Central Vermont / Ogdensburgh & St Lawrence / Rutland / St Lawrence & Adirondack 4-4-0 "American" Locomotives of the USA


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class C-1/C-1A (Locobase 14538)

Data from Dimensions and Classifications of Locomotives of the NYC&HR et al, September 1905, p. 317-318. (Thanks to Chris Hohl for his 18 February 2015 email with an Excel attachment spelling out the various numbering systems.) Works numbers were 3511-3512 in 1891 and 4199-4200 in 1894.

The diagrams and notes state that 862 and 864 had 70" (1778 mm) drivers. Chris Hohl's table showed Locobase that the C-1 engines originally came from the Adirondack & St Lawrence and were numbered 232-233. They were renumbered 182-183 in 1901, 862-863 by the New York Central in 1905. 1901. In 1913, the Rutland renumbered the two 82-83. The C-1As first operated on the Bennington & Rutland as 14-15. In 1901, they took 180-181, wore 864-865 when the New York Central took control in 1905, and were awarded 84-85 by the Rut.


Class C-1B (Locobase 14539)

Data from Dimensions and Classifications of Locomotives of the NYC&HR et al, September 1905, p. 319-320. (Many thanks to Chris Hohl for his 18 February 2015 email and spreadsheet noting all of the road number changes for this class.) Works numbers were 4550-4551 in 1897 and 5109-5110 in 1899.

This quartet of Eight-wheelers were a slight enlargement of the C-1/C-1As delivered to the Rutland earlier in the decade (Locobase 14538). In addition to the 23-tube increase in heating surface, the engine's boiler pressure was set 30 psi (2.06 bar) higher. Otherwise, the two classes were identical.


Class C-2 (Locobase 14540)

Data from Dimensions and Classifications of Locomotives of the NYC&HR et al, September 1905, p. 321-322. (Many thanks to Chris Hohl for his 18 February 2015 email and spreadsheet noting all of the road number changes for this class.) Works numbers were 2772, 2774 in 1897.

Delivered to the Rutland in the same years as the first of Schenectady C-1Bs, this pair of Dunkirk, NY locomotives offers an intriguing side-by-side look. The Schenectadies repeated a design from 1891, while this pair clearly looked ahead.

For example, instead of nestling horizontally between the driving axles, the grate now sloped down back to front above the axles. As a result, the firebox was about seven inches (179 mm) wider, but most of the grate area's 67% increase derived from a 31 inch (787 mm) increase in length. Tube count increased by one, but tube length decreased 5 inches (127 mm). Cylinder volume grew with the two-inch (51 mm) longer stroke.

Adhesion weight grew by 7 1/4 tons (6,577 kg) and overall engine weight by 8 1/4 tons (7,484 kg). Driving and engine wheelbases shrank by six inches (152 mm), while the larger, heavier tender added almost six feet to the overall wheelbase.

One of the two locomotives was later superheated; see Locobase 14567.


Class C-2 - superheated (Locobase 14567)

Data from 1925 Rutland Locomotive Diagram book digitized at Middlebury College in Vermont and made available on the Web at http://middarchive.middlebury.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/vtbookspamp/id/19372/rec/10, p. 11. (Many thanks to Chris Hohl for his 18 February 2015 email and spreadsheet noting all of the road number changes for this class.)

Locobase 14540 describes the two medium-sized 4-4-0s that came on the Rutland in 1897. Sometime later, but before 1925 when the diagram was prepared, the railroad superheated one of the pair. Like many modified locomotives, very little outside of the boiler was change. In the boiler, 21 flues replaced almost half (134) of the tubes. The consequent superheater gain was not dramatic, but most likely had a good effect on the the engine's power.


Class C-25 (Locobase 14541)

Data from Dimensions and Classifications of Locomotives of the NYC&HR et al, September 1905, p. 323-324. Works numbers were 1918-1919 in 1886.


Class C-X (Locobase 14545)

Data from Dimensions and Classifications of Locomotives of the NYC&HR et al, September 1905, p. 325.

In the 1905 guide, the New York Central assigned the same class ID to several locomotives of different, but relatively ancient, origins. Each variant was different enough that Locobase breaks them out into a series of entries (14544-14546). This engine was built in the O&SL's shops and was the smallest of the C-X agglomeration.


Class Ne-ha-sa-ne (Locobase 11153)

Data from Schenectady Locomotive Works, Illustrated Catalogue of Simple and Compound Locomotives (Philadelphia: J B Lippincott, 1897), pp. 198-199. See also Jim Shaughnessey, The Rutland Road (2d Edition) (Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 1997), pp. 102-106. (Thanks to Chris Hohl for his 18 February 2015 email noting some detail differences and all the road number changes for this unusual engine.) Works number was 4410 in 1896.

This was the inspection engine for Dr William Seward Webb, who then owned the St&A and had an estate so named in the Adirondacks. The design featured the usual very long cab that extended from footplate to smokebox. Jim Shaugnessey says she was "a thing of beauty from her polished rims to the top of the solid mahogany observation cab". Stairways on either side of the smokebox curled up to doors that let into narrow walkways and three plush chairs on either side of the boiler. A white-coated steward served Dr Webb and his guests as they "inspected" the line.

Shaughnessey reports that the Ne-ha-sa-ne carried Dr Webb into Vermont to assume the presidency of the Rutland and served him for several years. (Webb established a second estate at Shelburne, south of Burlington on the Rutland, that would eventually be opened to the public many years later as a wide-ranging museum.)

Chris Hohl recounts the parade of road numbers assigned to this engine after its original #10: "Ne-Ha-Sa-Ne was later sold to the NYC&HR as #49, then the Rutland as #100, then to the NYC Lines as #33, and then back to the Rutland as #99 (Class C)."

Alas, says Shaughnessey, the good times ended. "Finally, like an aged and discarded mistress, she was relegated to a lonesome twilight life, shuffling in dingy disregard around the back tracks of Rutland." (p. 106).


Class Shelburne / C-X (Locobase 14549)

Data from Dimensions and Classifications of Locomotives of the NYC&HR et al, September 1905, p. 328. Works numbers were 464, 466 in 1868.

In the 1905 guide, the New York Central assigned the same class ID to several locomotives of different, but relatively ancient, origins. Each variant was different enough that Locobase breaks them out into a series of entries (14544-14549).

This pair was delivered to the CV, but were soon transferred to the Rutland when the CV leased the Rutland's lines. They were later renumbered in the CV's series as 226 (works 466) and 227 (works 464). Only the 226 remained on the Rutland when the New York Central bought a controlling interest in 1904.

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassC-1/C-1AC-1BC-2C-2 - superheatedC-25
Locobase ID14538 14539 14540 14567 14541
RailroadRutland (Rutland)Rutland (Rutland)Rutland (Rutland)Rutland (Rutland)Rutland (Rutland)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class44212
Road Numbers14-15, 232-233/862-865/82-84/67236-237, 241-242/184-187/866-869249-250/190-91/1000-01/65-6680-81/65-66793-794
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built4422
BuilderSchenectadySchenectadyBrooksRutlandSchenectady
Year1891189718971886
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase9'9' 8.50' 8.50' 8.50'
Engine Wheelbase23.92'23.92'23.58'23.58'22.92'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.38 0.38 0.36 0.36 0.37
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)46.75'46.77'52.25'52.25'44.24'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers70000 lbs70000 lbs84500 lbs86000 lbs60000 lbs
Engine Weight106600 lbs110000 lbs126500 lbs126500 lbs84500 lbs
Tender Light Weight86000 lbs90000 lbs118000 lbs118000 lbs64000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight192600 lbs200000 lbs244500 lbs244500 lbs148500 lbs
Tender Water Capacity3600 gals4000 gals5900 gals5900 gals2600 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)8 tons8 tons9 tons9 tons7 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)58 lb/yard58 lb/yard70 lb/yard72 lb/yard50 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter69"69"68"69"64"
Boiler Pressure160 psi190 psi200 psi190 psi140 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)18" x 24"18" x 24"18" x 26"19" x 26"17" x 24"
Tractive Effort15327 lbs18200 lbs21060 lbs21969 lbs12897 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.57 3.85 4.01 3.91 4.65
Heating Ability
Firebox Area157 sq. ft161 sq. ft173 sq. ft173 sq. ft122 sq. ft
Grate Area18.19 sq. ft17.92 sq. ft30.55 sq. ft30.55 sq. ft17.14 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1728 sq. ft1876 sq. ft1835 sq. ft1358 sq. ft1353 sq. ft
Superheating Surface255 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface1728 sq. ft1876 sq. ft1835 sq. ft1613 sq. ft1353 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume244.46265.40239.63159.16214.59
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation29103405611058052400
Same as above plus superheater percentage29103405611067332400
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area2512030590346003812917080
Power L1654282877992115704649
Power MT412.07521.99417.03593.20341.64

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassC-XNe-ha-sa-neShelburne / C-X
Locobase ID14545 11153 14549
RailroadOgdensburgh & St Lawrence (Rutland)St Lawrence & Adirondack (Rutland)Central Vermont (Rutland)
CountryUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class112
Road Numbers3-27/76/105910/49/10/33/9937-38 / 1064
GaugeStdStdStd
Number Built112
BuilderO&SLSchenectadyTaunton
Year187218961868
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase8' 7.33' 7.50'
Engine Wheelbase22.19'20.83'21'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.36 0.35 0.36
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)41.67'41.08'41'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers38000 lbs49700 lbs42100 lbs
Engine Weight66200 lbs78700 lbs68100 lbs
Tender Light Weight47600 lbs70000 lbs58200 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight113800 lbs148700 lbs126300 lbs
Tender Water Capacity1800 gals2500 gals3000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)5 tons7 tons7 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)32 lb/yard41 lb/yard35 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter64"62"64"
Boiler Pressure130 psi180 psi140 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)16" x 24"14" x 22"16" x 24"
Tractive Effort10608 lbs10641 lbs11424 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.58 4.67 3.69
Heating Ability
Firebox Area96 sq. ft80 sq. ft97 sq. ft
Grate Area15 sq. ft13.89 sq. ft14.58 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1004 sq. ft784 sq. ft958 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface1004 sq. ft784 sq. ft958 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume179.77200.01171.53
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation195025002041
Same as above plus superheater percentage195025002041
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area124801440013580
Power L1368556183858
Power MT427.58498.41404.06

Reference


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