Carolina Central / Charlotte Harbor & Northern / East & West / Florida & West Indian Short Line / Florida Central & Peninsular / Georgia & Alabama / Georgia Carolina & Northern / Georgia Florida & Alabama / Palmetto / Raleigh & Gaston / Richmond & Gaston / Savannah, Americus & Montgomery / Seaboard Air Line / South Carolina Western Extension 4-4-0 "American" Locomotives of the USA


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class 100 (Locobase 4979)

Data from 1929 SAL locomotive diagrams published on http://www.dnaco.net/~gelwood/other/sal--steambk.html . NB: Heating surface area is tubes only.

Middleweight turn-of-the-century American delivered to the GF & A, which was nicknamed the Sumatra Leaf Line, which commemorated the type of tobacco grown in the area. Less formally, it was also picturesquely described as the Gophers, Frogs & Alligators. Its main line connected Cuthbert, Georgia with Tallahassee, Florida.

The Seaboard Air Line gave the engine #100 when it gained control of the GF & A in 1928.


Class 102 (Locobase 4977)

Data from 1929 SAL locomotive diagrams published on http://www.dnaco.net/~gelwood/other/sal--steambk.html . Branch-line American absorbed by the Seaboard Air Line when it acquired the GF&A. Still in service in 1929.


Class 104 (Locobase 9346)

Data from GF&A 5 - 1921 and SAL 1929 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works number was 26198 in August 1905.

A single wood-burning engine supplied by Baldwin with a cabbage stack to roam about the piney branch lines of the GF & A. The total under fuel represents cords of wood.

Baldwin classified the locomotive by their system as 8-30-C-621. On the 1929 SAL diagram, the firebox heating surface area is not given, but the listing shows 11.7 sq ft of arch tubes. By this time the firebox had been converted to coal-burning and the tender held 12 tons of coal.


Class 2 (Locobase 9375)

Data from SAL 9 - 1918 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See Locobase 9351 for a description for the elegant diagrams that held the data for these locomotives.

Produced two in August 1889 (works #2287-2288) and November 1889 (2434-2435), these locomotives were bought by the E & W at the time when it converted from 3 ft to standard gauge. In 1902, Seaboard Air Line bought the E & W, renaming it Atlanta and Birmingham Air Line Railway in 1903. The A & BAL was fully merged with the SAL a few years later.


Class 3/B-7 (Locobase 16070)

Data from SAL 1907 locomotive diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See Locobase 9351 for a description for the elegant diagrams that held the data for These locomotives.

Just before the CC took delivery of the pair of light Eight-wheelers from Baldwin shown in Locobase 16054, it built this stablemate in its own shops. Differences in dimensions between home-spun and Philadelphia-made were minor, although Locobase cannot vouch for the materials.

After the CCRwy merged with the Seaboard Air Line, the 3 was renumbered 420 and placed in its own subclass.


Class 300/B-4 (Locobase 15948)

Data from CofGa 1905 and CofGa 11 - 1927 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 13, p. 65. Works number was 8004 in May 1886.

This Eight-wheeler was originally part of a six-locomotive order agreed to by Covington & Macon and Baldwin in 1885 (Locobase 7924). Ultimately, the C&M would take delivery of three of the six, but road number 3, to be named Jasper County, was sold before delivery to the Palmetto.

The Palmetto, which opened in June 1887 with 5 miles of road and this engine, would swell to 18.7 miles by September. At that point, it became a subsidiary of the Raleigh & Augusta, itself owned by the Raleigh & Gaston. By agreement, the PRwy operated independently for several years before being merged with the Seaboard Air Line.

The SAL scrapped the 300 in September 1908


Class 31 (2nd)/421 (Locobase 16054)

Data from SAL 9 - 1918 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 14, p. 240. See Locobase 9351 for a description for the elegant diagrams that held the data for these locomotives. Works numbers were 9716-9717 in January 1889 and 10456-10457 in November.

When the two Eight-wheelers described in Locobase 9356 were sold by the CC to the Raleigh & Gaston in 1888, their old numbers were assumed by this smaller pair of branch-line locomotives.

They later wore Seaboard Air Line 421-422. 422 was sold to the Aberdeen & Asheboro in June 1902 as their 32. 33-34 belonged to the November pair and were renumbered 423-424 when they were taken into the SAL in 1900. 424 was destroyed in a December 1905 wreck and 423, after renumberings as 506 and 127, was sold for scrap to W Z Williams in October 1917.


Class 7/Odd (Locobase 14066)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 45, p. 154. See also SAL 1929 Locomotive Diagrams 2 supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works number was 41074 in January 1914.

The SCWE was one of several railroads in South Carolina that amalgamated under the Seaboard Air Lines banner. But first the SCWE was taken over by the Carolina Atlantic & Western in April 1914, shortly after the 7 was delivered. The Eight-wheeler had wide-set drivers and inside radial valve gear.

The specs required Eddystone to "give particular attention to the clause in the specification reading 'Details as far as practicable to be interchangeable with engines 5 and 6, class 10 D 30 633-36636, built for the South Carolina Western Ry." Given that those locomotives, the last two of a set of six Ten-wheelers with longer boilers, and longer-stroke cylinders (Locobase 13699), most of the duplication may have come in the special equipment.

The CA&W renumbered the 7 as 12. A year and half later in November 1915, the CA&W came under the SAL and the 12 was placed in class O odd and renumbered 166. By that time, boiler pressure was reset to 180 psi, which raised tractive effort to 19,260 lb (8,736 kg or 85.67 kN).

166 ran on the SAL until December 1936.


Class 8 (Locobase 4974)

Data from 1929 SAL locomotive diagrams published on http://www.dnaco.net/~gelwood/other/sal--steambk.html . See also DeGolyer, Volume 43, pp. 158+, and Donald R Hensley, Jr, "Charlotte Harbor & Northern Railway: The Boca Grande Route" Part II, archived on http://www.taplines.net/0307/chn02.html . (Thanks to Chris Hohl for his 1 May 2016 email noting the original fuel, tender weights, boiler pressure setting, and estimated locomotive weights.) Works number was 39059 in January 1913.

The CH&N ran northeast from Boca Grande, a barrier island on the Gulf Coast guarding Charlotte Harbor, up to Arcadia, where it intersected the Atlantic Coast Line, then due north to Pebble, just southeast of Tampa.

Hensley comments in particular that in addition to its phosphate and timber traffic, the Boca Grande Route was well patronized by passengers. The CH&N "built up Boca Grande by building homes, a hotel and a golf course. A new magnificent railroad depot was built for the tourist to debark at Boca Grande and there was a stop at the Gasparilla fish camp on the north end."

Chris Hohl notes that this late-in-the-day American-type was delivered with a boiler set to 170 psi (11.7 bar) and trailing a heavily loaded tender weighing 108,000 lb (48,988 kg) when loaded with 10 tons (9.1 tonnes) of coal. Baldwin had estimated the 8's adhesion weight at 66,000 lb (29,937 kg) and its engine weight as 104,500 lb (47,400 kg)

After it arrived, the 8 served as the railroad's main passenger power. Its booked time from South Boca Grande to Mulberry 97 miles distant was 4 hours and 12 minutes (23 mph/37 km/h), which during the period of the CH&N's independent existence was easily competitive with any rival service.

Hensley notes further: "The Tampa-Boca Grande train was popular even after the automobile starting eroding passenger traffic. After the SAL takeover the train continued to run until the late 1950's."

The 8 taken into the Seaboard Air Line as 103 when the CH&N was absorbed by the SAL in 1928.

It was withdrawn in 1933 and sold to the Dowling & Camp Lumber Company.


Class E1 (Locobase 4998)

Small-grate and relatively lightweight Americans used, presumably, on branch lines.

Data from 1929 SAL locomotive diagrams published on http://www.dnaco.net/~gelwood/other/sal--steambk.html .


Class E16-B3/B-4 (Locobase 9351)

Data from SAL 9 - 1918 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 11, p. 242 and Volume 12, p. 214. Works numbers 7120-7121 in January 1884, 7386 in July, 7695-7696 in October 1895.

One of the most striking features of this diagram book is the quality of the diagram - it has an etched look as if it were illustrating a book published 75 years before. The copperplate lettering of the diagram and the printed script of the measurement descriptions lend their own grace to this utilitarian document.

In this instance, the diagram shows small Eight-wheelers that were supplied over a four-year period from January 1884 to 1888. By the time of the 1918 book, the 25 had been sold to the Ocala & Northern (in 1910) and all the others but 24, now renumbered 217, had been scrapped. 217 was retired in March 1919.

Unusually for an antebellum Southern railroad, the R & G was completed to the standard gauge. The R & G moved in and out of bankruptcy in the 1840s and was a major CSA line from Raleigh to Richmond during the Civil War. In November 1899, the New York Times, an upcoming company meeting had as its purpose "....considering a change of its corporate title of "The Raleigh & Gaston Railroad Company" to "Sea-any other name that may be selected and Board Railroad Company" or agreed upon."


Class E16-B7 (Locobase 9352)

Data from SAL 9 - 1918 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See Locobase 9351 for a description for the elegant diagrams that held the data for these locomotives.

This engine was taken into the Seaboard in 1899 and renumbered in 1911.


Class E16-B8 (Locobase 9353)

Data from SAL 9 - 1918 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 15, p. 204. See Locobase 9351 for a description for the elegant diagrams that held the data for These locomotives. Works numbers were 10456 -10457, 10462 in November 1889

The 3 accompanied a pair of identical engines headed for the Carolina Central (Locobase 16054) . The trio differed from another pack of Eight-wheelers delivered to the same railroads in having smaller cylinders and weighing considerably less.

The 502 was retired in 1919 and scrapped in 1924.


Class E17-D1 (Locobase 9355)

Data from SAL 9 - 1918 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See Locobase 9351 for a description for the elegant diagrams that held the data for these locomotives.

Produced singly in September 1889 (works #2282 and 2254) for the SAL, these two mixed-traffic Eight-wheelers had the typical dimensions and power for the time.


Class E40-E (Locobase 9356)

Data from SAL 9 - 1918 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See Locobase 9351 for a description for the elegant diagrams that held the data for these locomotives. See also DeGolyer, Volume 14, p. 12. Works numbers were 8769 and 8871 in September 1887.

These soon came under the Raleigh & Gaston and changed their road numbers from 31-32 to 223-224.


Class E45-E3 (Locobase 9358)

Data from SAL 9 - 1918 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 15, p. 155. See Locobase 9351 for a description for the elegant diagrams that held the data for these locomotives. Works numbers were 10179 in August 1889; 10910, 10926 in May 1890; 11264 in October.

This railroad was the mainline of what would soon be called the Georgia & Alabama and it purchased these Eight-wheelers for local passenger work. They were all named as follows: John Cobb, B. P. Hollis, J. E. D. Shipp, Dupont Guerry.

When the G & A was folded into the Seaboard Air Line, these engines were respectively renumbered 148-151.


Class E45-E4 (Locobase 5000)

Data from SAL 9 - 1918 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See Locobase 9351 for a description for the elegant diagrams that held the data for these locomotives. (See also 1929 SAL locomotive diagrams published on http://www.dnaco.net/~gelwood/other/sal--steambk.html.)

Richmond's order for this trio was filled in a block (works #2578-2580). A little bigger than earlier Georgia Ten-wheelers, these engines were of a piece with the earlier designs. They had the narrow firebox dropped between the axles, although the driving wheelbase was a bit longer and the boiler a bit higher pitched.

They were all taken into the Seaboard Air Line as their 125-127 in 1901.

After the Savannah, Americus (Ga) & Montgomery Railway failed, a successor known as the Georgia & Alabama was formed in 1895. Known as the "Savannah Short Line" because of its direct connection between Montgomery and Savannah, the G & A quickly took over the Abbeville & Waycross and the Columbus Southern. (It also passed through Plains, Ga, the home town of President Jimmy Carter.)

Only 5 years later, the Seaboard Air Line bought the G & A.


Class E50-G3 (Locobase 4996)

Data from 1929 SAL locomotive diagrams published on http://www.dnaco.net/~gelwood/other/sal--steambk.html and SAL 9 - 1918 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See Locobase 9351 for a description for the elegant diagrams that held the data for these locomotives.

A comparison between this class (works #4930-4931, 4963-4965) and the I-10 (Locobase 4995) suggests that the latter is a Ten-wheeler version of this engine. This American-type engine seems intended for passenger service on the main line.


Class E55-G (Locobase 4983)

Data from 1929 SAL locomotive diagrams published on http://www.dnaco.net/~gelwood/other/sal--steambk.html . See also "Seaboard Air-Line Passenger Engine," Railroad & Locomotive Engineering, Volume 8, Number 9 (September 1895), p. 553.

B Rumary's summary of Richmond production, supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004, showed 2459-2465.

American type designed, said the R & LE report, by the SAL's superintendent of motive power W T Reed "...for handling heavy, fast passenger trains." The account described the design as "remarkably well-proportioned." Given its intended service, that's an odd assessment of a locomotive with such a high heating surface to grate ratio and relatively low firebox-to-heating surface ratio.

At the time of later renumbering, two of the 7 had already left the SAL.


Class E6 (Locobase 4993)

Data from 1929 SAL locomotive diagrams published on http://www.dnaco.net/~gelwood/other/sal--steambk.html . According to a compilation of Cooke locomotives by B.Rumary (25 Kingscombe, Gurney Slade, Radstock, BA3 4TH, ENGLAND) and supplied to Locobase by Allen Stanley in March 2004, works numbers were 2415-2416 (December 1898).

Among the last of the small-grate Americans used, presumably, on branch lines. Note the relatively low axle loading. Continuing the line of passenger locomotives supplied to the FC & P, this duo (works #2415-2416) produced in December 1898 had an unusually long stroke for an Eight-wheeler. Angus Sinclair, writing in Railway and Locomotive Engineering, March 1899, p.131, told readers that he had been curious about the long stroke and wrote to Mr T A Phillips, the F, C & P's assistant general manager about how they were performing.

Quite well, said Phillips. Why? The railroad decided to decrease cylinder diameter and lengthen stroke about 4 years earlier, and "...results attained have been far beyond our expectations." He explained that lengthening stroke by 2" to 26" in earlier designs had shown reduced coal consumption and better power, then commented: "The last two engines we had built by Cooke; had them 18 x 28 inches, and so far they have showed about the same percentage of improvement over the 18x 26-inch ...and they have proven entirely satisfactory to us in every respect. As the fundamental principle of power is leverage, we find these engines with the long stroke give us better satisfaction than any other, as we get more leverage from them, consequently more power and better results in every way."

Pulling the vestibuled New York and Florida trains over the heaviest grades (60-80 ft per mile and tight curves, the engines were able to average 40 mph with 7 vestibuled Pullmans. On a part of the road with light grades, the same engines ran 80 miles and made five stops (for railroad crossings and drawbridges) in 2:10 pulling 14-car trains, of which 5 cars were sleepers.

The long stroke wasn't the only source of such improved results, he thought it "perhaps fair to say." In addition, "...the outside and inside lap and size of ports [in the slide valves] have a great deal to do with their satisfactory performance."

A Georgia railroad history site -- http://www.railga.com/flcenpen.html (visited 11 August 2004)-- tells us that the FC & P was created out of the bankrupt remains of the Florida Railway & Navigation in 1889. The FC & P ultimately ran a railroad through from Jacksonville to Columbia, SC and in a rather dense network in Central Florida. It was bought by the Seaboard Air Line in 1899 and formally merged with the SAL in 1903.


Class E60-E5 (Locobase 9359)

Data from SAL 9 - 1918 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See Locobase 9351 for a description for the elegant diagrams that held the data for these locomotives.

Rogers works numbers for this quartet included 5065 (October 1895) and 5101, 5156-5157 (December 1895). The figure given for total heating surface in the 1918 book seemed awfully small at . The 1907 book supplies the value (1,404 sq ft) used in the specs.

The FC & P's layout resembled the state it primarily served in skeleton. The original line -- Tallahassee Railroad -- went from that city to St Marks and opened in 1837. Several amalgamations and name changes later, the FC & P on the eve of its merger with the Seaboard Air Line in 1903 had a Western Division -- Jacksonville to Chattahoochee -- and a Southern Division -- Fernandina (on the Atlantic Coast north of Jacksonville) to Cedar Key (across the peninsula from Daytona).


Class E60-G1 (Locobase 4981)

Small class of Americans delivered at the same time as the Baldwin G2. These had slightly larger grates, but they still seem awfully small for the boiler.

Data from 1929 SAL locomotive diagrams published on http://www.dnaco.net/~gelwood/other/sal--steambk.html .


Class E60-G2/G2 (Locobase 4980)

Data from 1929 SAL locomotive diagrams published on http://www.dnaco.net/~gelwood/other/sal--steambk.html . See also DeGolyer, Volume 23, p. 61. Works numbers were 18020-18021, 18059, 18065 in August 1900 and 18132-18133, 18161, 18171-18174 in September.

Relatively high-drivered class of Americans with small grates and narrower than usual fireboxes. Described as "sleek but chunky". The Seaboard's diagrams showed a firebox with 162 sq ft (15.05 sq m) of heating surfaces and a total of 1,878 sq ft (174.47 sa m) of evaporative heating surface arrea..Leading truck wheel diameters were reduced from 33" (838 mm) to 30" (762 mm).

They operated until the last retired in 1933.


Class T55-E2 (Locobase 9357)

Data from SAL 9 - 1918 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See Locobase 9351 for a description for the elegant diagrams that held the data for these locomotives.

Richmond (works #2309, 2324-2325, 2371-2373) and Rhode Island (works #2283, 2296-2298) contributed engines to this class of freight Ten-wheelers. Road #105 was later assigned to switcher service and had its boiler pressure reduced to 135 psi.

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class10010210423/B-7
Locobase ID4979 4977 9346 9375 16070
RailroadGeorgia Florida & Alabama (SAL)Georgia Florida & Alabama (SAL)Georgia Florida & Alabama (SAL)East & West (SAL)Carolina Central (SAL)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class11141
Road Numbers100102104 / 1012-4, 6 / 250-2533/420/505
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built11141
BuilderPittsburghRhode IslandBurnham, Williams & CoRhode IslandCC
Year18961897190518891888
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase 9.09' 8.59' 9.08' 8.58'8'
Engine Wheelbase23.50'22.50'23.92'22.66'22.37'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.39 0.38 0.38 0.38 0.36
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)47'46.50'46.50'50'44.37'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)37000 lbs30000 lbs35810 lbs
Weight on Drivers74000 lbs60000 lbs68910 lbs59400 lbs54250 lbs
Engine Weight104000 lbs92000 lbs108660 lbs93200 lbs86000 lbs
Tender Light Weight81000 lbs80000 lbs67400 lbs49150 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight173000 lbs188660 lbs160600 lbs135150 lbs
Tender Water Capacity4500 gals4500 gals4000 gals3000 gals3200 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)10 tons8 tons3 tons tons tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)62 lb/yard50 lb/yard57 lb/yard50 lb/yard45 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter68"59"62"60"63"
Boiler Pressure160 psi150 psi180 psi150 psi140 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)18" x 24"18" x 24"18" x 24"17" x 24"16" x 24"
Tractive Effort15552 lbs16804 lbs19189 lbs14739 lbs11605 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.76 3.57 3.59 4.03 4.67
Heating Ability
Firebox Area143.02 sq. ft147 sq. ft136 sq. ft99.73 sq. ft
Grate Area17.70 sq. ft15.75 sq. ft18.60 sq. ft17 sq. ft15.20 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1279 sq. ft1169 sq. ft1639 sq. ft1304 sq. ft1177 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface1279 sq. ft1169 sq. ft1639 sq. ft1304 sq. ft1177 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume180.94165.38231.87206.82210.74
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation28322363334825502128
Same as above plus superheater percentage28322363334825502128
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area021453264602040013962
Power L103932624747204410
Power MT0288.95399.72350.36358.43

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class300/B-431 (2nd)/4217/Odd8E1
Locobase ID15948 16054 14066 4974 4998
RailroadPalmetto (SAL)Carolina Central (SAL)South Carolina Western Extension (SAL)Charlotte Harbor & Northern (SAL)Seaboard Air Line (SAL)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class1211
Road Numbers30031-34/421-4247/1668/103144
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built1211
BuilderBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoBaldwinBaldwinRichmond
Year18861889191419131892
Valve GearStephensonStephensonWalschaertWalschaertStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase8'8' 9.08' 8.75' 8.75'
Engine Wheelbase21.75'21.75'24.29'22.83'22.75'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.37 0.37 0.37 0.38 0.38
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)43.21'49.87'52'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)31950 lbs31750 lbs
Weight on Drivers46000 lbs50350 lbs74000 lbs63900 lbs63500 lbs
Engine Weight72000 lbs80250 lbs117000 lbs105500 lbs98000 lbs
Tender Light Weight61300 lbs52350 lbs90000 lbs115000 lbs98000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight133300 lbs132600 lbs207000 lbs220500 lbs196000 lbs
Tender Water Capacity2800 gals2200 gals4500 gals6000 gals3000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)8 tons tons8 tons3075 gals gals
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)38 lb/yard42 lb/yard62 lb/yard53 lb/yard53 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter63"61"62"66"63"
Boiler Pressure135 psi140 psi180 psi175 psi150 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)16" x 24"16" x 24"18" x 24"18" x 24"18" x 24"
Tractive Effort11191 lbs11986 lbs19189 lbs17525 lbs15737 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.11 4.20 3.86 3.65 4.04
Heating Ability
Firebox Area103 sq. ft103.73 sq. ft134 sq. ft136 sq. ft146.10 sq. ft
Grate Area15.20 sq. ft15 sq. ft18.20 sq. ft17.60 sq. ft17.77 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1133 sq. ft1170 sq. ft1672 sq. ft1456 sq. ft1479 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface1133 sq. ft1170 sq. ft1672 sq. ft1456 sq. ft1479 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume202.86209.49236.54205.98209.24
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation20522100327630802666
Same as above plus superheater percentage20522100327630802666
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area1390514522241202380021915
Power L141834303616358174923
Power MT400.95376.82367.22401.39341.84

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassE16-B3/B-4E16-B7E16-B8E17-D1E40-E
Locobase ID9351 9352 9353 9355 9356
RailroadRaleigh & Gaston (SAL)Carolina Central (SAL)Georgia Carolina & Northern (SAL)Seaboard Air Line (SAL)Carolina Central (SAL)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class61122
Road Numbers24-25, 27-29/216, 217, 219-221 /125420 / 5053/502106, 10831-32 (1st)
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built51122
BuilderBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoCCBurnham, Williams & CoRhode IslandBurnham, Parry, Williams & Co
Year18841888188918891887
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase8'8'8' 8.67' 8.75'
Engine Wheelbase21.76'22.37'21.17'23.17'22.75'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.37 0.36 0.38 0.37 0.38
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)42.69'44.29'43.21'46.75'46.08'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)25475 lbs
Weight on Drivers45000 lbs54250 lbs50350 lbs62400 lbs62000 lbs
Engine Weight72500 lbs86000 lbs80350 lbs94800 lbs98000 lbs
Tender Light Weight53000 lbs99150 lbs52325 lbs73000 lbs64600 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight125500 lbs185150 lbs132675 lbs167800 lbs162600 lbs
Tender Water Capacity2900 gals3200 gals2300 gals3000 gals3600 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)38 lb/yard45 lb/yard42 lb/yard52 lb/yard52 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter59"63"62"63"63"
Boiler Pressure130 psi140 psi120 psi140 psi140 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)16" x 24"16" x 24"16" x 24"17" x 24"18" x 24"
Tractive Effort11507 lbs11605 lbs10108 lbs13101 lbs14688 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.91 4.67 4.98 4.76 4.22
Heating Ability
Firebox Area106.35 sq. ft99.73 sq. ft103.73 sq. ft135 sq. ft146.25 sq. ft
Grate Area15.57 sq. ft15.20 sq. ft15.50 sq. ft17.40 sq. ft17.70 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface920 sq. ft1149 sq. ft1166 sq. ft1262 sq. ft1601 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface920 sq. ft1149 sq. ft1166 sq. ft1262 sq. ft1601 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume164.73205.73208.77200.16226.50
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation20242128186024362478
Same as above plus superheater percentage20242128186024362478
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area1382613962124481890020475
Power L133234337374045164850
Power MT325.60352.50327.52319.10344.92

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassE45-E3E45-E4E50-G3E55-GE6
Locobase ID9358 5000 4996 4983 4993
RailroadSavannah, Americus & Montgomery (SAL)Georgia & Alabama (SAL)Florida Central & Peninsular (SAL)Seaboard Air Line (SAL)Florida Central & Peninsular (SAL)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class43572
Road Numbers107, 116-121/148-151,125-12760-64 / 341-345540-546 / 170-179159-160+
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built4357
BuilderBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoRichmondRogersRichmondCooke
Year18891896189418951898
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase 8.54' 9.17' 9.09' 9.17' 9.09'
Engine Wheelbase25.29'23.25'23.27'23.92'23.79'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.34 0.39 0.39 0.38 0.38
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)48.69'45.50'47.26'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)33700 lbs37000 lbs38350 lbs37450 lbs
Weight on Drivers62000 lbs67400 lbs74000 lbs76700 lbs74900 lbs
Engine Weight96000 lbs108650 lbs118000 lbs118500 lbs122800 lbs
Tender Light Weight70250 lbs85400 lbs74000 lbs80800 lbs95800 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight166250 lbs194050 lbs192000 lbs199300 lbs218600 lbs
Tender Water Capacity3000 gals4000 gals4000 gals4200 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)52 lb/yard56 lb/yard62 lb/yard64 lb/yard62 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter63"63"69"69"69"
Boiler Pressure155 psi160 psi165 psi175 psi185 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)18" x 24"18" x 24"19" x 24"19" x 24"18" x 28"
Tractive Effort16262 lbs16786 lbs17611 lbs18678 lbs20675 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.81 4.02 4.20 4.11 3.62
Heating Ability
Firebox Area138 sq. ft148.52 sq. ft140 sq. ft151.73 sq. ft142.40 sq. ft
Grate Area17.12 sq. ft18.50 sq. ft17.52 sq. ft17.80 sq. ft17.65 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1460 sq. ft1518 sq. ft1583 sq. ft1728 sq. ft1648 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface1460 sq. ft1518 sq. ft1583 sq. ft1728 sq. ft1648 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume206.55214.75201.00219.41199.84
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation26542960289131153265
Same as above plus superheater percentage26542960289131153265
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area2139023763231002655326344
Power L149505373550063546088
Power MT352.03351.50327.71365.27358.39

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassE60-E5E60-G1E60-G2/G2T55-E2
Locobase ID9359 4981 4980 9357
RailroadFlorida Central & Peninsular (SAL)Seaboard Air Line (SAL)Florida & West Indian Short Line (SAL)Richmond & Gaston (SAL)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class441510
Road Numbers69-72 / 350-353180-184606-620/185-199105, 109-115, 131-134-5
GaugeStdStdStdStd
Number Built441510
BuilderRogersRhode IslandBurnham, Williams & Coseveral
Year1895190019001889
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase 9.08' 9.17' 9.17'13.33'
Engine Wheelbase23.92'24.59'24.58'24.81'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.38 0.37 0.37 0.54
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)50.42'47.62'48.02'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)40150 lbs39400 lbs
Weight on Drivers72400 lbs80300 lbs78800 lbs82000 lbs
Engine Weight115700 lbs133100 lbs118200 lbs108200 lbs
Tender Light Weight74000 lbs80100 lbs80200 lbs62450 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight189700 lbs213200 lbs198400 lbs170650 lbs
Tender Water Capacity4200 gals4000 gals4000 gals3000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)60 lb/yard67 lb/yard66 lb/yard68 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter69"72"72"55"
Boiler Pressure185 psi190 psi190 psi140 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)18" x 26"19" x 26"19" x 26"18" x 24"
Tractive Effort19198 lbs21053 lbs21053 lbs16824 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.77 3.81 3.74 4.87
Heating Ability
Firebox Area149.50 sq. ft162 sq. ft151.80 sq. ft145 sq. ft
Grate Area19.90 sq. ft18.04 sq. ft17.50 sq. ft19.19 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1404 sq. ft1860 sq. ft1866 sq. ft1477 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface1404 sq. ft1860 sq. ft1866 sq. ft1477 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume183.35218.00218.70208.95
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation3682342833252687
Same as above plus superheater percentage3682342833252687
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area27658307802884220300
Power L15977713570153998
Power MT364.01391.78392.52214.98

Reference


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