Arkansas & Louisiana / Arkansas Midland / Denver, Memphis & Atlantic / Houston, Central Arkansas & Northern / International & Great Northern / Kansas City, Wyandotte & Northwestern / Little Rock, Mississippi River & Texas / Midland Pennsylvania / Missouri Pacific / Saint Louis, Brownsville & Mexico / Saint Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern / Union Pacific-Central Branch / Wabash, Chester & Western 4-4-0 "American" Locomotives of the USA


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class 1 (Locobase 10057)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

According to the New York Locomotive Works records compiled by J F Webber, this locomotive was delivered either to the KCW&NW as their #4 (works number 287) or the A & L as #2 (works number 197). Locobase chose the latter origin for the following reasons:

1) The 1924 MP book showed an identical engine, also bought in 1910, for which the original builder was not supplied, and

2) Webber lists the A & L #1 as immediately preceding the one we do know, but does not give a wheel arrangement.

The A & L began life in 1876-1877 as the narrow-gauge Washington & Hope Railway, which connected with the St Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern near St Louis. Reorganized and now tasked with completing a line to Monroe, La, the A & L was converted to standard gauge in 1882. It later was ruled to be a branch line of the St L, IM & S.

NB: The direct heating surface (including the firebox heating surface) is an estimate calculated by subtracting the calculated tube heating surface from the reported total evaporative heating surface.


Class 1 (Locobase 11619)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Vol 15, p. 79. See also MP 7 - 1902 General Description of Locomotives (dated 10 July 1902) supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works number was 9943 in April 1889.

When the Reynolds & Henry Construction Company applied to Baldwin to buy a new locomotive for the soon-to-open Ouachita Valley Route, the Philadelphia builder pulled the design just recently used for the Rio Grande & Eagle Pass (Locobase 11592) and copied it. to the last quarter inch of tube length.

The OVR didn't remain independent for long before being sold to the St Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern (a principal component of the Missouri Pacific) on 13 December 1893. Its route opened the way to Houston.

On page 20-21 of the 1902 General Description, an HCA&N #1 from Baldwin appears in the tally. Sparse data conforms for the most part with the data from the Baldwin specs, but the weights are given as 60,000 lb adhesion and 84,000 lb total engine and the tube count is 180. Given the engine's relative youth, Locobase doubts that this disparity was a product of a rebuild.


Class 1 (Locobase 12711)

Data from DeGolyer, Volume 27, p. 28. Works numbers were 24093, 24098, 24118 in April 1904.

These were the first locomotives bought for the StLB&M, an eastern Texas railroad that opened its first section, 142 miles (229 km) between Robstown and Brownsville, on 4 July 1904. Extending north toward Houston, the StB&M owned and operated 502 miles (808 km) of main lin by 1912.

926 was scrapped after a relatively short career in April 1919 before the other two were superheated; see Locobase 7764.


Class 1/E-64 (Locobase 10063)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works number was 1101-1103 (March 1886), 1136, 1138-1139 (August 1886).

Another of the grandly named railroads that blossomed across the Midwest in the late 1800s, the DM&A never even entered service as an independent railway. The Missouri Pacific bought the line in 1887. #4 was named Chatauqua, #5 Crowell, and #6 Sumner.


Class 101/E64 (Locobase 6729)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive and Robert Lehmuth's Rogers Locomotive building list, all supplied in May 2005 and August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works numbers were 2572-2574, 2577 in February 1880; 2578, 2580 in March

Fortunately for future railroad historians and ferro-equinologists (and database compilers), the 1924 edition of the Missouri Pacific diagrams included several of Eight-wheelers from well before the turn of the century.

Of the two pages in the book describing this design, the first example was marked "Scrapped 10/24" on the original document. The locomotives came from the heyday of the 4-4-0 and still featured the one steam dome over the firebox and one over the center of the boiler as well as a very straight and tall stack. Rogers delivered the locomotive that would be 2502 in 1880, the others the very next year.


Class 11 (Locobase 12737)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 27, p. 167 and 41, p. 132. Works numbers were 37393 in December 1911 and 39484 in March 1913.

See more about the WC & W in Locobase 12736. This Illinois railroad apparently needed some passenger power and bought these two Eight-wheelers from Baldwin. After the WC & W's demise in 1927, its successor Chester & Mount Vernon took over both.


Class 20 (Locobase 10058)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works number 941.

Small Eight-wheelers that were among the earliest St L, IM & S engines. G M Best's compilation of Grant locomotives gives us the original builder's number for 20, but cannot help us with any others because of unavoidable gaps in information. See Locobase 10059 for a passenger-engine variant.


Class 28/371-382 (Locobase 10059)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works numbers for Grant locomotives are quite uncertain.

In the same year that Grant delivered the mixed-traffic Eight-wheeler shown in 10058, the Paterson, NJ builder supplied similar locomotives with slightly smaller grates and taller drivers as passenger engines.


Class 312/8551 (Locobase 6731)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works numbers were 3043, 3045, 3048-3050 in July 1882

Fortunately for future railroad historians and ferro-equinologists (and database compilers), the 1924 edition of the Missouri Pacific diagrams included several of Eight-wheelers from well before the turn of the century.

The lower drivers mark this as a mostly freight engine of somewhat smaller dimensions than the other 4-4-0s in the book from the same era.


Class 327/8562/E58 (Locobase 6732)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works numbers were 1350-1354 in March 1883

Fortunately for future railroad historians and ferro-equinologists (and database compilers), the 1924 edition of the Missouri Pacific diagrams included several of Eight-wheelers from well before the turn of the century.

This is a repeat of the 1882 Rhode Island engine (see Locobase 6730) with the boiler pressed to a higher level.


Class 4 (Locobase 10066)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works number was 267.

Although apparently similar to the Baldwins purchased at the same time (Locobase 10064), this single Rome, NY product had more tubes.


Class 5 (Locobase 10062)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works number was 2311 in July 1873.

This engines first went to the Indianapolis, Bloomington & Western as their #72, but was returned to Rogers. The next railroad, the UP-CB was first established as the Atchison & Pike's Peak and was adopted by the UP as their Central Branch. The UP-CB renumbered the 5 as 184 in July 1879.

The UP sold the CB to the Kansas Pacific in the 1880s. When the MoPac took over the KP, it took over this engine as well.

Locobase wonders about the specification for evaporative heating surface shown for this stray Eight-wheeler. By tube count and length and allowing for a typical firebox, the figure should be closer to 1,000 sq ft.


Class 5 (Locobase 10068)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works numbers were 619-620 in March 1880), 633-636 in October, 639-642 in February 1881.

These high-boilered Masons had several numbers and at least one name each as follows:

LR, MR & T StL, IM & S MP

5 ZEB WARD 620 8815

6 WILLIAM MASON 621 8816

7 PINE BLUFF 622 8817

8 LITTLE ROCK 623 8818

9 VARNER 624 8819

10 ARKANSAS CITY 625

11 COLLINS 626

12 MONTICELLO 627 8820

625 may have been scrapped before the class came under MP control. 626 was sold to locomotive rebuilder/reseller Southern Iron & Equipment, which found a buyer in the Rankin Lumber Company in Mars Bluff, South Carolina.


Class 6 (Locobase 10070)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines, as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 21, p. 276. Works 14524 later took road number 8848.

Locobase isn't sure these are the engines operated first by the Arkansas Midland. For one thing, the dates shown in Connelly's list are all over the map as are the works numbers 12842 in July 1892, 14524 in November 1895, 16268 in October 1898, 17199 in October 1899.

But 3 of them were later credited to the International Great Northern and renumbered twice before receiving MP road numbers 8826 (works 12832), 8827 (works 16268), and 8828 (works 17199).

NB: The direct heating surface (including the firebox heating surface) is an estimate calculated by subtracting the calculated tube heating surface from the reported total evaporative heating surface.


Class 6, 2 (Locobase 10064)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams and MP 7 - 1902 General Description of Locomotives supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.See also DeGolyer, Volume 14, p. 54. Works numbers were 8909-8910, 8912, 8915-8916 (7, 6, 8-10) in November 1887 and 9455 (2) and 9459 (3) in September 1888. The lone New York Locomotive was works number 267 and bore road number 4. It was renumbered 8745 by the Missouri Pacific.

See 10041 for a brief description of this KC-based railway. These engines were ordered by the Northwestern Construction Company. The original spec prescribed 180 tubes of similar length, so one can estimate that the evaporative heating surface was about 1,160 sq ft.

When the KC&NW was absorbed by the Missouri Pacific in 1894, this class went along. Most were scrapped more than two decades later, but 8728 wound up in the Kaw River sometime before 1910.

NB: The direct heating surface (including the firebox heating surface) is an estimate calculated by subtracting the calculated tube heating surface from the reported total evaporative heating surface.


Class 698 / E-62 (Locobase 6733)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Compared to the others in the 1924 book, this 4-4-0 class is bigger, but not remarkably more powerful. The first 10 were built by Baldwin in August 1895 (works numbers 14373-14382) with MoPac adding two from its own shops in 1897-1898.

The class was delivered with 62" drivers (tractive effort of 19,190 lb, factor of adhesion 4.17), but sometime later all received 69" wheels that better suited them to light passenger service.


Class 72 / 407 / 8803 (Locobase 10067)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works numbers 1238-1244.in 1879.

Slightly jumbled septet from Grant in this year. Some had 138 tubes and measured 11 1/2" over the tube sheets while others had 140 tubes that were 3 inches shorter. What Locobase finds most interesting is the small cylinder volume and light weight.

When the St L, IM & S was taken in by the Missouri Pacific, the five survivors (ex-72-75 and 79) were renumbered 8803-8807.


Class 8509 (Locobase 6730)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Fortunately for future railroad historians and ferro-equinologists (and database compilers), the 1924 edition of the Missouri Pacific diagrams included several of Eight-wheelers from well before the turn of the century.

Using the same power dimensions as the earlier Rogers engines (see Locobase 6729), the design shown here featured a few more boiler tubes and a larger grate. Three of the four delivered are shown on a page that has an indistinct builder's credit. It may have been Rhode Island as well.


Class 8631 (Locobase 10054)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Locobase doesn't know if this was a 1-only


Class 8653 (Locobase 10055)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

This may have been an early experiment in oil-firing. The engine was a typical early '90s Eight-wheeler with passenger-sized drivers, but in place of a coal grate, the MoPac had an oil burning system fitted. So, quite properly, the specifications have the words "oil burner" in place of an area measurement.


Class 8654 (Locobase 10056)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

NB: Reported total heating surface is 127 sq ft less than the calculated tube heating surface.


Class 8710 (Locobase 10061)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

This particular boiler area-grate area combination was a common sight on the MP for some reason and various builders produced batches of slightly varying designs to the specifications for well over a decade.


Class 8714 (Locobase 10060)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Lightweight Eight-wheeler for its time, the 8714 served the MP for 33 years before being scrapped in October 1924.

NB: The direct heating surface (including the firebox heating surface) is an estimate calculated by subtracting the calculated tube heating surface from the reported total evaporative heating surface.


Class 8736 (Locobase 10065)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Similar in size to the Rogers bought in the same year (10060), this home-built had a 30-year+ operating life on the MP.


Class 8821 (Locobase 10069)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

8823 had 162 2" tubes that were 10 ft 8 in long over the tube sheets.

NB: The direct heating surface (including the firebox heating surface) is an estimate calculated by subtracting the calculated tube heating surface from the reported total evaporative heating surface.


Class Cantabogue (Locobase 6885)

Data from IGN 2 - 1923 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also the Handbook of Texas online at http://www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online/articles/II/esp4.html (accessed 2 September 2005) for information on the I&GN.

This was among the first locomotives for this Texas railroad, which first saw life in 1873 as the consolidation of the International Railroad Company and the Houston & Great Northern. The latter actually ordered the Cantabogue in 1872. Other H&GN locomotives from Rogers with identical cylinder volume and driver diameter were Trinity #2 (works 1823), Gen. Robert Avery #8 and Sam Houston #9 (works 1996-1997), and Crockett #14 (works 2138). At the same time, the IRRoT took delivery of similar engines: Sabine #5 (works 1943), Trinity #8 (works 2018), Red River #10 (works 2034), Gaudaloupe #12 (works 2042), Jefferson #19 (works 2189), and Cherokee #22 (works 2192).

Through financial panics, a term of ownership by the noted (and notorious) speculator and baron Jay Gould, bankruptcies and the like, the I&GN extended its reach from its original core of the Houston-Palestine and Houston-East Columbia lines.

By 1911, the I&GN had grown to 1,106 miles and served most of the Lone Star State. In 1923, the Missouri Pacific sought to block the Missouri-Kansas-Texas by arranging for the New Orleans, Texas & Mexico to buy the I & GN. A year later, the MP bought the NO, T & M and the merger was completed.


Class E - 67 - 17.8 (Locobase 7764)

Data from MP SUBS 7 - 1935 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

A trio of Eight-wheelers was delivered in 1904 as shown in Locobase 12711, but only two were superheated. The boiler modification consisted only of removing 114 small tubes in favor of installing 18 superheater flues and replacing the slide valves with 8" piston valves.


Class E 16/24 52A (Locobase 6886)

Data from IGN 2 - 1923 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Produced later than many other 4-4-0s, these home-builts were quite small and light, probably to serve branch lines. The tender's oil-fuel capacity was rated at 44 barrels (1,848 US gallons).


Class E 16/24 56A (Locobase 6785)

Data from IGN 2 - 1923 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

This IGN-built locomotive appears to have been copied from the earlier Rogers locomotives. But Locobase notes that with two fewer fire tubes, the IGN somehow gained 87 sq ft of tube area. Hmmmmm ...


Class E 16/24 58A (Locobase 6784)

Data from IGN 2 - 1923 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Locobase 6729 profiles some Rogers Eight-wheelers delivered to the IGN in the same year, but these are slightly different in their boiler dimensions. Locobase thinks they represent a different order.


Class E 18/24 68C (Locobase 6887)

Data from IGN 2 - 1923 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Tender capacity is expressed in either tons of coal or barrels of oil, in this case 44 bbl. As Eight-wheelers went in the early 1890s, this mixed-traffic class had relatively big boilers, but grates of about average size supporting quite small fireboxes. The tender's oil-fuel capacity was rated at 44 barrels (1,848 US gallons). Given the small drivers and cylinders, these were never intended for speed, but for regular local service.

Two of the class (105-106) were built along somewhat different lines and delivered in 1890; see Locobase 6888.


Class E 18/24 68C - 180 (Locobase 6888)

Data from IGN 2 - 1923 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Within the set of Eight-wheelers of average power -- Locobase 6887 -- reposed these two supercharged ponies. The boiler pressure was set 30 psi higher, the boiler was slightly smaller, but the grate a little bigger and the firebox significantly larger. It's possible that the others were set at 150 psi because the higher tractive effort of this pair must have left them slippery little devils.

The tender's oil-fuel capacity was rated at 44 barrels (1,848 US gallons).


Class E 18/24 68C - small (Locobase 6889)

Data from IGN 2 - 1923 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Locobase 6887-6888 show the others that shared the same class ID, but this pair was clearly a different brand from the others. It seems to have been built to the same template as an earlier home-built (Locobase 6785), but had larger cylinders and more adhesion weight. The tender's oil-fuel capacity was rated at 44 barrels (1,848 US gallons).


Class E-63 - 15.0 (Locobase 7769)

Data from MP SUBS 7 - 1935 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 27, p. 192. (Thanks to Chris Hohl for his 30 May 2016 email describing the "as-built" tender specifications and noting a higher pressure and a smaller driver diameter.) Works numbers were 25056-25059, 25063, 25107 in February 1905 and 27092, 27095-27096 in December.

These small Eight-wheelers were delivered with equipment supplied to Baldwin from the following suppliers:

Tower couplers

Pyle-National electric headlights

Monitor injectors

Ajax journal bearings

Richardson valve rod packings

Baldwin standard safety valves

Leach sanding devices

Detroit sight-feed lubricators

Safety steam heat equipment

Midvale driving and truck wheel tires

Chris Hohl notes that the "as-built" tenders carried 4,350 US gallons of water (16,465 litres) and 2,370 gallons (8,970 litres) of oil; its loaded weight was 90,000 lbs. The driver diameter was 62" (1,575 mm) and the boiler pressure was 180 psi (12.4 bar).

In addtion, Locobase notes a comment on the combustion system: "Fire box equipped with Best's latest improved oil burner allowing sufficient space between the deck plate and burner to admit of easy access in feeding." One difference between the Best design and the more typical Van Boden installation may be that it was "inverted". The company was headquarter just across the Hudson River from Manhattan inWest New York, NJ.

And, because it was an oil burner, the engine had a flash wall in lieu of brick arch in fire box. Details followed: "Flash wall located 5 feet (1.52 m) from the mouth of the burner." And the bottom two feet (610 mm) above the mud ring of the firebox was lined with fire brick.

6-8 and 11 were taken into the Missouri Pacific in 1925 as E-63 class 910-913; by that time, the tube count in the boilers had dropped to 174 and evaporative heating surface area measured 1,114 sq ft.. In addition, the railroad had dropped the locomotives' boiler pressure setting and fitted the drivers with thicker tires. 912 was sold immediately, presumably for scrap.

9 -10 and 12-14 went to the San Benito & Rio Grande Valley in 1921. This gives Locobase the opportunity to describe this little railway, thanks to the the Cameron County Historical Commission's website http://www.cameroncountyhistoricalcommission.org/ValleyHistory.htm, accessed 30 July 2006.

Located in a triangle bounded by the Gulf of Mexico and the country of Mexico, the SB&RGV received its first push from St Louis-San Francisco Railroad-backed interests whose agent was Sam Robertson. Robertson purchased some "junk locomotives and cars" from George Dilley in Palestine in 1910. Also known as the Spider Web or "Sam Robertson's Back Door Railroad", various lines and loops were added until in 1916, the SB & RVG owned 75 miles of track and 2 locomotives. The Frisco entered receivership that year, which pulled the SB & RGV in as well. At that point, the NOT&M bought the SB&RVG and brought its locomotives with it.

The trio of StLB&M engines in this entry went to the still independently operated railway sometime after 1921, then to the Missouri Pacific in 1925.


Class J E Bradford (Locobase 6728)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works numbers were 826-827.

Fortunately for future railroad historians and ferro-equinologists (and database compilers), the 1924 edition of the Missouri Pacific diagrams included several of Eight-wheelers from well before the turn of the century.

Among the earliest of the MoPac predecessors was the StLIM&S and these were among its first locomotives. The second of the pair took the name Little Rock. The 10 was off the rolls before the MoPac assigned it a number. The MP retained one of them long enough to renumber it twice.


Class T E Herrick (Locobase 14328)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 53, pp. 250+. Works number was 41653 in August 1914.

This Millersville, Pa, short line didn't temporize on the passenger power, selecting a relatively high drivered American to pull its modest service. It was the third #1 ordered by the MPRR. The first two were resold before delivery to the Missouri & North Arkansas (Locobase 13268) and the Tremont & Gulf (Locobase 12894).

The third locomotive fared little better. A year after it was built for the MP, Baldwin repossessed the 1 in December 1915. Then the 1 went to Toledo Detroit, which leased the engine to the Detroit, Toledo & Ironton as their 16. The DT&I ran the 16 for about 13 years before selling it in 1928. Only two years later, the 16 became of the first American steam locomotives to leave service to go on display at the Ford Museum in Dearborn, Mich. There the engine reposed for 50 years until it was traded to the Illinois Railway Museum in 1980.

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class1111/E-64101/E64
Locobase ID10,057 11,619 12,711 10,063 6729
RailroadArkansas & Louisiana (MP)Houston, Central Arkansas & Northern (MP)Saint Louis, Brownsville & Mexico (MP)Denver, Memphis & Atlantic (MP)Missouri Pacific (MP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class21367
Road Numbers1-2 / 858-865911-3/925-9271-6/983-988/8720-8725101-106/272-274/8501-8504, 8716-8717
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built21367
BuilderNew YorkBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoBrooksRogers
Year18861889190418861880
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft)8 9.088 9.25
Engine Wheelbase (ft)21.7524.2922.6223.08
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.37 0.37 0.35 0.40
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)44.9647.22
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)
Weight on Drivers (lbs)67,60045,20072,50052,00058,000
Engine Weight (lbs)103,40072,500113,00078,00088,000
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)137,00078,00064,000
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)250,000156,000152,000
Tender Water Capacity (gals)50002200600028003000
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons)7218079
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)5638604348
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)6962686464
Boiler Pressure (psi)150130180140140
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)18" x 26"16" x 24"18" x 24"17" x 24"19" x 22"
Tractive Effort (lbs)15,56610,95017,49612,89714,767
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.34 4.13 4.14 4.03 3.93
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)98149.60102108.80
Grate Area (sq ft)17.5015.5018.7015.5017
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)1414168610921147
Superheating Surface (sq ft)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)1414168610921147
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume184.65238.52173.20158.88
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation26252015336621702380
Same as above plus superheater percentage26252015336621702380
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area14,70026,92814,28015,232
Power L14289702537943498
Power MT279.75427.24321.70265.92

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class112028/371-382312/8551327/8562/E58
Locobase ID12,737 10,058 10,059 6731 6732
RailroadWabash, Chester & Western (MP)Saint Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern (MP)Saint Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern (MP)Missouri Pacific (MP)Missouri Pacific (MP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class25855
Road Numbers11, 1420/220/871/87018701-8708312- /8551-8555327-331/8562-8566
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built25855
BuilderBaldwinGrantGrantRogersRhode Island
Year19111872187218821883
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft) 9.08 9.50 9.50
Engine Wheelbase (ft)23.0823.2923.17
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.39 0.41 0.41
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)47.7545.8347.42
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)
Weight on Drivers (lbs)67,00048,00048,00056,00058,000
Engine Weight (lbs)104,00072,00072,00086,00088,000
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)70,00064,00064,00062,00062,000
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)174,000136,000136,000148,000150,000
Tender Water Capacity (gals)35002900240030003000
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons)6 7.50
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)5640404748
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)6263695864
Boiler Pressure (psi)180140140140145
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)17" x 24"17" x 24"17" x 24"19" x 22"19" x 22"
Tractive Effort (lbs)17,11613,10111,96216,29515,295
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.91 3.66 4.01 3.44 3.79
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)138125121
Grate Area (sq ft)1815.3014.1019.7020.20
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)14651031103111081206
Superheating Surface (sq ft)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)14651031103111081206
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume232.36163.52163.52153.47167.05
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation32402142197427582929
Same as above plus superheater percentage32402142197427582929
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area24,84017,50017,545
Power L1635732493880
Power MT418.35255.81294.96

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class45566, 2
Locobase ID10,066 10,062 10,068 10,070 10,064
RailroadKansas City, Wyandotte & Northwestern (MP)Union Pacific-Central Branch (MP)Little Rock, Mississippi River & Texas (MP)Arkansas Midland (MP)Kansas City, Wyandotte & Northwestern (MP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class11845
Road Numbers4 / 87455/184/8719/87195-12 / 8815-88206-9 / 8824, 8826-88286-10, 2-3/8727-8732, 8748-8749
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built11845
BuilderNew YorkRogersWilliam MasonBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Parry, Williams & Co
Year18871879188018921887
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft)88
Engine Wheelbase (ft)21.6722.42
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.37 0.36
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)44.1944.50
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)
Weight on Drivers (lbs)50,00048,00040,00051,40048,000
Engine Weight (lbs)78,00066,00068,00078,00078,000
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)88,00066,00038,00058,00090,000
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)166,000132,000106,000136,000168,000
Tender Water Capacity (gals)34003000200029003600
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons)
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)4240334340
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)636362.7562.7564
Boiler Pressure (psi)140140140140140
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)17" x 24"17" x 24"16" x 24"16" x 24"17" x 24"
Tractive Effort (lbs)13,10113,10111,65211,65212,897
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.82 3.66 3.43 4.41 3.72
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)115.50135
Grate Area (sq ft)16.6013.7015.5015.3016.90
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)1092776109210311092
Superheating Surface (sq ft)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)1092776109210311092
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume173.20123.08195.52184.60173.20
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation23241918217021422366
Same as above plus superheater percentage23241918217021422366
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area16,17018,900
Power L142174185
Power MT361.75384.43

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class698 / E-6272 / 407 / 8803850986318653
Locobase ID6733 10,067 6730 10,054 10,055
RailroadSaint Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern (MP)Saint Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern (MP)Missouri Pacific (MP)Missouri Pacific (MP)Missouri Pacific (MP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class271511
Road Numbers698-709 / 8601-861272-76, 79-80 / 407-11, 418-19/8803+8509-8511, 8562, 8564+86318653
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built271511
BuilderseveralGrantRhode IslandMissouri PacificRogers
Year18951879188218931892
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft)9 9.50 8.75 8.75
Engine Wheelbase (ft)24.0223.1724.1924.19
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.37 0.41 0.36 0.36
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)48.6047.4248.7348.73
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)
Weight on Drivers (lbs)80,00044,00058,00068,00068,000
Engine Weight (lbs)126,00072,00088,000108,000108,000
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)92,40036,00062,00074,00075,000
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)218,400108,000150,000182,000183,000
Tender Water Capacity (gals)40002400300036003000
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons)8 7.5082500
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)6737485757
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)6964646467
Boiler Pressure (psi)180140140140150
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)18" x 24"16" x 24"19" x 22"18" x 24"18" x 24"
Tractive Effort (lbs)17,24211,42414,76714,45914,798
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.64 3.85 3.93 4.70 4.60
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)160121115118
Grate Area (sq ft)1714.102016.70
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)17241031120611291573
Superheating Surface (sq ft)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)17241031120611291573
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume243.90184.60167.05159.72222.53
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation3060197428002338
Same as above plus superheater percentage3060197428002338
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area28,80016,94016,10017,700
Power L17391374636005126
Power MT407.36284.78233.43332.38

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class86548710871487368821
Locobase ID10,056 10,061 10,060 10,065 10,069
RailroadMissouri Pacific (MP)Missouri Pacific (MP)Missouri Pacific (MP)Missouri Pacific (MP)Missouri Pacific (MP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class15111
Road Numbers86548710-8713, 8716871487368821, 8823
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built15111
BuilderHinkleyRogersRogersMissouri PacificHinkley
Year18871888189118911887
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft) 8.758 8.67
Engine Wheelbase (ft)23.0822.3322.96
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.38 0.36 0.38
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)45.2747.29
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)
Weight on Drivers (lbs)78,00052,00054,00052,00050,000
Engine Weight (lbs)94,00078,00086,00078,00078,000
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)79,00064,00076,00062,00058,000
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)173,000142,000162,000140,000136,000
Tender Water Capacity (gals)40002900300036002600
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons)868
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)6543454342
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)6764646464
Boiler Pressure (psi)150140122140140
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)18" x 24"17" x 24"17" x 24"17" x 24"16" x 24"
Tractive Effort (lbs)14,79812,89711,23812,89711,424
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 5.27 4.03 4.81 4.03 4.38
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)11016512097.50
Grate Area (sq ft)16.8014.801715.2016.50
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)11801031118011801092
Superheating Surface (sq ft)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)11801031118011801092
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume166.94163.52187.15187.15195.52
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation25202072207421282310
Same as above plus superheater percentage25202072207421282310
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area15,40020,13016,80013,650
Power L13745413842164223
Power MT317.55337.88357.49372.40

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassCantabogueE - 67 - 17.8E 16/24 52AE 16/24 56AE 16/24 58A
Locobase ID6885 7764 6886 6785 6784
RailroadInternational & Great Northern (MP)Saint Louis, Brownsville & Mexico (MP)International & Great Northern (MP)International & Great Northern (MP)International & Great Northern (MP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class13512
Road Numbers12925-92722, 39, 48, 57-586042, 55
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built1512
BuilderRogersSLB&MI & GNI & GNRogers
Year18731920190418911880
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft)8 9.08999
Engine Wheelbase (ft)21.6524.2923.5824.0424.04
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.37 0.37 0.38 0.37 0.37
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)52.1743.8347.2947.29
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)
Weight on Drivers (lbs)38,00074,30052,00066,00053,000
Engine Weight (lbs)62,000118,50088,000100,00090,000
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)137,00092,00088,00073,000
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)255,500180,000188,000163,000
Tender Water Capacity (gals)16006000400040003200
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons)22180997
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)3262435544
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)5568636363
Boiler Pressure (psi)120180160155130
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)15" x 22"18" x 24"16" x 24"16" x 24"16" x 24"
Tractive Effort (lbs)918017,49613,26312,84910,776
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.14 4.25 3.92 5.14 4.92
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)72149.60100104104
Grate Area (sq ft)1318.7015.501717
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)782126093612681181
Superheating Surface (sq ft)214
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)782147493612681181
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume173.79178.25167.59227.03211.46
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation15603366248026352210
Same as above plus superheater percentage15603871248026352210
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area864030,96716,00016,12013,520
Power L1279211,354432052104157
Power MT323.96673.79366.31348.06345.83

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassE 18/24 68CE 18/24 68C - 180E 18/24 68C - smallE-63 - 15.0J E Bradford
Locobase ID6887 6888 6889 7769 6728
RailroadInternational & Great Northern (MP)International & Great Northern (MP)International & Great Northern (MP)Saint Louis, Brownsville & Mexico (MP)Saint Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern (MP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class62262
Road Numbers101-104, 107, 110105-106108-1096-11/910-912, 952-95510, 12, 14/210,212, 14/468-471/8808
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built62262
BuilderSchenectadySchenectadyI & GNBurnham, Williams & CoDanforth, Cooke
Year18921890189819051872
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft)999 8.258
Engine Wheelbase (ft)23.9623.9623.9622.2521.67
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.38 0.38 0.38 0.37 0.37
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)46.7146.7146.7153.4444.19
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)
Weight on Drivers (lbs)68,00068,00068,00058,48045,000
Engine Weight (lbs)104,000104,000104,00092,91070,000
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)88,00088,00088,000103,00048,000
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)192,000192,000192,000195,910118,000
Tender Water Capacity (gals)40004000400055002000
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons)99924666
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)5757574938
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)6362626363
Boiler Pressure (psi)150180160160145
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)18" x 24"18" x 24"18" x 24"17" x 24"16" x 24"
Tractive Effort (lbs)15,73719,18917,05714,97312,020
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.32 3.54 3.99 3.91 3.74
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)106152104119.10105
Grate Area (sq ft)1819.401716.4914.60
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)1613157812681186858
Superheating Surface (sq ft)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)1613157812681186858
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume228.19223.24179.39188.10153.62
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation27003492272026382117
Same as above plus superheater percentage27003492272026382117
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area15,90027,36016,64019,05615,225
Power L147756152418247473770
Power MT309.62398.91271.17357.91369.40

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassT E Herrick
Locobase ID14,328
RailroadMidland Pennsylvania
CountryUSA
Whyte4-4-0
Number in Class1
Road Numbers1
GaugeStd
Number Built1
BuilderBaldwin
Year1914
Valve GearStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft) 8.50
Engine Wheelbase (ft)22.58
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.38
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)49
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)
Weight on Drivers (lbs)76,000
Engine Weight (lbs)115,000
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)80,000
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)195,000
Tender Water Capacity (gals)4000
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons)6
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)63
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)68
Boiler Pressure (psi)190
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)18" x 24"
Tractive Effort (lbs)18,468
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.12
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)142
Grate Area (sq ft)29.30
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)1756
Superheating Surface (sq ft)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)1756
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume248.42
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation5567
Same as above plus superheater percentage5567
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area26,980
Power L17512
Power MT435.82

Reference