Alamagordo & Sacramento Mountain / Arizona & New Mexico / Central Pacific / Galveston, Harrisburg & San Antonio / Houston & Texas Central / North Pacific Coast / Northwestern Pacific / San Antonio & Aransas Pass / San Francisco & North Pacific / South Pacific Coast / Southern Pacific / Texas & New Orleans 4-4-0 "American" Locomotives of the USA


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class 1 (Locobase 7237)

Data from the SA&AP 6 - 1917 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 12, p. 179. Works numbers were 7626 and 7628.

(See Locobase 7235 for a description of this SouthEast Texas railroad.)

This pair of Baldwins were the first SA&AP engines, if their original road numbers are any guide. Their names - San Antonio (1) and Aransas Pass (2) -- confirm their primacy on the motive power roster. They had Radley & Hunter diamond stacks to handle the wood they burned. As ordered, the pair put 46,000 lb (20,865 kg) on the drivers and 70,000 lb (31,752 kg). Later, they were converted to oil-burning, as shown in the specs.

They stayed with the railroad until the mid-teens.


Class 10/E-51 (Locobase 8758)

SP Menke All-Time Steam Loco Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Vol 10a, p. 6. Works number was 7605 in May 1885.

The original specs for this pair of skinny-gauge Eight-wheelers called for 160 1 3/4" tubes and a firebox that measured only 21 5/8" wide (549 mm). The width was not unusual for the three-foot gauge, but Locobase marvels at the Lilliputian dimension.

At some point during their careers, the 9 and 10 were substantially rebuilt with taller drivers, a new boiler holder fewer, larger-diameter tubes, a larger firebox, all of which was spread out on a longer wheelbase.


Class 1228 (Locobase 12998)

Data from Roy E Appleman, "Union Pacific Locomotive #119 and Central Pacific Locomotive #60, Jupiter, at Promontory Point, Utah, May 10, 1869 (typescript, Washington, DC: Washington Office, National Park Service, US Department of the Interior, July 1966), pp. 66-67 and , Appendix F as archived on http://cprr.org/Museum/Books/I_ACCEPT_the_User_Agreement/Jupiter-119_Appleman_NPS.pdf, last accessed 9 August 2011. See also the Kloke Locomotive Works description and photos at http://www.leviathan63.com/leviathan63.html . As part of his investigation into the feasibility of building replicas of the two locomotives whose pilots touched at completion of the first Transcontinental railroad, Appleman notes the diagram reproduced in the report asAppendix F. He notes that 1228 was the renumbered #161, which was built to the same design as that of the Jupiter by Schenectady in 1869. The drivers were now taller (possibly because the tires were thicker), the stack no longer blossomed into the broad funnel-like, spark-arresting shape, and it weighed a good deal more.

See David Kloke's replica Leviathan (numbered #63), which is based on the replicas built for the celebration of the Transcontinental Railroad. Completed in 2009, the Leviathan has the same cylinder volume, but rolls on 60" (1,524 mm) drivers and has a boiler pressed to 160 psi (11 bar), generating 13,926 lb (6,317 kg) of tractive effort. Kloke's boiler has 156 two-inch tubes. It's an oil-burner that has a total engine and tender weight of 88,000 lb (39,916 kg).


Class 13 (Locobase 8160)

Data from the NWP 10 - 1950 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See the excellent roster on http://ncespee.railfan.net/rosters/oldnwptxtros.html, access 9 February 2007. Works number was 3831 in February 1876.

Originally operated by the Santa Fe as their #25 Colorado Springs (and renumbered #7, then #45), this Baldwin Eight-wheeler came to the California Northwestern some time later as its #6. Once part of the NWP in 1907, it was renumbered 13.

The 13 was retired in 1929.


Class 14/90 (Locobase 8167)

Data from the NWP 10 - 1950 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See the excellent roster on http://ncespee.railfan.net/rosters/oldnwptxtros.html, access 9 February 2007, which shows the works numbers as 1886 and 1885, respectively, in May 1891.

Two very small Eight-wheelers that served the NPC, the North Shore, and the Northwestern Pacific.


Class 2/E-44 - 29 (Locobase 8757)

SP Menke All-Time Steam Loco Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 8, p. 18.

As delivered by Baldwin (works numbers were 3970-3971 in August 1876) these little wood-burning Eight-wheelers had boilers with 112 tubes and drivers measuring 42" (1,067 mm) in diameter. The 2 was totalled in a 1902 wreck; its machinery was used on the Oakland docks as a hoisting engine.

The 3 was incorporated into the Southern Pacific in 1906, by which time it had the 104 tubes and 44" drivers shown in the specifications. In February 1910, the 6 was sold to the Colusa & Lake as their #4. It was later sold to the San Francisco locomotive dealer United Commercial Company. UCC leased it to the Pacific Portland Cement Company's Plaster City Railroad. The 4 was scrapped in 1936.


Class 21 (Locobase 11523)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines, 1903, as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Volume 26, p. 176. Works number was 23392 in December 1903.

Connelly credits it to the Alamarogdo & Sacramento Mountain, but the Specifications state that the tender will be lettered "A & NM Ry". It was a high-stepping locomotive on the metre gauge.


Class 24 (Locobase 8165)

Data from the NWP 10 - 1950 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See the excellent roster on http://ncespee.railfan.net/rosters/oldnwptxtros.html, access 9 February 2007. Works number was 24035 in April 1904.

This Baldwin Eight-wheeler went into service as the SF & NP as their #24. Three years later, the Northwestern Pacific took over the locomotive and renumbered it #21. As happened to the other 4-4-0s from the early days of Redwood Empire railroading, this engine was scrapped in the late 1930s.


Class 36 (Locobase 7236)

Data from the SA&AP 6 - 1917 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Builder's numbers were 606-607, 610-611, 613, 690.

The SA & AP was chartered in 1884 to build a line between San Antonio and the Aransas Bay on the Gulf of Mexico near Corpus Christi. Over the next 16 years, lines radiated from San Antonio to Corpus Christi, Kerrville, and, through Kenedy (sic) Junction to Houston. From the latter line, another line ran northwest from Yoakum to Waco. The excellent Texas History site says that by 1891, the SA & AP comprised 688 main-line miles.

Possibly the railroad grew too fast. In any event, it had entered receivership in 1890. The Southern Pacific acquired it in 1892, but was forced by the Railroad Commission of Texas to divest itself of the road in 1903. Further extension south towards Brownsville on the Mexican border at the mouth of the Rio Grande was begun, but not completed for 20 years.

In 1925, the ICC gave permission to the Espee to take control of the SA & AP. The Espee leased the railroad to the Galveston, Harrisburg & San Antonio Railway for a few years until it was merged into the Texas & New Orleans, a major component of the Southern Pacific, in 1934.


Class 38 (Locobase 7235)

Data from the SA&AP 6 - 1917 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See the detailed summary of the SA&AP at Locobase 7236. Builder's numbers were 608-609 in 1891.

The SA & AP was chartered in August 1884 to build a railroad between San Antonio and Aransas Bay at Corpus Christi. The distance of the mainline was 135 miles (217 km).

These two small Eight-wheelers received new boilers in 1912 and served the road into the 1930s. 70 was scrapped in February 1930 whle 69 lasted until January 1937.


Class 50 (Locobase 7238)

Data from the SA&AP 6 - 1917 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. (See Locobase 7235 for a description of this SouthEast Texas railroad.) Locobase guesses that the diagram is wrong on the tube diameter (it says 2") because the tube length and number doesn't permit so large a heating surface otherwise.

The SA&AP treated these locomotives as belonging to distinct classes depending on the year they were acquired, but the available data is identical except for the wheelbases. 50 had the driving wheelbase shown in the specs, 54-56 measured 1/2" longer at 8' 6" (8.5 ft) , 51 lengthened to 8' 9" (8.75 ft) and 153 had a 9' wheelbase. 51's diagram doesn't show engine wheelbase, but 153's shows 23' 10" (23.83 ft) and a total engine-and-tender wheelbase of 60' 7" (60.58 ft). 153 also put more adhesion weight on the rail with 67,300 lb, which produced an engine weight of 103,700 lb.

NB: Although the SA&AP listed their original builder as Baldwin, no amount of cross-checking with Gene Connelly's lists or the relevant specifications books from the DeGolyer Library turns up any locomotives that match this group's data. Similar searches in Brooks, Cooke, Pittsburgh, or Richmond lists yield no likely candidates.

Locobase can only say that they were typical mixed-traffic turn-of-the-century Eight-wheelers and the SA&AP got them second-hand beginning in 1908 (50 & 51), 1909 (153), and 1910 (54-56)


Class 51 (Locobase 8166)

Data from the NWP 10 - 1950 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See the excellent roster on http://ncespee.railfan.net/rosters/oldnwptxtros.html, access 9 February 2007. Works numbers were 54580-54583 in 1914.

Interesting quartet of Eight-wheelers with small first courses in their boilers compared to the much larger barrel behind the taper. The small steam dome sat over the first driven axle. Another key feature was the design's size, which came quite a bit bigger than most other NWP locomotives of any arrangement.

These engines, like all of the other NWP 4-4-0s, were scrapped in the late 1930s as passenger traffic dwindled.


Class 60 / E-40 (Locobase 8657)

Data from the T&NO 3 -1932 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Vol 71, pp. 157. Works numbers were 55390-55393 in May 1922.

Bought only a few years before the SA&AP was leased to the Texas & New Orleans (itself wholly owned by the Southern Pacific), this quartet of Eight-wheelers offers plenty of surprises. Certainly the pains taken to generate useful steam stand out in these small locomotives. A large firebox with an equally imposing grate provides generous direct heating surface, supplemented by a tidy superheater layout. 8" (203 mm) piston valves conveyed the steam to the cylinders. The Baldwin spec shows a superheater area of 242 sq ft (22.5 sq m).

This class served Texas railroading right through World War II and beyond. Two went to the ferro-knacker's yard in 1947 (223 in September, 222 in December); the other two served until 1954, when 221 was scrapped and 220 was sold to Louisiana Engineering as their #1 in September.


Class 70 / E-39 (Locobase 8653)

Data from the T&NO 3 -1932 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Vol 71, p. 161. Works numbers were 58084-58087, 58096 in November 1924.

For some reason, when the SA&AP went back to Baldwin for more small Eight-wheelers, they shrank the design still further from that of the 60s that went into service in 1922 (Locobase 8657). The cylinders were narrowed by an inch, the boiler and grate both shrank, and the axle loading dropped by 2 tons (1.8 metric tonnes). Piston valve diameter remained 8" (203 mm).

Apparently the size was satisfactory for the service as the engines served the SA&AP and the Texas & New Orleans (which leased the SA & AP later in the 1920s) as the E-39 class right through World War II, after which they all headed to scrapyards in March-April 1947.


Class 854 (Locobase 11111)

Data from Schenectady Locomotive Works, Illustrated Catalogue of Simple and Compound Locomotives (Philadelphia: J B Lippincott, 1897), pp. 22-25 and from T&NO 3 - 1932 Locomotive Diagrams books supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

These were delivered as saturated-steam engines sold to a variety of SP lines. The Schenectady catalogue shows both Southern Pacific and the Houston & Texas Central. They were all later superheated, according to the Texas & New Orleans diagram book, which records the following original numbers:

1895 production

H & TC 240-249

1899

L W 250-252

T & NO 253-256

G H & SA 256-258

All were superheated to a common design; see Locobase 8654.


Class 9 (Locobase 8159)

Data from the NWP 10 - 1950 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See the excellent roster on http://ncespee.railfan.net/rosters/oldnwptxtros.html, access 9 February 2007.

The Redwood Empire Route was founded in the early 1900s as a joint venture by the Southern Pacific and the Santa Fe to open up the thousands of acres of old-growth redwood forests in Northern California. A history of the Northwestern Pacific published on a dedicated website -- http://sunnyfortuna.com/railroad/index.htm -- says that the NWP eventually comprised over 60 logging railroads.

It was opened in 1907 and absorbed the Eureka and Klamath in 1914. In 1929 the Espee bought out the AT & SF's share.

These 4-4-0s originally went to the San Francisco & North Pacific (renamed California Northwestern in 1893 and incorporated into the NWP in 1907). These Eight-wheelers came to the SF & NP in two groups - 2 in 1883 (works #1664-1665) and one in 1888. 9 & 10 bore the names Marin and Healdsburg, respectively. 10 was scrapped in 1937, 14 in 1938, and 9 was converted to a stationary boiler in 1938.


Class 93 (Locobase 8169)

Data from the NWP 10 - 1950 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 12, p. 43. Baldwin works numbers were 7236 in March 1884 and 7249 in April.

A small skinny-gauge Eight-wheeler whose provenance is given on the Northwestern Pacific roster presented on http://ncespee.railfan.net/rosters/oldnwptxtros.html, last accessed 22 September 2007. Given the 126 ft/mile grades (2.4%) and 16 degree curves, the specs called for "sufficient clearance between cylinder part of boiler and main driving wheel." They called for 114 tubes in the boiler, so a new boiler likely was the home for the 108 shown in the NWP diagram.

It had good proportions and was well-balanced in grate and heating surface areas and the ratio between those areas and the cylinder volume. The drivers stood relatively tall, promising a good turn of speed. But the specs also contain a note reporting "Blombaugh's" discontent with the lightness of the trucks, cast iron crossties also "too light", back engine frame not stiff enough. Tender truck journals were specified as 3 1/2" in diameter and 6" long, but a note that the size should have been 4" x 6 1/2".


Class CA/E-1 (Locobase 8703)

Data from the SP Menke All-Time Steam Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works numbers were 1848-1850 in 1883.

1432 was a survivor of three locomotives when it was scrapped in 1928; 1430-1431 were scrapped in 1913 (December and June, respectively). The 6' 1" drivers show it to have been a fast passenger locomotive at one point. And the general layout, with the cylindrical dome right over the crown sheet indicates its 1880s Century origins.


Class CB/E-2 & E-6 (Locobase 8704)

Data from the SP Menke All-Time Steam Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works numbers were 2207-2209 in December 1886, 2464-2466 in September 1887, 2746-2751 in December 1888.

A dozen of these locomotives formed two subclasses. Locobase guesses, based on the 1898 Pacific Division Classification, that E-2 consisted of those numbered in the 200 series (210-212, 223-225) and E-6 the 300 series (377-382).


Class Cloverdale (Locobase 8161)

Data from the NWP 10 - 1950 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See the excellent roster on http://ncespee.railfan.net/rosters/oldnwptxtros.html, access 9 February 2007.

Among the first to operate for the SF & NP, these two bore road number 6-7 and were named Cloverdale and Petaluma, respectively. When the Northwestern Pacific took over the SF & NP, these engines were renumbered.


Class E-22 (Locobase 8654)

Data from the T&NO 3 - 1932 Locomotive Diagrams books supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. The date for superheating is estimated.

These were delivered as saturated-steam engines and later superheated, perhaps by the Texas & New Orleans Railroad to which they were later sold.


Class E-23 (Locobase 8705)

Data from the T&NO 3 - 1932 Locomotive Diagrams books supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection is the source for specifications. See also the Espee's promotional magazine The Sunset, vol 4, #2 (December 1899) p. 76. Cooke produced several batches for both the Espee and the Galveston, Harrisburg & San Antonio. Works numbers were 2487-2491 in November 1899 for SP 1100-1104 , 2573-2586 in September 1900 for SP 1105-1118, and 2587-2590 in September 1900 for GH & SA 925-928

Although renumbered 261-265, the 5 for the GH & SA retained its herald until 1 March 1927 when the railway was leased to the Texas & New Orleans.

The Sunset article noted that "These new locomotives have a capacity for drawing twelve to fifteen car trains on fairly level track at an emergency speed of 80 to 85 miles per hour, and will prove a very important addition to the already large motive power equipment of the Southern Pacific, increasing the efficiency of passenger service and going far to insure punctual arrival at terminals."

Locobase believes the class was superheated before then; see Locobase 8655 for the result.

Seven years later, on 30 June 1934, the GH & SA independent identity was merged with that of the T & NO.

At that time, according to the Handbook of Texas, the GH & SA operated 40% of the SP's trackage in Texas, a total of 1,345 miles.


Class E-23 - superheated (Locobase 8655)

Data from the SP Menke All-Time Locomotive Diagrams books supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection is the source for specifications.

Like many SP engines, regardless of origins, this class acquired a superheater. In this case, probably because of the small boiler, the tube-flue tradeoff didn't yield an impressive ratio of superheated area. On the other hand, it was drier steam.

The quintet served into the 1940s, the first being retired in 1941, the last in 1951.


Class E-24 (Locobase 8706)

Data from the SP Menke All-Time Steam Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

These are all ex-Union Pacific engines. 1459-1463 first entered service as Rogers-built locomotives on the Union Pacific numbered 831-833 and 841-842; see Locobase 6586.


Class E-27 (Locobase 13785)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 37, p. 1. Works numbers were 36195-36204 in March 1911 and 36376-36380 in April.

This set of Eight-wheelers came in a two batches and were derived from the Harriman Standard design used by the Associated Lines over the previous decade in Mogul locomotives. The cylinders were served by 12"-diameter piston valves. Water and oil traveled in the increasingly standard SP Vanderbilt cylindrical tender.

The class was later superheated; see Locobase 8714.


Class E-27 - superheated (Locobase 8714)

Data from the SP Menke All-Time Steam Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

When the Baldwin 4-4-0s described in Locobase 13785 were superheated, the railroad not only did not reduce boiler pressure as many shops did during such conversions, but it increased BP by 20 psi.

Big and powerful for 4-4-0s, the class persisted for perhaps another decade in light passenger service before being scrapped from August 1935 to February 1936.


Class E-35 (Locobase 8715)

Data from the SP Menke All-Time Steam Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 26, p. 176. Works number was 23392 in December 1903.

One of the treats for the Locobase compiler (moi) is discovering obscure railways through the locomotives they passed along to more enduring lines. So while this little Eight-wheeler wound up on the Espee via the El Paso & Southwestern via the El Paso & Northeastern, it started out with the "Cloud-Climbing Railway". See Locobase 12068 for a description of the A & SM.

The 21 (later the 97 and still later the 1415) didn't last anywhere nearly that long, being scrapped in November 1925.


Class E-36 (Locobase 8716)

Data from the SP Menke All-Time Steam Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See the excellent article on "Logging Railroad Technology", found at http://www.foresthistory.org/ASPNET/Publications/region/3/lincoln/cultres4/sec3.htm . Works number was 32290 in November 1907.

Four years after the A & SM took delivery of a smallish, 63" Eight-wheeler (Locobase 8715), it went back to Baldwin for this larger version that had taller drivers. As hilly and twisting as was the A & SM, it's hard to figure where the railway could put even 67" drivers to use. And the diagram's optimistic calculation that at 60 mph, the driver rpm would 301, probably doesn't reflect actual service conditions.

NB: Baldwin's specifications show the 27's as being lettered for the Arizona & New Mexico.


Class E-43 (Locobase 8755)

SP Menke All-Time Steam Loco Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection

At some point in the lives of these engines, which originally served the Carson & Colorado (see Locobase 14251), they received new boilers. The original set of 1 3/4" tubes was replaced by the fewer, larger-diameter tubes shown in this entry. Firebox heating surface area increased primarily because of a deeper firebox.


Class E-44 (Locobase 8754)

SP Menke All-Time Steam Loco Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection

These two rebuilt locomotives originally arrived on the Carson & Colorado in the 1880s as members of two different classes, distinguished by their driver diameters. Their specifications are available in Locobase 14251-14252.


Class E-44 (Locobase 8756)

SP Menke All-Time Steam Loco Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection

Locobase 14251 shows the original Carson & Colorado locomotives delivered in 1881-1882. At some point, the C&C, the Nevada & California, or the Southern Pacific rebuilt the design with a new boiler filled with fewer, but larger-diameter boiler tubes.


Class E-73 (Locobase 8656)

Data from the T&NO 3 - 1932 Locomotive Diagrams books supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Although these locomotives are shown under the T & NO herald, they actually served several Texas railways. 266 operated on the Gulf, Harrisburg & San Antonio (which came under T & NO sway in 1927), 267-270 on the ML & T (which Locobase has striven to identify), 271 on the Louisiana Western, and the 272 on the T & NO itself.


Class Governor Stanford (Locobase 8885)

Data from Appendix to the Journals of the Senate and Assembly of the 31st Session of the California Legislature, Volume II (Sacramento, CA, 1895), Transactions of State Agricultural Society, Transportation Exhibit, p.170. Works number was 1040 in 1862.

Norris produced this locomotive in 1862, after which the engine survived a trip around Cape Horn. As delivered to Sacramento in 1863, the engine had 15" x 22" cylinders and its boiler was pressed to 100 psi. Even for its time, this was a small locomotive.

The data refer to the 1878 rebuilding, which is the engine described in the 1895 Appendix.

On 6 November 1863 the railroad lit the boiler and raised steam. As work progressed, this diamond-stacked woodburner was the first on the CPRR to pull an excursion train. Later milestones in 1864 included the first revenue freight (25 March) and the first scheduled passenger train (15 April).

It was soon too small for regular service, particularly in its original configuration. Consequently, it was relegated to on-call fire-fighter and switcher until it was retired in 1895. Preserved as a gift to Stanford University, the locomotive was restored in the 1890s for steaming.

Much later, it was again cosmetically restored (to the 1899 configuration) for static display.


Class Lytton (Locobase 8162)

Data from the NWP 10 - 1950 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See the excellent roster on http://ncespee.railfan.net/rosters/oldnwptxtros.html, access 9 February 2007.

The SF & NP took delivery of this pair of Eight-wheelers (works #4155, 4154). Numbered 17 & 16 respectively, they bore the names Lytton & Vichy. A photo of the Vichy shows the very large steam dome standing over the crown sheet.

Passing to the Northwestern Pacific 1907, 16 (now 18) was scrapped in 1910 (possibly a wreck or boiler problem?) while the 17 lasted until 1935.


Class Peter Donahue / 19 (Locobase 8163)

Data from the NWP 10 - 1950 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See the excellent roster on http://ncespee.railfan.net/rosters/oldnwptxtros.html, access 9 February 2007.

Rogers sent this engine and the Tom Rogers (see Locobase 8164) to the SF & NP in 1884 (works #3305) as their #12.

Taken over by the Northwestern Pacific in 1907 and renumbered, the 19 was scrapped in 1937.


Class Tom Rogers / 20 (Locobase 8164)

Data from the NWP 10 - 1950 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See the excellent roster on http://ncespee.railfan.net/rosters/oldnwptxtros.html, access 9 February 2007. See the excellent roster on http://ncespee.railfan.net/rosters/oldnwptxtros.html, access 9 February 2007.

Although this locomotive immediately followed the Peter Donahue (see Locobase 8163) on the SF & NP in 1884 (works #3306), the #13 had slightly different boiler dimensions than the 12.

Taken over by the Northwestern Pacific in 1907 and renumbered, the 20 was scrapped in 1937.

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class110/E-5112281314/90
Locobase ID7237 8758 12998 8160 8167
RailroadSan Antonio & Aransas Pass (SP)South Pacific Coast (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)Northwestern Pacific (SP)North Pacific Coast (SP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class22112
Road Numbers1-2/31, 339-1012281314-15/90, 92
GaugeStd3'StdStd3'
Number Built2212
BuilderBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoSPBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoBrooks
Year18851885189218761891
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase 8.10' 8.50'8' 8.33'7'
Engine Wheelbase21.79'20.92'21.54'23.12'18.42'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.37 0.41 0.37 0.36 0.38
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)49.43'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers52830 lbs33000 lbs50600 lbs49000 lbs52600 lbs
Engine Weight80700 lbs52000 lbs80150 lbs79240 lbs70100 lbs
Tender Light Weight90500 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight171200 lbs
Tender Water Capacity2800 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)1600 gals gals gals gals gals
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)44 lb/yard28 lb/yard42 lb/yard41 lb/yard44 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter62"51"64"63"48"
Boiler Pressure135 psi135 psi150 psi140 psi140 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)16" x 24"15" x 18"16" x 24"16" x 24"15" x 20"
Tractive Effort11371 lbs9113 lbs12240 lbs11605 lbs11156 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.65 3.62 4.13 4.22 4.71
Heating Ability
Firebox Area102 sq. ft71 sq. ft104 sq. ft85.21 sq. ft78.70 sq. ft
Grate Area14.75 sq. ft11 sq. ft15 sq. ft15 sq. ft14 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface888 sq. ft596 sq. ft1120 sq. ft984 sq. ft852 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface888 sq. ft596 sq. ft1120 sq. ft984 sq. ft852 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume159.00161.89200.54176.18208.28
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation19911485225021001960
Same as above plus superheater percentage19911485225021001960
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area137709585156001192911018
Power L134922964469837113410
Power MT291.45396.03409.38333.93285.85

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class2/E-44 - 2921243638
Locobase ID8757 11523 8165 7236 7235
RailroadSouth Pacific Coast (SP)Arizona & New Mexico (SP)San Francisco & North Pacific (SP)San Antonio & Aransas Pass (SP)San Antonio & Aransas Pass (SP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class21172
Road Numbers2-3/62124 / 2136-37, 40-45 / 67-68, 71-7538-39 / 69-70
Gauge3'StdStdStdStd
Number Built21172
BuilderSPCBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoNew York (Rome)New York (Rome)
Year18761903190418911891
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase 7.50' 8.50' 8.50'8'8'
Engine Wheelbase18.58'23'22.58'21.92'21.96'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.40 0.37 0.38 0.36 0.36
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)53.70'54'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers29300 lbs60000 lbs79150 lbs53428 lbs56950 lbs
Engine Weight45500 lbs92000 lbs117350 lbs84960 lbs90670 lbs
Tender Light Weight61000 lbs70000 lbs78000 lbs73600 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight153000 lbs187350 lbs162960 lbs164270 lbs
Tender Water Capacity3000 gals3500 gals3500 gals3500 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)1630 gals1800 gals
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)24 lb/yard50 lb/yard66 lb/yard45 lb/yard47 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter44"62"59"62"62"
Boiler Pressure130 psi160 psi180 psi135 psi160 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)12" x 18"17" x 24"18" x 24"16" x 24"16" x 24"
Tractive Effort6509 lbs15214 lbs20165 lbs11371 lbs13477 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.50 3.94 3.93 4.70 4.23
Heating Ability
Firebox Area75 sq. ft136 sq. ft137.50 sq. ft100.50 sq. ft100.50 sq. ft
Grate Area 8.80 sq. ft16.90 sq. ft26 sq. ft15 sq. ft15 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface529 sq. ft1458 sq. ft1751 sq. ft896 sq. ft896 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface529 sq. ft1458 sq. ft1751 sq. ft896 sq. ft896 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume224.51231.24247.72160.43160.43
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation11442704468020252400
Same as above plus superheater percentage11442704468020252400
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area975021760247501356816080
Power L136585606610634934140
Power MT550.48411.97340.15288.27320.53

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class505160 / E-4070 / E-39854
Locobase ID7238 8166 8657 8653 11111
RailroadSan Antonio & Aransas Pass (SP)Northwestern Pacific (SP)San Antonio & Aransas Pass (SP)San Antonio & Aransas Pass (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class644519
Road Numbers50-56, 15351-5460-63 / 220-22370-74 / 205-209854
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built644519
BuilderBurnham, Williams & CoAlcoBaldwinBaldwinSchenectady
Year18981914192219241895
Valve GearStephensonStephensonWalschaertWalschaertStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase 8.48' 8.50'7'7' 8.50'
Engine Wheelbase22.46'23.27'21.33'21.33'23.42'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.38 0.37 0.33 0.33 0.36
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)58'47.33'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)36500 lbs32100 lbs
Weight on Drivers64500 lbs105500 lbs73000 lbs64200 lbs75400 lbs
Engine Weight100000 lbs158500 lbs112900 lbs102300 lbs120400 lbs
Tender Light Weight81400 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight181400 lbs
Tender Water Capacity4500 gals4000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)2300 gals gals gals gals gals
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)54 lb/yard88 lb/yard61 lb/yard54 lb/yard63 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter62"63"62"62"69"
Boiler Pressure140 psi200 psi180 psi180 psi180 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)18" x 24"19" x 26"18" x 24"17" x 24"19" x 24"
Tractive Effort14925 lbs25327 lbs19189 lbs17116 lbs19211 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.32 4.17 3.80 3.75 3.92
Heating Ability
Firebox Area136 sq. ft175 sq. ft114 sq. ft98 sq. ft138.90 sq. ft
Grate Area17.10 sq. ft28.70 sq. ft22.20 sq. ft21 sq. ft25.20 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1783 sq. ft2217 sq. ft1171 sq. ft944 sq. ft1872 sq. ft
Superheating Surface201 sq. ft153 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface1783 sq. ft2217 sq. ft1372 sq. ft1097 sq. ft1872 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume252.24259.84165.66149.72237.69
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation23945740399637804536
Same as above plus superheater percentage23945740459543094536
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area1904035000235982011025002
Power L150417610934182936746
Power MT344.60318.05564.20569.56394.49

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class993CA/E-1CB/E-2 & E-6Cloverdale
Locobase ID8159 8169 8703 8704 8161
RailroadSan Francisco & North Pacific (SP)South Pacific Coast (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)San Francisco & North Pacific (SP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class323122
Road Numbers9-10, 1415, 14/19, 17/86, 85/9350-52/73-75/1430-1432210-12, 223-225, 377-382/1370-138111-12
GaugeStd3'StdStdStd
Number Built323122
BuilderGrantBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoSchenectadySchenectadyGrant
Year18831884188318861878
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase8' 8.17' 8.50' 8.50'8'
Engine Wheelbase21.75'20.42'22.92'22.92'21.75'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.37 0.40 0.37 0.37 0.37
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers54000 lbs32000 lbs63000 lbs63000 lbs45200 lbs
Engine Weight86300 lbs47200 lbs92000 lbs92000 lbs70250 lbs
Tender Light Weight
Total Engine and Tender Weight
Tender Water Capacity1500 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)45 lb/yard27 lb/yard53 lb/yard53 lb/yard38 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter59"52"73"69"63"
Boiler Pressure140 psi140 psi160 psi150 psi145 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)16" x 24"14" x 18"18" x 24"18" x 24"16" x 24"
Tractive Effort12392 lbs8074 lbs14487 lbs14369 lbs12020 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.36 3.96 4.35 4.38 3.76
Heating Ability
Firebox Area102 sq. ft75 sq. ft132 sq. ft132 sq. ft93 sq. ft
Grate Area14.12 sq. ft10 sq. ft17 sq. ft17 sq. ft14 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1116 sq. ft625 sq. ft1329 sq. ft1329 sq. ft936 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface1116 sq. ft625 sq. ft1329 sq. ft1329 sq. ft936 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume199.82194.88188.02188.02167.59
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation19771400272025502030
Same as above plus superheater percentage19771400272025502030
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area1428010500211201980013485
Power L140083783547848543819
Power MT327.26521.25383.39339.72372.54

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassE-22E-23E-23 - superheatedE-24E-27
Locobase ID8654 8705 8655 8706 13785
RailroadHouston & Texas Central (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)Galveston, Harrisburg & San Antonio (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class10551315
Road Numbers240-249261-265261-2651459-14711526-1540
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built5513
BuilderSchenectadyCookeCookeBaldwin
Year19151900191618991911
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase 8.50' 8.50' 8.50' 8.83'9'
Engine Wheelbase23.42'23.92'23.92'24.75'24.50'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.36 0.36 0.36 0.36 0.37
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)53.25'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)39500 lbs46500 lbs50000 lbs
Weight on Drivers79000 lbs92000 lbs93000 lbs74000 lbs100000 lbs
Engine Weight120950 lbs137420 lbs139330 lbs113400 lbs146000 lbs
Tender Light Weight138070 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight284070 lbs
Tender Water Capacity7000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)2940 gals
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)66 lb/yard77 lb/yard78 lb/yard62 lb/yard83 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter69"73"73.50"69"73"
Boiler Pressure180 psi190 psi190 psi165 psi190 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)19" x 24"20" x 24"20" x 24"18" x 26"20" x 26"
Tractive Effort19211 lbs21238 lbs21094 lbs17123 lbs23008 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.11 4.33 4.41 4.32 4.35
Heating Ability
Firebox Area140 sq. ft156 sq. ft168 sq. ft123 sq. ft176 sq. ft
Grate Area25.20 sq. ft30.20 sq. ft30.20 sq. ft16.75 sq. ft28 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1395 sq. ft2072 sq. ft1556 sq. ft1360 sq. ft2350 sq. ft
Superheating Surface263 sq. ft254 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface1658 sq. ft2072 sq. ft1810 sq. ft1360 sq. ft2350 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume177.12237.43178.30177.60248.58
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation45365738573827645320
Same as above plus superheater percentage52625738654127645320
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area2923229640363892029533440
Power L11172775551248748947898
Power MT654.52362.08592.02291.61348.24

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassE-27 - superheatedE-35E-36E-43E-44
Locobase ID8714 8715 8716 8755 8754
RailroadSouthern Pacific (SP)Alamagordo & Sacramento Mountain (SP)Alamagordo & Sacramento Mountain (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class151122
Road Numbers1526-154021 / 141527 / 98 / 14165, 74, 8
GaugeStdStdStd3'3'
Number Built11
BuilderSPBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & Co
Year19031907
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase9' 8.50' 8.75' 8.33' 8.17'
Engine Wheelbase24.50'23'22.83'20.12'20.04'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.37 0.37 0.38 0.41 0.41
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)47.73'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers113000 lbs60000 lbs66000 lbs32000 lbs32000 lbs
Engine Weight180000 lbs92000 lbs102000 lbs48000 lbs48000 lbs
Tender Light Weight61000 lbs80000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight153000 lbs182000 lbs
Tender Water Capacity3000 gals4000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)12.5 tons17.7 tons tons tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)94 lb/yard50 lb/yard55 lb/yard27 lb/yard27 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter73"63"67"43"44"
Boiler Pressure210 psi160 psi160 psi140 psi140 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)20" x 26"17" x 24"18" x 24"14" x 18"14" x 18"
Tractive Effort25430 lbs14973 lbs15784 lbs9764 lbs9542 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.44 4.01 4.18 3.28 3.35
Heating Ability
Firebox Area180 sq. ft139 sq. ft131.30 sq. ft74 sq. ft70 sq. ft
Grate Area27.90 sq. ft17.10 sq. ft17.50 sq. ft10 sq. ft 9.90 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1817 sq. ft1472 sq. ft1450 sq. ft635 sq. ft766 sq. ft
Superheating Surface326 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface2143 sq. ft1472 sq. ft1450 sq. ft635 sq. ft766 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume192.20233.47205.13198.00238.85
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation58592736280014001386
Same as above plus superheater percentage67382736280014001386
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area434702224021008103609800
Power L1152725774532431443573
Power MT595.91424.32355.68433.21492.32

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassE-44E-73Governor StanfordLyttonPeter Donahue / 19
Locobase ID8756 8656 8885 8162 8163
RailroadSouthern Pacific (SP)Texas & New Orleans (SP)Central Pacific (SP)San Francisco & North Pacific (SP)San Francisco & North Pacific (SP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class27121
Road Numbers5, 7266-2721 / 117416-1719
Gauge3'StdStdStdStd
Number Built7121
BuilderShopsseveralNorrisRogersRogers
Year1898186218891884
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase 8.33' 8.50' 8.50' 8.75'
Engine Wheelbase20.12'23.92'19.58'22.83'23'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.41 0.36 0.37 0.38
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)46500 lbs
Weight on Drivers32000 lbs93000 lbs35700 lbs55300 lbs62000 lbs
Engine Weight48000 lbs139330 lbs56000 lbs87300 lbs93800 lbs
Tender Light Weight
Total Engine and Tender Weight
Tender Water Capacity
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)27 lb/yard78 lb/yard30 lb/yard46 lb/yard52 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter44"73.50"57"63"61"
Boiler Pressure140 psi190 psi125 psi140 psi165 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)14" x 18"20" x 24"16" x 22"17" x 24"18" x 24"
Tractive Effort9542 lbs21094 lbs10498 lbs13101 lbs17878 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.35 4.41 3.40 4.22 3.47
Heating Ability
Firebox Area70 sq. ft168 sq. ft88.15 sq. ft127 sq. ft101 sq. ft
Grate Area10 sq. ft30.20 sq. ft13.61 sq. ft16.70 sq. ft17.20 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface626 sq. ft1556 sq. ft847 sq. ft1181 sq. ft1218 sq. ft
Superheating Surface254 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface626 sq. ft1810 sq. ft847 sq. ft1181 sq. ft1218 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume195.20178.30165.44187.31172.31
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation14005738170123382838
Same as above plus superheater percentage14006541170123382838
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area980036389110191778016665
Power L1312412487298742344089
Power MT430.45592.02368.92337.59290.80

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassTom Rogers / 20
Locobase ID8164
RailroadSan Francisco & North Pacific (SP)
CountryUSA
Whyte4-4-0
Number in Class1
Road Numbers20
GaugeStd
Number Built1
BuilderRogers
Year1884
Valve GearStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase 8.75'
Engine Wheelbase22.92'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.38
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers60900 lbs
Engine Weight91300 lbs
Tender Light Weight
Total Engine and Tender Weight
Tender Water Capacity
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)51 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter61"
Boiler Pressure165 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)18" x 24"
Tractive Effort17878 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.41
Heating Ability
Firebox Area104.80 sq. ft
Grate Area17 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1219 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface1219 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume172.45
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation2805
Same as above plus superheater percentage2805
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area17292
Power L14136
Power MT299.45

Reference


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