works numbers were 10224, 10232, 10234-10235, 10239-10241, 10243, 10248-10249 in September 1889.


Class I-6 (Locobase 1243)

See Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964) for details; data from Baltimore & Ohio Steam and Electric Locomotive Diagrams by Alvin Staufer (self-published in 1964), supplied by Allen Stanley in May 2005 from his extensive Raildata collection and DeGolyer, Volume 17, p. 221 and Volume 18, 180. Works numbers were 12550-12551, 12553, 12557, 12570 in March 1892 (875-879), 12882-12887, 12899 in August 1892 (880-886); 13247-13250 in February 1893 (870-873), 13356, 13383, 13378-13381 in April 1893 (887-891, 874)

Two sub-groups in which 870-874 had 68" drivers and 18,410-lb tractive effort, shown here; they were delivered with tenders weighing 77,000 lb (.34,927 kg) loaded. The B & OSW I-6 entry (Locobase 6526) shows the class with 72" drivers and the so-called "Toboggan" inclined fireboxes.

All retired by 1916 (68") or 1923.


Class I-6 (Locobase 6526)

Data from B & OSW diagram book dated July 1900 supplied by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection May 2005. See Locobase 2017 for the origins of the B & OSW.

This class came from a larger group of I-6 locomotives built for the Baltimore & Ohio (Locobase 1243); apparently all of the B & OSW engines had 72" drivers. The diagrams also characterize the fireboxes as "toboggan furnaces". These are the seven mentioned in the B&O I-6 entry at Locobase 1243. The impacts on the original design included the deletion of two of the small tubes, a grate shortened by four inches, an increase in boiler pressure to 175 psi, and modest increases in weight.


Class I/I-1 (Locobase 1239)

Class I were 12 93,000-lb locomotives built in 1881-1883. These were all retired by 1916. Four "iron-boiler" I-1s were built by the B&O in 1883-1884 and ran until 1923. These were slightly heavier than the Is, but had the same BP.

"Steel-boiler" I-1s, 11 built in 1883-1886, apparently were a success, given the number built. SeeAlvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964) for details.

EHS, grate area, and weights from tables put up by Dr. Jonathan Smith --http://www.math.iastate.edu/jdhsmith/term/slusbo.htm (July 2002). Smith gives 145 psi for the I-1 and 1,182 sq ft for the I-class EHS.


Class I/M-2/M-2-78 (Locobase 2018)

See Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964) for details; data from Baltimore & Ohio Steam and Electric Locomotive Diagrams by Alvin Staufer (self-published in 1964), supplied by Allen Stanley in May 2005 from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 20, p. 75. See Locobase 2017 for the origins of the B&OSW.

Works numbers were 14617 in December 1895, 14618-14619 in January 1896 (72" drivers) and 14620-14622 in January 1896 with express-engine-sized 78" drivers that reduced tractive effort to 18,830 lb; they weighed 4,000 lb more.

Note that these were good-sized Eight-wheelers showing a sizable axle loading and large-diameter tubes. Later the three later engines received the 72" drivers used by the first 3. Reclassified M-2 on the B&O in 1900 and ran until 1934.


Class K (Locobase 2086)

Renumbered 633-637, 640, 642 when the CL&W became part of the B&O; they were classified B-36. Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964).


Class M-1 (Locobase 2574)

From EP Alexander's Iron Horse (Pl 84) and Staufer. See also DeGolyer, Volume 16, p. 156; Volume 17, p. 89; and Volume 18, pp. 45 and 185. Works numbers were 11454-11456 in December 1890; 12108-12110 in August 1891; 12880-12881, 12893 in August 1892; 13360 in April 1893.

The first six locomotives' boilers were set at 140 psi (9.66 bar) and tender water capacity was 3,500 US gallons (13,248 litres). The specs for 855-857 showed a boiler pressure increase to 165 psi. Operational experience exposed weaknesses in the injector design. The specs for 852-854 said the "present location" of the injector's waste pipe threw water and steam against the front window. The railroad also requested "additional fastenings" to secure the injector to the boiler as the "ordinary pipe connections" weren't sufficient. The tender had a water scoop for on-the-move refilling from between-track troughs.

Alexander describes these engines as the motive power for the crack express Royal Blue that ran from New York to Washington in five hours. Three railroads handled the train -- the Jersey Central (Jersey City to Bound Brook, NJ - 30 miles), the Reading (Bound Brook to Philadelphia -- 60 miles) and the B&O. The B&O's schedule was 179 minutes for 137 miles, from which time one should deduct the Baltimore ferry crossing.

Baldwin noted the suppliers to the construction of 858, which was shown at the 1893 Columbian Exhibition in Chicago:

Boiler and fire-box steel Carnegie Steel Co., Limited, Pittsburgh, Pa.

Tubes Reading Iron Co., Reading, Pa.

Tires Standard Steel Works, Philadelphia, Pa.

Metallic packing United States Metallic Packing Co., Philadelphia, Pa.

Safety-valves Coale Muffler and Safety-Valve Co., Baltimore, Md.

Headlight Star Headlight Co., Rochester, N. Y.

Driving, tender, and train brake Westinghouse Air Brake Co.,Pittsburgh, Pa.

Engine truck brake American Brake Co., St. Louis, Mo.

Tender brake-beams National Hollow Brake Beam Co., Chicago, 111.

Four of the class -- 850-851, 853, 857 -- were rebuilt with 72" drivers. 849 was retired in 1918, 856 in 1920; 852, 854 in 1922; 851, 853, 855, and 858 in 1923; and 857 in 1925.


Class M-5 (Locobase 2078)

Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964).

Relatively powerful Americans taken up by the B&O in 1927 and renumbered 865-867. Retired in 1930.


Class M-6/M-6a (Locobase 2079)

Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964).

Like the M-5, but with slightly smaller drivers. B&O in 1927 and renumbered 868 (M-6a/163) and 869 (M-6/164). Retired in 1930.


Class U (Locobase 3142)

Data from "New Dickson Eight-Wheeler," Locomotive Engineering (April 1898) as reproduced in the International Railway Congress's Monthly Bulleting, Volume 12, p. 834.

The LE report compared this design to a notional design described in an 1898 paper delivered to the Railway Master Mechanics' Association on the proper ratio of heating surface and grate area to cylinder volume. The reporter comments:"This new Dickson locomotive, whether by design or accident, conies very closely to the rules laid down by the committee referred to, except in the size of steam and exhaust ports, an exception which proves the good sense of the designers."

JF Webber's list of Dickson locomotives (conveyed to Locobase by Allen Stanley in March 2004) gives the works number as 962 (December 1897). It was apparently unique.

NB: Tube length is an estimate based on the calculation of tube surface area by subtracting reported firebox heating surface from reported total evaporative heating surface


Class William Mason (Locobase 3194)

Data from Alvin F Staufer's Baltimore & Ohio Steam and Electric Locomotives (Medina, Ohio) supplied by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection May 2005. Works numbers were 46-47 in August 1856.

Another of William Mason's elegant Americans, this engine was the first purchase by the new locomotive superintendent of the Baltimore & Ohio. According to Snowden-Bell (1912), this was the first of several engines that ran for decades and were the elite of the line.

Kinert, 1962 says that Mason's 700-odd locomotives used interchangeable parts and were known for their reliability. See White (1962) for his contention that Mason's legacy lies in the "symmetrical design" the appearance of a locomotive that he worked so digilently to achieve. He should, says White, be seen as "a gifted stylist rather than a mechanical innovator as far as locomotive history is concerned."

In the 37 years of operation (1853-1890), Mason's works produced a total of 754 locomotives.

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class17/H-1220 / G-1420/M-322/M-432
Locobase ID2105 2092 2106 13904 2546
RailroadCoal & Coke (B&O)Valley Railway (B&O)Coal & Coke (B&O)Coal & Coke (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio (B&O)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class21211
Road Numbers17-18/717-7182021-22/862-86322/864
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built21211
BuilderBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoBaldwinRoss Winans
Year19051884190619121856
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonBakerlink
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase 8.67' 8.50' 8.50' 8.50' 4.50'
Engine Wheelbase23.17'22.42'23.33'23.33'13.54'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.37 0.38 0.36 0.36 0.33
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)36.27'53.62'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers67000 lbs54000 lbs89800 lbs87000 lbs
Engine Weight100000 lbs80000 lbs132000 lbs130000 lbs
Tender Light Weight100000 lbs100000 lbs100000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight200000 lbs232000 lbs230000 lbs
Tender Water Capacity5000 gals2400 gals5000 gals5000 gals1000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)10.5 tons10 tons tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)56 lb/yard45 lb/yard75 lb/yard73 lb/yard0
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter62"62"62"63"60"
Boiler Pressure180 psi145 psi180 psi180 psi90 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)18" x 24"17" x 24"20" x 24"20" x 24"14.5" x 20"
Tractive Effort19189 lbs13788 lbs23690 lbs23314 lbs5361 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.49 3.92 3.79 3.73
Heating Ability
Firebox Area133.46 sq. ft154 sq. ft177 sq. ft68.55 sq. ft
Grate Area17.62 sq. ft17.10 sq. ft35 sq. ft34.80 sq. ft13.15 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1528 sq. ft1977 sq. ft1879 sq. ft632 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface1528 sq. ft01977 sq. ft1879 sq. ft632 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume216.17226.55215.32165.34
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation31722480630062641184
Same as above plus superheater percentage31722480630062641184
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area24023027720318606170
Power L157770585559862295
Power MT380.180287.48303.38

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class36762848B-28C
Locobase ID9603 1438 10804 1447 1072
RailroadCincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio (B&O)Monongahela River (B&O)Buffalo & Susquehanna (B&O)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class22112
Road Numbers36-37762-7638481176-177/14-15
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built22112
BuilderBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoNew York (Rome)Burnham, Williams & Co
Year18721886188918901905
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase8'7' 7.50' 8.50'
Engine Wheelbase22'21'21.92'22.92'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.36 0.33 0.34 0.37
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)46.67'50'50.79'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)0
Weight on Drivers44800 lbs70000 lbs75515 lbs95980 lbs
Engine Weight72220 lbs109800 lbs109480 lbs74000 lbs143200 lbs
Tender Light Weight47398 lbs0106800 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight119618 lbs250000 lbs
Tender Water Capacity3000 gals3500 gals5000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)010 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)37 lb/yard58 lb/yard63 lb/yard080 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter61"69"66"62"69"
Boiler Pressure135 psi140 psi180 psi140 psi210 psi
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke)16" x 24"18" x 24"12" x 24"16" x 24"19" x 26"
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke)20" x 24" (2)
Tractive Effort11558 lbs13411 lbs11782 lbs11793 lbs24281 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.88 5.22 6.41 3.95
Heating Ability
Firebox Area93.85 sq. ft215 sq. ft139 sq. ft154.85 sq. ft
Grate Area15.09 sq. ft68 sq. ft24.50 sq. ft44 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface899 sq. ft1483 sq. ft1689 sq. ft2222 sq. ft
Superheating Surface0
Combined Heating Surface899 sq. ft1483 sq. ft1689 sq. ft02222 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume160.97209.80537.63260.43
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation20379520441009240
Same as above plus superheater percentage20379520441009240
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area126703010025020032519
Power L133625826540908481
Power MT330.89366.97315.83389.61

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassC / G-9Class 6-16Class BClass E/H-8Class P
Locobase ID2006 2039 2023 2016 2035
RailroadOhio River (B&O)Zanesville & Ohio River (B&O)Cleveland, Delphos & St Louis (B&O)Ohio & Mississippi (B&O)Pittsburgh & Western (B&O)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class162141
Road Numbers4,16,10,2...7-8 / 656, 66010-13101-104 / 665-668
GaugeStdStd3'StdStd
Number Built162141
BuilderBrooksBurnham, Williams & CoPittsburghshopsPittsburgh
Year18831894188218841880
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase 8.50' 8.50'
Engine Wheelbase22.50'22.33'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.38 0.38
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)44.67'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers56000 lbs59000 lbs
Engine Weight74000 lbs89900 lbs44700 lbs90600 lbs83800 lbs
Tender Light Weight72000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight162600 lbs
Tender Water Capacity3000 gals3400 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)8 tons tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)047 lb/yard049 lb/yard0
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter62"62"43.75"63"64"
Boiler Pressure135 psi150 psi140 psi155 psi145 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)17" x 24"17" x 24"12.1" x 18"18" x 24"17" x 24"
Tractive Effort12837 lbs14264 lbs7168 lbs16262 lbs13357 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.93 3.63
Heating Ability
Firebox Area124.50 sq. ft
Grate Area17.10 sq. ft17 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1213 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface0001213 sq. ft0
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume171.60
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation02565026350
Same as above plus superheater percentage02565026350
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area000192980
Power L100042260
Power MT0315.82

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassClass RClass SClass TD / G-18D / G-18
Locobase ID2036 2037 2038 9600 9601
RailroadPittsburgh, Cleveland & Toledo (B&O)Pittsburgh & Western (B&O)Pittsburgh & Western (B&O)Ohio & Mississippi (B&O)Ohio & Mississippi (B&O)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class32231
Road Numbers107, 110, 11268-69, 57-60248-249600-603606
GaugeStdStdStdStd6'
Number Built32231
BuilderPittsburghPittsburghPittsburghshopsshops
Year18831885189918831871
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase8'8'
Engine Wheelbase22'22.33'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.36 0.36
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)44.58'44'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers55250 lbs49000 lbs
Engine Weight83800 lbs83800 lbs133000 lbs86275 lbs76900 lbs
Tender Light Weight66950 lbs60000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight153225 lbs136900 lbs
Tender Water Capacity4500 gals3200 gals2500 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)7.1 tons6.5 tons6.5 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)00046 lb/yard41 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter68"64"70"63"63"
Boiler Pressure145 psi145 psi180 psi140 psi140 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)18" x 24"18" x 24"20" x 26"17" x 24"17" x 24"
Tractive Effort14094 lbs14975 lbs22731 lbs13101 lbs13101 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.22 3.74
Heating Ability
Firebox Area164.10 sq. ft97 sq. ft108 sq. ft
Grate Area24.90 sq. ft15.85 sq. ft15 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface2262 sq. ft1267 sq. ft952 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface002262 sq. ft1267 sq. ft952 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume239.27200.95150.99
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation00448222192100
Same as above plus superheater percentage00448222192100
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area00295381358015120
Power L100684740853479
Power MT326.00313.06

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassD / G-18Director GeneralE / H-8E / H-8E / H-8
Locobase ID9602 11182 9597 9598 9599
RailroadOhio & Mississippi (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio (B&O)Ohio & Mississippi (B&O)Ohio & Mississippi (B&O)Ohio & Mississippi (B&O)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class31335
Road Numbers605, 607, 610859669, 671, 673670, 674, 675
Gauge6'StdStdStdStd
Number Built31335
BuildershopsBurnham, Williams & Coshopsshopsshops
Year18671893188818901890
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase8' 7.50' 8.50' 8.50' 8.83'
Engine Wheelbase22.08'22.33'22.50'22.83'22.83'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.36 0.34 0.38 0.37 0.39
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)44.33'45.33'45.08'45.33'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers54800 lbs78480 lbs63500 lbs64000 lbs64000 lbs
Engine Weight94700 lbs122780 lbs97500 lbs98000 lbs98000 lbs
Tender Light Weight64300 lbs72000 lbs72000 lbs72000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight159000 lbs169500 lbs170000 lbs170000 lbs
Tender Water Capacity3000 gals130 gals3400 gals3400 gals3400 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)6 tons tons8 tons8 tons8 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)46 lb/yard65 lb/yard53 lb/yard53 lb/yard53 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter67"78"63"69"63"
Boiler Pressure140 psi180 psi155 psi160 psi155 psi
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke)17" x 24"13.5" x 24"18" x 24"18" x 24"18" x 24"
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke)23" x 24" (2)
Tractive Effort12319 lbs12763 lbs16262 lbs15327 lbs16262 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.45 6.15 3.90 4.18 3.94
Heating Ability
Firebox Area107 sq. ft149 sq. ft137 sq. ft142.50 sq. ft142.50 sq. ft
Grate Area14.25 sq. ft24.75 sq. ft17 sq. ft17 sq. ft18 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1093 sq. ft1693 sq. ft1460 sq. ft1465 sq. ft1418 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface1093 sq. ft1693 sq. ft1460 sq. ft1465 sq. ft1418 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume173.35425.80206.55207.26200.61
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation19954455263527202790
Same as above plus superheater percentage19954455263527202790
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area1498026820212352280022088
Power L140374943493956684905
Power MT324.82277.71342.95390.49337.93

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassE/H-9/H-9-72FFFG
Locobase ID2017 1439 1440 1441 1230
RailroadBaltimore & Ohio Southwestern (B&O)Staten Island Rapid Transit (B & O)Staten Island Rapid Transit (B & O)Staten Island Rapid Transit (B & O)Baltimore & Ohio (B&O)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class515413
Road Numbers1-5 / 131-135 / 695-699623-2731-34319+
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built515413
BuilderBrooksBurnham, Williams & CoCookeAlcoB & O
Year18901892190619101870
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase9'7'
Engine Wheelbase23.25'21.08'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.39 0.33
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)45.42'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers67500 lbs54000 lbs
Engine Weight103700 lbs81000 lbs116300 lbs116300 lbs72000 lbs
Tender Light Weight98000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight201700 lbs
Tender Water Capacity4800 gals2200 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)9 tons tons tons tons tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)56 lb/yard45 lb/yard000
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter67"60"60"60"64"
Boiler Pressure160 psi160 psi180 psi200 psi135 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)18" x 24"16" x 24"16" x 24"16" x 24"17" x 24"
Tractive Effort15784 lbs13926 lbs15667 lbs17408 lbs12436 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.28 3.88
Heating Ability
Firebox Area144 sq. ft
Grate Area18.06 sq. ft23.30 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1279 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface1279 sq. ft0000
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume180.94
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation28903728000
Same as above plus superheater percentage28903728000
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area230400000
Power L150530000
Power MT330.070

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassGGG-1/G-2G-10G-11
Locobase ID1437 2115 1231 2007 2008
RailroadStaten Island Rapid Transit (B & O)Dayton & Union (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio (B&O)Ohio River (B&O)Ohio River (B&O)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class111831
Road Numbers561501+21-23 / 657-65925 / 655
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built111831
BuilderDicksonSchenectadyB & OPittsburghBrooks
Year19001888187519001895
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase
Engine Wheelbase
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers
Engine Weight80000 lbs100600 lbs91150 lbs88000 lbs74000 lbs
Tender Light Weight
Total Engine and Tender Weight
Tender Water Capacity
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)00000
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter60"64"69"62"62"
Boiler Pressure140 psi150 psi160 psi175 psi160 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)17" x 22"17" x 24"17" x 24"17" x 24"17" x 24"
Tractive Effort12610 lbs13818 lbs13671 lbs16641 lbs15214 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort)
Heating Ability
Firebox Area
Grate Area
Evaporative Heating Surface
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface00000
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation00000
Same as above plus superheater percentage00000
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area00000
Power L100000
Power MT

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassG-15G-17G-18G-3G-3
Locobase ID2093 2100 2113 1228 1232
RailroadPittsburgh, Akron, & Western (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio Chicago Terminal (B&O)Morgantown & Kingwood (B & O)Baltimore & Ohio (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio (B&O)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class110154
Road Numbers28633, 6427238, 297-299, 122239
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built110154
BuilderPittsburghunkBurnham, Williams & CoB&OB & O
Year18921890190318651870
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase 8.33'
Engine Wheelbase20.35'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.41
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers59300 lbs
Engine Weight89200 lbs91000 lbs95600 lbs78000 lbs78000 lbs
Tender Light Weight62000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight157600 lbs
Tender Water Capacity6000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)0049 lb/yard00
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter62"63"62"64"64"
Boiler Pressure145 psi130 psi160 psi130 psi140 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)17" x 24"17" x 24"17" x 24"17" x 24"17" x 24"
Tractive Effort13788 lbs12166 lbs15214 lbs11975 lbs12897 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.90
Heating Ability
Firebox Area114.50 sq. ft
Grate Area16.50 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1274 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface001274 sq. ft00
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume202.06
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation00264000
Same as above plus superheater percentage00264000
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area001832000
Power L100484200
Power MT360.03

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassG-6HHHH odd
Locobase ID1229 1233 2116 2118 2094
RailroadPittsburgh & Connellsville (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio (B&O)Dayton & Union (B&O)Dayton & Union (B&O)Cleveland Terminal & Valley (B&O)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class143111
Road Numbers9 / 709 / 616408626321
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built143111
BuilderPittsburghB & OPittsburghPittsburghBrooks
Year18671873189618941885
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase
Engine Wheelbase
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers50715 lbs
Engine Weight85500 lbs81585 lbs102500 lbs102000 lbs86500 lbs
Tender Light Weight
Total Engine and Tender Weight
Tender Water Capacity
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)042 lb/yard000
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter62"69"70"64"62"
Boiler Pressure150 psi130 psi160 psi140 psi140 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)17" x 24"18" x 24"18" x 24"18" x 24"18" x 24"
Tractive Effort14264 lbs12453 lbs15108 lbs14459 lbs14925 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.07
Heating Ability
Firebox Area
Grate Area18 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface960 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface0960 sq. ft000
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume135.81
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation02340000
Same as above plus superheater percentage02340000
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area00000
Power L100000
Power MT0

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassH-10H-11H-12H-2/H-3H-5
Locobase ID2052 2155 2054 1235 1237
RailroadCincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton (B&O)Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton (B&O)Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio (B&O)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class1012325
Road Numbers200-209210 / 716211-212274/276/283700-702, 776-797
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built1012325
BuilderAlco-SchenectadyBrooksPittsburghB & OPittsburgh
Year18971893189918831889
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase8'9'
Engine Wheelbase22.67'20.08'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.35 0.45
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)46.67'44.71'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)37400 lbs
Weight on Drivers74000 lbs42300 lbs
Engine Weight97000 lbs112000 lbs117000 lbs93000 lbs109300 lbs
Tender Light Weight90000 lbs67900 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight202000 lbs177200 lbs
Tender Water Capacity4200 gals3000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)8.5 tons tons tons6 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)062 lb/yard0035 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter69"73"69"69"60"
Boiler Pressure160 psi180 psi180 psi135 psi165 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)18" x 24"18" x 26"18" x 26"18" x 24"18" x 24"
Tractive Effort15327 lbs17656 lbs18679 lbs12932 lbs18176 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.19 2.33
Heating Ability
Firebox Area152 sq. ft125.60 sq. ft
Grate Area22.60 sq. ft18 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1524 sq. ft1370 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface01524 sq. ft001370 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume199.02193.82
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation04068002970
Same as above plus superheater percentage04068002970
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area0273600020724
Power L106532004664
Power MT389.20486.16

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassI-5I-6I-6I/I-1I/M-2/M-2-78
Locobase ID11635 1243 6526 1239 2018
RailroadBaltimore & Ohio (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern (B&O)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class1020286
Road Numbers838-847870-886, 887-891876, 883-884, 887, 891612+140-145/1418-1423
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built1020286
BuilderBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoB&OB & OBurnham, Williams & Co
Year18891892189218811896
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase 7.50' 7.50' 7.50' 8.50'
Engine Wheelbase21.83'22.33'22.33'23.33'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.34 0.34 0.34 0.36
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)47.14'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)38600 lbs38600 lbs45750 lbs
Weight on Drivers72000 lbs74200 lbs76000 lbs61740 lbs91500 lbs
Engine Weight104000 lbs113700 lbs117400 lbs94815 lbs134500 lbs
Tender Light Weight102260 lbs102260 lbs101000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight215960 lbs219660 lbs235500 lbs
Tender Water Capacity3500 gals3000 gals3000 gals5000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)10 tons10 tons tons10 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)60 lb/yard62 lb/yard63 lb/yard51 lb/yard76 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter66"68"72"69"72"
Boiler Pressure140 psi165 psi175 psi140 psi180 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)19" x 24"19" x 24"19" x 24"19" x 24"20" x 24"
Tractive Effort15621 lbs17870 lbs17900 lbs14942 lbs20400 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.61 4.15 4.25 4.13 4.49
Heating Ability
Firebox Area139 sq. ft133.50 sq. ft141 sq. ft187 sq. ft
Grate Area24.50 sq. ft28.10 sq. ft27.18 sq. ft26 sq. ft34.70 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1689 sq. ft1579 sq. ft1565 sq. ft1145 sq. ft2045 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface1689 sq. ft1579 sq. ft1565 sq. ft1145 sq. ft2045 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume214.45200.49198.71145.38234.34
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation34304637475736406246
Same as above plus superheater percentage34304637475736406246
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area194602202824675033660
Power L146625334605307376
Power MT285.50316.97351.170355.44

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassKM-1M-5M-6/M-6aU
Locobase ID2086 2574 2078 2079 3142
RailroadCleveland, Lorain, & Wheeling (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio (B&O)Cincinnati, Indianapolis, & Western (B & O)Cincinnati, Indianapolis, & Western (B & O)Buffalo, Rochester, & Pittsburgh (B&O)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class710321
Road Numbers13-19849-858160-162163-16415
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built710321
BuilderPittsburghBurnham, Williams & CoBrooksAlcoDickson
Year18901890190419041897
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase 7.50'
Engine Wheelbase21.92'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.34
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)47.42'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)39000 lbs
Weight on Drivers77000 lbs77300 lbs
Engine Weight91000 lbs114300 lbs135700 lbs138500 lbs118200 lbs
Tender Light Weight90400 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight204700 lbs
Tender Water Capacity4500 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)8 tons tons tons tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)064 lb/yard0064 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter63"78"67"66"68"
Boiler Pressure150 psi165 psi180 psi180 psi180 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)17" x 24"20" x 24"18" x 26"18" x 26"18" x 24"
Tractive Effort14037 lbs17262 lbs19237 lbs19528 lbs17496 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.46 4.42
Heating Ability
Firebox Area143.45 sq. ft138.32 sq. ft
Grate Area25 sq. ft28 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1687 sq. ft1784 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface01687 sq. ft001784 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume193.32252.38
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation04125005040
Same as above plus superheater percentage04125005040
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area0236690024898
Power L105910007145
Power MT338.42407.56

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassWilliam Mason
Locobase ID3194
RailroadBaltimore & Ohio (B&O)
CountryUSA
Whyte4-4-0
Number in Class6
Road Numbers25-26/55, 49
GaugeStd
Number Built6
BuilderWilliam Mason
Year1857
Valve GearStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase7'
Engine Wheelbase20.79'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.34
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)41.33'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers40500 lbs
Engine Weight56000 lbs
Tender Light Weight40000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight96000 lbs
Tender Water Capacity
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)34 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter60"
Boiler Pressure100 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)16" x 22"
Tractive Effort7979 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 5.08
Heating Ability
Firebox Area86.50 sq. ft
Grate Area15 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface784 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface784 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume153.14
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation1500
Same as above plus superheater percentage1500
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area8650
Power L12376
Power MT258.68

Photos

Reference


If you have any railroad data such as diagram books, rail station plans or anything else that you would be willing to share, please contact us.