Erie / Erie & Wyoming Valley / New York, Lake Erie & Western / New York, Pennsylvania & Ohio 4-4-0 "American" Locomotives of the USA


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class 100 (Locobase 12550)

Data from Angus Sinclair, Development of the Locomotive Engine (New York: Angus Sinclair Publishing, 1907), p.269. (Sinclair attributes the 1853 American Railway Journal article from which he derived the information to Zerah Colburn.) Works numbers were 251-252 in March 1851, 257-258 in April, 261 in May, and 263 in June.

Boiler pressure is a Locobase estimate. A photograph on page 35 of the Railroad & Locomotive Historical Society Bulletin 167's compilation Rogers, Ketchum & Grosvenor locomotive production shows the 102. It was of classic American locomotive form: long "cowcatcher" leading, tall, broad balloon stack over closely spaced truck axles, inside-connected cylinders, single splasher/running board over the drivers, small, ornate dome over the firebox, and paired arched windows in the cab/


Class 11 (Locobase 12530)

Data from Angus Sinclair, Development of the Locomotive Engine (New York: Angus Sinclair Publishing, 1907), p.266. (Sinclair attributes the 1853 American Railway Journal article from which he derived the information to Zerah Colburn.)

Boiler pressure is a Locobase estimate.


Class 113 (Locobase 12551)

Data from Angus Sinclair, Development of the Locomotive Engine (New York: Angus Sinclair Publishing, 1907), p.269. (Sinclair attributes the 1853 American Railway Journal article from which he derived the information to Zerah Colburn.) Works numbers were 68-69 in May 1851.

Boiler pressure is a Locobase estimate.


Class 115 (Locobase 12552)

Data from Angus Sinclair, Development of the Locomotive Engine (New York: Angus Sinclair Publishing, 1907), p.270. (Sinclair attributes the 1853 American Railway Journal article from which he derived the information to Zerah Colburn.) Works numbers were 70-71 in June 1851, 74-75 in July.

Boiler pressure is a Locobase estimate.


Class 119 (Locobase 12553)

Data from Angus Sinclair, Development of the Locomotive Engine (New York: Angus Sinclair Publishing, 1907), p.270. (Sinclair attributes the 1853 American Railway Journal article from which he derived the information to Zerah Colburn.) See also Edward Harold Mott, Between the Ocean and the Lakes (New York: John S Collins, 1899). Works numbers were 307-308, 306, 309-310 in June 1851, 312 in July.

Note the long stroke on this locomotive, which, together with the small drivers, meant relatively high piston speeds that might have challenged contemporary lubrication.

Boiler pressure is a Locobase estimate.


Class 133 (Locobase 12554)

Data from Angus Sinclair, Development of the Locomotive Engine (New York: Angus Sinclair Publishing, 1907), p.269. (Sinclair attributes the 1853 American Railway Journal article from which he derived the information to Zerah Colburn.) Works numbers were approximately 36-37 in November and December 1851 and 41 in January 1851.

Boiler pressure is a Locobase estimate.


Class 14 (Locobase 12531)

Data from Angus Sinclair, Development of the Locomotive Engine (New York: Angus Sinclair Publishing, 1907), p.266. (Sinclair attributes the 1853 American Railway Journal article from which he derived the information to Zerah Colburn.) 14-16 were delivered in August, October, and December 1848 and 36-39 arrived in March 1849 (2), May, and July.

Essentially repeats of the 11 class shown in Locobase 12530 with taller drivers and a slightly smaller grate and firebox.

Boiler pressure is a Locobase estimate.


Class 142 (Locobase 12555)

Data from Angus Sinclair, Development of the Locomotive Engine (New York: Angus Sinclair Publishing, 1907), p.270. (Sinclair attributes the 1853 American Railway Journal article from which he derived the information to Zerah Colburn.)

Boiler pressure is a Locobase estimate.


Class 18 (Locobase 12532)

Data from Angus Sinclair, Development of the Locomotive Engine (New York: Angus Sinclair Publishing, 1907), p.266. (Sinclair attributes the 1853 American Railway Journal article from which he derived the information to Zerah Colburn.)

Shows a haystack boiler, straight stack, inclined outside cylinders over closely spaced bogie axles.

Boiler pressure is a Locobase estimate.


Class 209 (Locobase 9315)

Data from American v English Locomotives, Correspondence, Criticism, and Commentary respecting Their Relative Merits (New York: Robert K Pease, 1880), pp. 36-37. Works numbers not available. Produced in April 1855 (2), July, and September.

The publication of which the edition used by Locobase was a reprint was a document presented to both Houses of the General Assembly of New Zealand by Command of His Excellency in 1878. At issue was how the demand for motive power on New Zealand's railways should be met - through the purchase of the mother country's locomotives or by continuing to buy American engines.

To back up a rebuttal to a critic of American locomotive design, W W Evans cites Zerah Colburn's 1855 test of an Erie locomotive when he was General Manager. (Gerald M Best's thoroughly researched Erie roster presented in Railroad History Bulletin 131 of the Railway & Locomotive History Society concludes that the American engine was one of four produced by the NJL&M.)

Colburn first assembled a train of 100 cars loaded with "deals" weighing a total of 1,572 long tons and "a few feet more than half a mile long" and ran it along a nearly level (ruling grade of 0.12% or 1 in 880) gradient for 4 miles at 5 mph. On a "dead-level" 5-mile section that had gentle curves of 957-foot radius, the locomotive managed 9.7 mph. Then Colburn cut the trailing load to 30 cars weighing 514 tons and recorded the train ascending a 1 in 117.5 (0.45%) grade at 10.25 mph.

Evans concludes:"Allowing for resistances due to gravity and also to concussions and frictions of engine and train, the coefficient of adhesion must have been 1/3 the weight on driving wheels." In later measurements, the fraction of adhesion (weight on drivers divided by tractive effort) comes to 3.14. So slippery a proportion suggests a very careful manipulation of throttle and liberal use of sand in all of these trials.

209 was rebuilt by the Susquehanna shops in March 1869, a makeover that increased engine weight to 78,000 lb (35,380 kg). 210 was converted to a tank engine with the same 4-4-0 layout. 210-212 were all retired by 1878.


Class 40 (Locobase 12536)

Data from Angus Sinclair, Development of the Locomotive Engine (New York: Angus Sinclair Publishing, 1907), p.266. (Sinclair attributes the 1853 American Railway Journal article from which he derived the information to Zerah Colburn.) Works numbers were 185 in August 1849, 186-187 in September (road numbers 43-45); 207 in March 1850 (road 42), 201, 203 in July. (40-41).

Shows a haystack boiler, straight stack, inclined outside cylinders over closely spaced bogie axles. According to Sinclair, this design had "nearly the same dimensions and weight" as the 30-31 shown in Locobase 12532. Only the weights were different.

Boiler pressure is a Locobase estimate.


Class 48 (Locobase 12537)

Data from Angus Sinclair, Development of the Locomotive Engine (New York: Angus Sinclair Publishing, 1907), p.266. (Sinclair attributes the 1853 American Railway Journal article from which he derived the information to Zerah Colburn.)

Boiler pressure is a Locobase estimate.


Class 52 (Locobase 12539)

Data from Angus Sinclair, Development of the Locomotive Engine (New York: Angus Sinclair Publishing, 1907), p.266. (Sinclair attributes the 1853 American Railway Journal article from which he derived the information to Zerah Colburn.). Gerald M Best's Erie roster--Railroad History Bulletin 131--credits this trio to Hinkley as their works 249, 252, 254 in November-December 1849.

Sinclair said that this trio came from west of the Appalachians. Western was a general-equipment producer whose Cuyahoga Works turned locomotives as well as ships and many other kinds of machinery. Since most sources show the Cuyahoga as producing its first locomotive a year later, Locobase adopts the later research by several authoritative sources.

Boiler pressure is a Locobase estimate.


Class 64 (Locobase 12541)

Data from Angus Sinclair, Development of the Locomotive Engine (New York: Angus Sinclair Publishing, 1907), p.268. (Sinclair attributes the 1853 American Railway Journal article from which he derived the information to Zerah Colburn.) Works numbers were 223-224 in August 1850.

Described as having "extreme outside connections" which Locobase supposes means the cylinders were outside and drove on the rear adhesive axle.

Boiler pressure is a Locobase estimate.


Class 66 (Locobase 12543)

Data from Angus Sinclair, Development of the Locomotive Engine (New York: Angus Sinclair Publishing, 1907), p.268. (Sinclair attributes the 1853 American Railway Journal article from which he derived the information to Zerah Colburn.) Works number was 229 in September 1850.

Boiler pressure is a Locobase estimate. Although delivered only a month after the pair shown in Locobase 12542, this engine had a larger boiler and grate.


Class 70 (Locobase 12542)

Data from Angus Sinclair, Development of the Locomotive Engine (New York: Angus Sinclair Publishing, 1907), p.266. (Sinclair attributes the 1853 American Railway Journal article from which he derived the information to Zerah Colburn.). Works numbers were 20-21 in October 1850.

Boiler pressure is a Locobase estimate.


Class 84 (Locobase 12545)

Data from Angus Sinclair, Development of the Locomotive Engine (New York: Angus Sinclair Publishing, 1907), p.266. (Sinclair attributes the 1853 American Railway Journal article from which he derived the information to Zerah Colburn.) See also Edward Harold Mott, Between the Ocean and the Lakes (New York: John S Collins, 1899), p. 396.

This pair was among the last of Norris's engines to be procured in the United States and their layout shows how far behind the times the company had fallen. Notice, though, the very unusual bore and stroke ratio and the very high factor of adhesion.

Mott pronounces a harsh sentence on the "Plank Roads", as he says they were nicknamed. They arrived with "...sevenfoot drivers, and cylinders 15x20, outside-connected, and fire-box not much larger than an ordinary cooking range. The cylinders were placed aft of the smoke arch and steam pipe, out of doors, between the dome and steam-chest. There was a running board from the back end of the footboard entirely around to the other side."

Built for speed, they could turn a sprightly wheel, says Mott: "With two or three coaches, on the Susquehanna Division, after getting under headway, the engineers would make good time with these; but it took a mile start to get them under way." He later quotes an 1853 account of the 84 covering the 145 miles between Susquehanna and Holmesville in 161 minutes (55 mph), which was no mean accomplishment.

But he adds: "They were a failure, of course." And a locomotive disliked by its crew can come in for some pretty unpleasant treatment: "No engineer wanted to run them, and the last one in train service (No. 84), on its very last trip, was ripped to pieces by Mike Barnwell, its engineer, who, it was said, stopped his train just after passing Gulf Summit, west bound, took a wrench and loosened up set-screws and pins, and whistled off brakes, whereupon the whole of her machinery was cleaned off. "

NB: Boiler pressure is a Locobase estimate.


Class 90 (Locobase 12549)

Data from Angus Sinclair, Development of the Locomotive Engine (New York: Angus Sinclair Publishing, 1907), p.269. (Sinclair attributes the 1853 American Railway Journal article from which he derived the information to Zerah Colburn.) See also Edward Harold Mott, Between the Ocean and the Lakes (New York: John S Collins, 1899).

Notable for being a relatively large homogeneous class by a builder that would be known as Hinkley Locomotive Works.

Boiler pressure is a Locobase estimate.


Class A / D-1 (Locobase 359)

Data from Westing's Erie Power (1970), tables in "The Locomotives of the New York, Lake Erie & Western Railroad", American Engineer & Railroading Journal, Vol LXVIII, No 12 (December 1894), pp. 564-566, and the Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

30 engines built by Brooks, Danforth, Grant, and the Erie's own Susquehanna shop from 1880 to 1882.


Class A / D-16 (Locobase 9227)

Data from Westing's Erie Power (1970) and Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Originally the Atlantic & Great Western, this line was an important component in the Erie system and spent much of its life leased to the Erie, in receivership, or both. 1882 saw a much deeper involvement in the Nypano (as the NY, P & O was more familiarly known) that culminated years later in the retirement of NY, P & O securities in favor of Erie paper.

As Edward Harold Mott described the union in Between the Ocean and the Lakes: The Story of Erie (1907)

" The long-conflicting, costly, and harassing relations of the Erie with this railroad were at last set at rest forever by an agreement whereby the Erie should operate the road at a fixed annual rental until it could be sold under foreclosure proceedings and reorganized into the Erie system. After due proceedings in the courts, the property was sold at public auction February 25, 1896, and purchased by a committee in behalf of the Erie."

During its "separate" existence, the railroad's shops at Meadville and Galion built this class of Eight-wheelers. They were slightly larger versions of the design that would later be classed as D-17; see Locobase 9226.


Class A / D-2 (Locobase 360)

37 engines built at Susquehanna shops (except for 458, built by Grant) from 1882 to 1885. Compared to the D-1s, these had much bigger fireboxes, originally had boiler pressures between 100-115 psi.

Data from Westing's Erie Power (1970) and tables in "The Locomotives of the New York, Lake Erie & Western Railroad", American Engineer & Railroading Journal, Vol LXVIII, No 12 (December 1894), pp. 564-566.


Class B / D-3 (Locobase 361)

Data from Erie 1907 and Alvin F Staufer's Erie Steam Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

90 engines built from 1879 to 1885 in the Susquehanna shop, Grant, Dickson, and Jersey City. Boiler was smaller than the D-2.


Class Bradford (Locobase 12534)

Data from Angus Sinclair, Development of the Locomotive Engine (New York: Angus Sinclair Publishing, 1907), p.266. (Sinclair attributes the 1853 American Railway Journal article from which he derived the information to Zerah Colburn.) Works numbers were 346 in January 1849, 348 in March, and 349-350 in April.

These were the low-drivered Eight-wheelers ordered with the passenger engines shown in Locobase 12533 as a single batch.

Boiler pressure is a Locobase estimate.


Class CA & CE / D-17 (Locobase 9226)

Data from Westing's Erie Power (1970) and Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Although these homebuilt Eight-wheelers had small grates and boilers even for the mid-1870s, they stood relatively high in the amount of weight they put on their drivers. And they showed a good amount of tractive effort. The last ten were assigned to the Chicago & Atlantic..

The NY, P & O shops would add to the stud with engines later classified as D-16s; see Locobase 9227.


Class D-12 (Locobase 9223)

Data from Westing's Erie Power (1970) and Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

The first high-drivered Eight-wheelers on the Erie came into service in 1896 (See Locobase 9221) and built new by the Susquehanna shops. Three years later, Meadville shops came out with 4 of their own. The table at the front implies that these were rebuilds of D-9 (Locobase 9222), which were smaller and older.

Locobase finds that unlikely, given the larger grate and bigger boiler, the latter pressed to a much higher pressure. Moreover, there's one more D-12 than there were D-9s. So these are new Express engines to go with the D-11s supplied by Susquehanna.


Class D-13 / E B Thomas (Locobase 9217)

Data from Westing's Erie Power (1970) and Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

This The 1907 diagram shows that during a rebuilding, the shops removed seven tubes from the boiler, reducing the count to 265. The firebox area also decreased to 165 sq ft (15.3 sq m) and overall evaporative heating surface to 1,842 sq ft (171.2 sq m). Meanwhile, adhesion weight rose to 96,060 lb (43,572 kg) and overall engine weight increased to 136,930 lb (62,110 kg).


Class D-14 (Locobase 9224)

Data from Westing's Erie Power (1970) and Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

This locomotive was converted by Cooke to a cross-compound layout, according to Westing, but the cylinder dimensions are not given, or what we see in the diagram is the HP cylinder only. In any case, it was a "one-off".


Class D-15 (Locobase 9225)

Data from Westing's Erie Power (1970) and Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works numbers were 15454-15455.

These were the last two D6/D7 Vauclain compounds that had been converted from earlier simple expansion Eight-wheelers (Locobase 6695). The compounding ratio thus was a hefty 2.85. It can't have been too long before the engines were simplified as shown in the specfications.


Class D-18 (Locobase 9228)

Data from Westing's Erie Power (1970) and Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 13, p. 262. Works numbers were 8717 8725

The Pennsylvania Coal Company bought these two camelbacks from Baldwin with an obvious eye toward operating mountain-oriented local passenger service. Unfortunately, the image of the Baldwin specs is blurry and the data are incomplete. They were rebuilt by Dickson in 1896 ( that's what this entry's specifications describe) and later taken into the Erie when that railroad bought the E & WV from Pennsylvania Coal.


Class D-4 (Locobase 362)

Although classed as D-4s, the first of these engines preceded the earlier D-series engines. The D-1s that succeeded them had larger boilers and 18 x 22 in pistons. 72 D-4s were built in Susquehanna, Brooks, Manchester, and Dickson.


Class D-5 - rebuilt simple (Locobase 363)

Data from Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 20, p. 194.

Much larger 4-4-0 and one of the last for the Erie. The wide grate indicated the camelback layout, which has the steam dome behind the cab. These two engines started out as New York & Lake Erie engines 66-67, built by Danforth, Cooke and delivered in 1880.

Baldwin rebuilt them for the Erie (works numbers were 15056-15057 in September 1896), working according to a statement in the specs: "Old engines to be dismantled by the Extra Works Department. Parts used are to be put in repair by ExWkDept and used as though new parts from stock. ExWkDept to scrap parts not fit for use." The specs also provided a complete list of the parts they expected to reuse and those they would have to manufacture.

385's specs included the guarantee that it would pull 8 cars up a 1% grade.

386 was scrapped first in March 1913 with 385 following in December 1920.


Class D-6/D-7 - compound rebuild (Locobase 6695)

Data from Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also Data from "Rebuilt Erie Locomotive", Locomotive Engineering, Vol XI, No 2 (February 1898), p. 82. See also several DeGolyer entries: Volume 20, pp. 195, 237 ; Volume 21, pp. 20, 43, 104. Works numbers were 15231-15240, 152790-15282; 15297-15300 in April; 15311-15315 in May; 15420-15428, 15441-15446 in July.

This was a large class of camelback Eight-wheelers that were converted from simple expansion engines. Baldwin rebuilt them for the Erie,, working according to a statement in the specs: "Old engines to be dismantled by the Extra Works Department. Parts used are to be put in repair by ExWkDept and used as though new parts from stock. ExWkDept to scrap parts not fit for use." The specs also provided a complete list of the parts they expected to reuse and those they would have to manufacture. DeGolyer, Volume 20, p. 237 and Volume 21, pp. 21, 42, 105 lists all the parts transferred from each older engine to its corresponding compound modification.

Most were rebuilt with the 324 1 1/2" tubes as shown here; the last two were rebuilt with a smaller number of 2" tubes (Locobase 9218).

Like the 385, 386's specs included the guarantee that it would pull 8 cars up a 1% grade.

The tiny HP cylinders limited the whole Vauclain compound system's ability to handle the steam. Each set of an HP and an LP cylinder was served by a 10 1/2" (267 mm) piston valve.

Nevertheless, according to LE, "These engines are reported to be doing excellent work in service, much superior to that performed when they were simple."

All but two, however, were converted in 1904-1905 to simple expansion in several variants. One such conversion resulted in dimensions identical to those of the D-5 (see Locobase 363). Others were more substantially altered; see Locobase 6696 and 6697.


Class D-6/D-7 - simple, D flue (Locobase 6697)

Data from Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Converting the D-6 class of camelback Eight-wheelers led to three different versions. This one is identified on the diagram as having a D flue sheet (as opposed to the straight flue sheet shown in Locobase 6697).


Class D-6/D-7 - simple, strt flue (Locobase 6696)

Data from Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

This was a large class of camelback Eight-wheelers. When the D-6 Vauclain compounds were simpled, three different versions resulted. This one is identified on the diagram as having a straight flue sheet (as opposed to the D flue sheet shown in Locobase 6697). Locobase does not know why a "straight flue sheet" would result in so many fewer tubes and so small a firebox, even though the overall heating surface area rose.


Class D-7 - large tubes (Locobase 9218)

Data from Westing's Erie Power (1970) and Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 21, p. 104. Works numbers 15233, 15238, 15295, 15420, 15425-15428, 15451.

The Erie threw itself into Vauclain compounding, rebuilding more than four dozen engines from earlier 4-4-0s. Although almost all had the large boiler housing 324 1 1/2" tubes (Locobase 6995), the last two were rebuilt with a smaller number of larger-diameter tubes as shown here. Note the small size of both the HP cylinders (each served by the same 10 1/2" (267 mm) piston valve that supplied its companion LP cylinder).

Like the D-6s, these were soon simplified; see Locobase 9219.


Class D-7 - simple, combustion chbr (Locobase 9219)

Data from Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

As noted in Locobase 6695 and 6697, simplifying the Vauclain compounds that had been created out of earlier locomotives took several forms. The D-7 compound that was the source of the current entry (see Locobase 9218) originally had 2" tubes. A variant not reflected in the D-6 series was one in which a combustion chamber added some heating surface to the firebox, but reduced tube length and consequently required more of the tiny 1 1/2" tubes.


Class D-9 (Locobase 9222)


Class Genessee (Locobase 12535)

Data from Angus Sinclair, Development of the Locomotive Engine (New York: Angus Sinclair Publishing, 1907), p.266. (Sinclair attributes the 1853 American Railway Journal article from which he derived the information to Zerah Colburn.) Works numbers were 160-161 in February 1849.

Shows a haystack boiler, straight stack, inclined outside cylinders over closely spaced bogie axles. The second engine was named Onondaga.

Several more Erie locomotives had the same basic attributes (17" x 20" cylinders, 60" drivers) and were delivered in the same year. Works numbers 185-186 in August 1849 took road numbers 43-44. Works numbers 201, 203, and 207 in January, February, and March 1850, respectively, were numbered 46 (or possibly 40), 41, and 42.

Boiler pressure is a Locobase estimate.


Class K / D-8 (Locobase 6014)

Data from Westing's Erie Power (1970), Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection, and tables in "The Locomotives of the New York, Lake Erie & Western Railroad", American Engineer & Railroading Journal, Vol LXVIII, No 12 (December 1894), pp. 564-566.

AERJ noted that at that point this class was in heavy commuter service with local expresses. Also used for division work in express service.


Class M / D-10 (Locobase 9220)

Data from Westing's Erie Power (1970) and Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also "High Speed Passenger Locomotive of the New York, Lake Erie & Western Railroad, "National Car & Locomotive Builder, Vol XIX (April 1888), pp. 52-54.

Among the Eight-wheelers turned out by the Erie's Susquehanna shops was this duodecade of relatively large locomotives with equally sizable grates. Designed by superintendent of motive power John W Cloud, this was typical of the high-speed designs being offered, according to NCLB's editor Angus Sinclair. "The engine bears evidence throughout of very careful and thoughtful design, the proportion of parts and the distribution of weight being exceptionally good."

The engine's wagon top boiler gave Sinclair a chance to assert his preference for that design over the increasingly popular Belpaire firebox. "We have watched the Belpaire form of firebox with close attention, and we have yet to find the first locomotive with that form of firebox that does not give more or less trouble by entraining water with the steam."

Van Arsdale noted that the use of anthracite coal dictated the large grate and firebox.

Most of the class was scrapped in the late-teens and 1920s. Two--479 and 481--were sold in February 1922 to the Dayton, Toledo & Chicago.


Class Monroe (Locobase 12528)

Data from Angus Sinclair, Development of the Locomotive Engine (New York: Angus Sinclair Publishing, 1907), p.266. (Sinclair attributes the 1853 American Railway Journal article from which he derived the information to Zerah Colburn.)

Note that this Erie is about twice the size of the 4-5 (Locobase 12527).

Boiler pressure is a Locobase estimate.


Class Orange (Locobase 12527)

Data from Angus Sinclair, Development of the Locomotive Engine (New York: Angus Sinclair Publishing, 1907), p.266. (Sinclair refers to the 1853 American Railway Journal article from which he derived the information to Zerah Colburn.)

The #5 was named Ramapo.

NB: Boiler pressure is a Locobase estimate.


Class Q / D-9 (Locobase 6016)

Data from Westing's Erie Power (1970) and tables in "The Locomotives of the New York, Lake Erie & Western Railroad", American Engineer & Railroading Journal, Vol LXVIII, No 12 (December 1894), pp. 564-566. Works numbers were 3963-3965, 3967-3968 in July 1888.

Westing says the driver diameter was 68", but the diagram accompanying the AERJ table shows 62".


Class Tioga (Locobase 12533)

Data from Angus Sinclair, Development of the Locomotive Engine (New York: Angus Sinclair Publishing, 1907), p.266. (Sinclair attributes the 1853 American Railway Journal article from which he derived the information to Zerah Colburn.) Works numbers were 344 in December 1848, 345 in January 1849, 347 in February, 351 in May.

Passenger engines built to the same specs as the Rogers engines shown in Locobase 12532, these engines were named Tioga, Chemung, Tompkins, and Seneca. This batch of locomotives were the last Baldwins to use the inside half-crank axle for turning the drivers.

Boiler pressure is a Locobase estimate.


Class X/D-11 (Locobase 9221)

Data from "New Erie Passsenger Engine", Locomotive Engineering, Volume 9, No 6 (June 1896), pp, 451-453. See also Westing's Erie Power (1970) and Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Built at the Susquehanna shops

Most of the Erie's assortment of Eight-wheelers were mixed-traffic engines, but this pair were intended for express passenger service. Its long firebox was designed to burn anthracite coal, although the firebox lay inside the frame and above the driving axles. A tall slender dome sat on the thicker of the two boiler courses and over the first driving axle. A sharp taper along the top line led forward to a more slender course with a second, smaller sand dome.

The Xs were followed three years later by four similar locomotives with bigger cylinders; see Locobase 9222.

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class10011113115119
Locobase ID12,550 12,530 12,551 12,552 12,553
RailroadErie (ERR)Erie (ERR)Erie (ERR)Erie (ERR)Erie (ERR)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class63246
Road Numbers100-10511, 13, 15113-114115-118119-124
Gauge6'6'6'6'6'
Number Built63246
BuilderRogers, Ketchum & GrosvenorSwinburne, Smith & CoTauntonTauntonBoston Locomotive Works
Year18511848185118511851
Valve Gear
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft)
Engine Wheelbase (ft)
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)
Weight on Drivers (lbs)37,40031,000
Engine Weight (lbs)57,50050,90058,06052,675
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)
Tender Water Capacity (gals)
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons)
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)3126
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)7254606060
Boiler Pressure (psi)100100100100100
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)17" x 20"17" x 20"17" x 20"18" x 20"16" x 26"
Tractive Effort (lbs)68249098818891809429
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 5.48 3.29
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)80.6768.50909083.50
Grate Area (sq ft)15.5012.8816.5016.1315.75
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)85310231029947876
Superheating Surface (sq ft)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)85310231029947876
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume162.35194.70195.84160.77144.78
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation15501288165016131575
Same as above plus superheater percentage15501288165016131575
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area80676850900090008350
Power L128692339281523722138
Power MT338.24304.10

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class1331414218209
Locobase ID12,554 12,531 12,555 12,532 9315
RailroadErie (ERR)Erie (ERR)Erie (ERR)Erie (ERR)Erie (ERR)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class37254
Road Numbers133-13514-16, 36-39142-14318-19, 28-29, 32209-212
Gauge6'6'6'6'6'
Number Built37254
BuilderNew Jersey LocomotiveSwinburne, Smith & CoEssex CompanyRogers, Ketchum & GrosvenorNew Jersey Locomotive
Year18511848185218481855
Valve Gear
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft)
Engine Wheelbase (ft)
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)
Weight on Drivers (lbs)27,90036,45035,75040,100
Engine Weight (lbs)50,98059,90058,25056,50066,100
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)41,500
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)107,600
Tender Water Capacity (gals)
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons)
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)23303033
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)6060547260
Boiler Pressure (psi)100100100100130
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)16" x 20"17" x 20"17" x 20"17" x 20"17" x 24"
Tractive Effort (lbs)725381889098682412,774
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.41 4.01 5.24 3.14
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)54.2559.5076.6767.50
Grate Area (sq ft)12.1312.13161310.38
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)72510141103990
Superheating Surface (sq ft)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)72510141103990
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume155.77192.99209.93188.42
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation12131213160013001349
Same as above plus superheater percentage12131213160013001349
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area5425595076676750
Power L12141249625463032
Power MT394.46307.98373.95

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class4048526466
Locobase ID12,536 12,537 12,539 12,541 12,543
RailroadErie (ERR)Erie (ERR)Erie (ERR)Erie (ERR)Erie (ERR)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class61321
Road Numbers40-454852-5464-6566
Gauge6'6'6'6'6'
Number Built61321
BuilderRogers, Ketchum & GrosvenorSwinburne, Smith & CoHinkleyRogers, Ketchum & GrosvenorRogers, Ketchum & Grosvenor
Year18491849184918501850
Valve Gear
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft)
Engine Wheelbase (ft)
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)
Weight on Drivers (lbs)32,00032,10030,05035,600
Engine Weight (lbs)56,00050,70047,92055,60056,500
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)
Tender Water Capacity (gals)
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons)
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)27272530
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)6060606072
Boiler Pressure (psi)100100100100100
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)17" x 20"16" x 20"15" x 20"17" x 20"17" x 20"
Tractive Effort (lbs)81887253637581886824
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.91 4.43 4.71 4.35
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)61.5060.2559.5057.6775.50
Grate Area (sq ft)13131013.2514
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)984845771853948
Superheating Surface (sq ft)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)984845771853948
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume187.28181.56188.48162.35180.43
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation13001300100013251400
Same as above plus superheater percentage13001300100013251400
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area61506025595057677550
Power L124582463261221723027
Power MT338.68338.32383.26269.01

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class708490A / D-1A / D-16
Locobase ID12,542 12,545 12,549 359 9227
RailroadErie (ERR)Erie (ERR)Erie (ERR)New York, Lake Erie & Western (ERR)New York, Pennsylvania & Ohio (ERR)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class22103011
Road Numbers70-7184-8590-99409-419
Gauge6'6'6'StdStd
Number Built22103011
BuilderSwinburne, Smith & CoNorrisBoston Locomotive WorksseveralErie
Year18501851185118801881
Valve GearStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft) 8.50 8.50
Engine Wheelbase (ft)23.0422.96
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.37 0.37
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)46.3746.21
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)26,50029,010
Weight on Drivers (lbs)33,90038,95030,84051,50055,760
Engine Weight (lbs)53,00057,45049,51080,70085,400
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)77,00077,000
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)157,700162,400
Tender Water Capacity (gals)36003600
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons) 8.908
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)2832264346
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)7284666868
Boiler Pressure (psi)100100100130140
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)17" x 20"14" x 32"16" x 20"18" x 22"18" x 24"
Tractive Effort (lbs)68246347659411,58313,608
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.97 6.14 4.68 4.45 4.10
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)71.2554.5062.67108105
Grate Area (sq ft)13.5011.50101716
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)102076378211201109
Superheating Surface (sq ft)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)102076378211201109
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume194.13133.83168.02172.85156.89
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation13501150100022102240
Same as above plus superheater percentage13501150100022102240
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area71255450626714,04014,700
Power L131432543258937753668
Power MT408.80287.87370.15323.20290.05

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassA / D-2B / D-3BradfordCA & CE / D-17D-12
Locobase ID360 361 12,534 9226 9223
RailroadNew York, Lake Erie & Western (ERR)New York, Lake Erie & Western (ERR)Erie (ERR)Erie (ERR)Erie (ERR)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class37904376
Road Numbers22, 24-26461-466
GaugeStdStd6'StdStd
Number Built37904376
BuilderErieseveralM W BaldwinErieErie
Year18821879184918741899
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft) 8.50 8.508 8.50
Engine Wheelbase (ft)22.9222.2922.2523.62
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.37 0.38 0.36 0.36
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)45.9245.2945.7551.63
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)28,30026,40026,15044,000
Weight on Drivers (lbs)55,40051,30032,60050,15087,325
Engine Weight (lbs)84,40079,10054,50080,000135,525
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)77,00077,00077,000116,800
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)161,400156,100157,000252,325
Tender Water Capacity (gals)3600360036006000
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons) 8.908812
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)4643274273
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)6862606876
Boiler Pressure (psi)130130100140180
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)18" x 22"18" x 22"17" x 20"17" x 24"18" x 26"
Tractive Effort (lbs)11,58312,704818812,13816,959
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.78 4.04 3.98 4.13 5.15
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)114.5011160104140
Grate Area (sq ft)262612.881527
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)105010609989331704
Superheating Surface (sq ft)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)105010609989331704
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume162.05163.59189.94147.98222.52
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation33803380128821004860
Same as above plus superheater percentage33803380128821004860
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area14,88514,430600014,56025,200
Power L136893348247036577158
Power MT293.60287.76334.07321.53361.42

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassD-13 / E B ThomasD-14D-15D-18D-4
Locobase ID9217 9224 9225 9228 362
RailroadNew York, Lake Erie & Western (ERR)Erie (ERR)Erie (ERR)Erie & Wyoming Valley (ERR)Erie (ERR)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class112272
Road Numbers499469329-33026-27/103-104/114-115
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built1272
BuilderCookeCookeERRBurnham, Williams & Coseveral
Year18931897189718871874
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft) 8.50 8.50 8.50 7.50
Engine Wheelbase (ft)23.5622.9223.3321.67
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.36 0.37 0.36 0.35
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)49.6947.2547.6746.42
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)51,28042,10043,50037,050
Weight on Drivers (lbs)88,75082,60086,00073,05047,350
Engine Weight (lbs)134,600129,500128,200104,70074,000
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)87,90087,90087,90074,000
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)222,500217,400216,100178,700
Tender Water Capacity (gals)4500450045003600
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons)9995
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)7469726139
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)7268686262
Boiler Pressure (psi)160180180140130
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)19" x 26"17.5" x 24"17.5" x 22"18" x 24"17" x 24"
Tractive Effort (lbs)17,72916,53815,15914,92512,362
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 5.01 4.99 5.67 4.89 3.83
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)187125152146
Grate Area (sq ft)36.3068686817
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)1894135013921118930
Superheating Surface (sq ft)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)1894135013921118930
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume221.98202.06227.28158.16147.50
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation580812,24012,24095202210
Same as above plus superheater percentage580812,24012,24095202210
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area29,92022,50027,36020,440
Power L16366603071683782
Power MT316.27321.89367.51228.28

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassD-5 - rebuilt simpleD-6/D-7 - compound rebuildD-6/D-7 - simple, D flueD-6/D-7 - simple, strt flueD-7 - large tubes
Locobase ID363 6695 6697 6696 9218
RailroadErie (ERR)Erie (ERR)Erie (ERR)Erie (ERR)Erie (ERR)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class1232
Road Numbers385329-376, 386329-330
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built12
BuilderBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoshopsshopsBurnham, Williams & Co
Year18961897190419041897
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft) 8.50 8.50 8.50 8.50 8.50
Engine Wheelbase (ft)22.922323.3323.3322.83
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.37 0.37 0.36 0.36 0.37
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)47.2547.6747.6747.67
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)38,50039,60042,50042,50044,990
Weight on Drivers (lbs)75,00078,00084,30084,30087,330
Engine Weight (lbs)111,000121,000125,700125,700125,300
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)87,90087,90087,90087,90087,900
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)198,900208,900213,600213,600213,200
Tender Water Capacity (gals)45004500450045004500
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons)99999
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)6365707073
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)6868686872
Boiler Pressure (psi)180180180180180
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)17.5" x 22"12.5" x 22"17.5" x 22"17.5" x 22"12.5" x 22"
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)21" x 22"21" x 22"
Tractive Effort (lbs)15,15911,42215,15915,15910,787
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.95 6.83 5.56 5.56 8.10
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)163163127128123
Grate Area (sq ft)68686867.8068
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)14581458132016361325
Superheating Surface (sq ft)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)14581458132016361325
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume238.06466.59215.53267.12424.03
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation12,24012,24012,24012,20412,240
Same as above plus superheater percentage12,24012,24012,24012,20412,240
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area29,34029,34022,86023,04022,140
Power L175715258651275814751
Power MT445.10297.23340.60396.52239.88

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassD-7 - simple, combustion chbrD-9GenesseeK / D-8M / D-10
Locobase ID9219 9222 12,535 6014 9220
RailroadErie (ERR)New York, Pennsylvania & Ohio (ERR)Erie (ERR)New York, Lake Erie & Western (ERR)New York, Lake Erie & Western (ERR)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class52512
Road Numbers23, 38, 43, 45, 51/300, 304-307/420-42430-31401-405305-316/470-481
GaugeStdStd6'StdStd
Number Built52512
BuildershopsRogersRogers, Ketchum & GrosvenorErieErie
Year18971888184918831887
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft) 8.50 8.50 8.50
Engine Wheelbase (ft)22.8323.4623.46
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.37 0.36 0.36
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)48.3746.7948.92
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)44,90033,00036,90040,600
Weight on Drivers (lbs)86,50065,40033,50072,60080,400
Engine Weight (lbs)125,900106,60054,500103,600117,400
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)87,90077,00077,00077,000
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)213,800183,600180,600194,400
Tender Water Capacity (gals)4500360036003600
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons)98 8.908
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)7255286167
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)6868606868
Boiler Pressure (psi)180150100140145
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)17.5" x 22"18" x 24"17" x 20"18" x 22"19" x 24"
Tractive Effort (lbs)15,15914,580818812,47415,704
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 5.71 4.49 4.09 5.82 5.12
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)15313261.50158179
Grate Area (sq ft)6817133240
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)1437146398415031649
Superheating Surface (sq ft)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)1437146398415031649
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume234.63206.97187.28231.96209.38
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation12,2402550130044805800
Same as above plus superheater percentage12,2402550130044805800
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area27,54019,800615022,12025,955
Power L173355106245856155308
Power MT373.89344.24323.52341.02291.10

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassMonroeOrangeQ / D-9TiogaX/D-11
Locobase ID12,528 12,527 6016 12,533 9221
RailroadErie (ERR)Erie (ERR)New York, Pennsylvania & Ohio (ERR)Erie (ERR)New York, Lake Erie & Western (ERR)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class12552
Road Numbers104-523, 38, 43, 45, 5120-21, 23, 27500-501
Gauge6'6'Std6'Std
Number Built12552
BuilderNorrisNorrisRogersM W BaldwinErie
Year18471841188818481896
Valve GearStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft) 8.50 8.50
Engine Wheelbase (ft)25.4623.46
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.33 0.36
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)48.7949.83
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)32,40050,000
Weight on Drivers (lbs)26,88021,00065,40034,80090,250
Engine Weight (lbs)43,92030,700106,60056,500133,550
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)77,00087,900
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)183,600221,450
Tender Water Capacity (gals)36004500
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons) 8.909
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)2218552975
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)6055627276
Boiler Pressure (psi)100100150100180
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)12.38" x 26"10.75" x 18"18" x 24"17" x 20"19" x 24"
Tractive Effort (lbs)5645321515,991682417,442
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.76 6.53 4.09 5.10 5.17
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)543313265.75172
Grate Area (sq ft)10 7.501712.8836.50
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)762376145310041762
Superheating Surface (sq ft)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)762376145310041762
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume210.36198.85205.56191.09223.72
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation1000750255012886570
Same as above plus superheater percentage1000750255012886570
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area5400330019,800657530,960
Power L128492623463330447591
Power MT467.33550.74312.35385.68370.86

Reference


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