Idaho Northern / Kansas Pacific / Oregon Railway & Navigation / San Pedro, Los Angeles & Salt Lake / St Joseph & Grand Island / St.Joseph & Grand Island / Union Pacific 4-4-0 "American" Locomotives of the USA


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class 149 / 807 / 931 (Locobase 7440)

Data from 1918 Union Pacific Locomotives & Tenders diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Builder and roster data from Don Strack's compilation presented on Utah Rails' http://utahrails.net/steam/up03-upsys1885-1898-06.php . Taunton works numbers were 657-663 and 664-668.

Based on the 737 shown in Locobase 5088, this class shared many components with that class. Two differences were the shorter boiler tubes and the taller drivers. Most retained their 24" cylinders, but the 816 and 819 received 26"-diameter cylinders in Nov 1892 and Aug 1893.


Class 15 (Locobase 6572)

Data from 1914 ST J & GI locomotive diagram supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works numbers were 1360-1363 in March 1884.

Weight data is the best reading from the diagram, but cannot be confirmed fully.


Class 20 (Locobase 6573)

Data from 1914 ST J & GI locomotive diagram supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

The diagram tells us that the data reflects the St J & GI's rebuild in 1890. Taunton delivered the original in 1874 as works #20.


Class 200 (Locobase 14065)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 45, p. 150. Works number was 33302 in March 1909.

The IN went back to Baldwin for an Eight-wheeler about 2 years after Ten-wheeler 101 (Locobase 13060) rolled into Nampa, Ida. The 200 appears to be a truncated 101 in its use of the same number of tubes cut to a slightly shorter length. The grate was larger, the wheelbase shorter, the drivers taller.

As the IN passed into the hands first of the Oregon Short Line, the 200 was renumbered 325. In 1915, OSL parent Union Pacific renumbered it 1008.


Class 21 (Locobase 6574)

Data from 1914 ST J & GI locomotive diagram supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

The diagram tells us that the data reflects the St J & GI's rebuild in 1893. Taunton delivered the original in 1874 as works #41. The 1893 makeover yielded a locomotive identical in its principal areas and dimensions to the Baldwin Moguls of 1885 (see Locobase 6576).


Class 22 (Locobase 6575)

Data from 1914 ST J & GI locomotive diagram supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. In the diagram, the works number was given as 7767, which doesn't match any listing.

This Eight-wheeler was a slight enlargement of the 15 class that had arrived a year earlier.


Class 600/900 (Locobase 5088)

Data from Union Pacific locomotive diagram drawn up in September 1898 as reproduced in the National Park Service's study of Steamtown's #737. According to the report, #737 was delivered in 1887 "...as part of one of the largest locomotive orders on record up to that date.." .

The highest road number--725-750-- in this class were assigned to the earliest batch, the 25 that Baldwin delivered in 1887; works numbers were 8372, 8375, 8381-8383, 8385-8389, 8394-8395, 8399, 8401-8406 in February 1887; 8408-8411, 8423-8424 in June.

In 1888, New York Locomotive Works (of Rome, NY) delivered 690-699 (works numbers 365-374), 680-689 (works numbers 395-404), and 660-669 (works numbers 434-443). Pittsburgh Locomotive Works also contributed, supplying seven locomotives (works numbers 1015-1021) in 1888 and three more (works numbers 1022-1024) in 1889.

Rhode Island Locomotive Works supplied 635-659, in 1889 (works numbers 2153-2177) in company with Schenectady, whose works numbers 2772-2796 took road numbers 610-634.

Rhode Island finished off the class in 1890 with road numbers 600-609 (works numbers 2441-2450)

As delivered, the engine had a shallow diamond stack, long "cowcatcher" with vertical bars and plain, squared domes for sand and steam.

A comparison with other Locobase 4-4-0s of similar vintage shows that while the 600 class was in the middle of the pack in terms of heating surface and offered a relatively small grate, it had a deep firebox with lots of area. Taken all in all, it's highly representative of a dual-service eight-wheeler of the era.

Over the years, those members of the class that remained with the Union Pacific were refitted with an extended smokebox and "shotgun" stack. See the report for 737's extended operating life with the Southern Pacific and the Erath & Vermilion Sugar Companies in Vermilion Bayou.

Many of the class wound up on UP subsidiaries or were later sold through locomotive rebuilder/reseller F M Hicks to a wide variety of operators.


Class 760 (Locobase 2849)

Data from Alexander, Iron Horse, p. l 81 and from MTmoires et compte-rendu des travaux?

by SociTtT des ingTnieurs civils de France, Vol 2 (1888), pp. 204-206.

Camelbacks (also known as Mother Hubbards) were almost always associated with Northeast anthracite roads, where their wide, wide Wootten fireboxes provided the grate area needed to burn that type of coal. In the Nebraska and Wyoming sections of the Union Pacific, a Wootten firebox could burn fine coal or the slack from coal mining. So Clement Hackney, superintendent of the road designed these engines to take advantage of the fuel on hand. Unlike the eastern camelbacks, these had a full cab for the fireman.

The class was converted to a standard firebox and cab in 1892; see Locobase 6585.


Class 780 (Locobase 2154)

Data from Catalogue Descriptive of Simple and Compound Locomotives built by Brooks Locomotive Works, Dunkirk, NY (Buffalo, NY: Matthew-Northrup Company, 1899).

Builder info from B.Rumary, 25 Kingscombe, Gurney Slade, Radstock, BA3 4TH, ENGLAND and Jeremy Lambert as supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004. Works numbers were 1380-1389 in June 1888.

Classic '80s American with coned boiler topped by smallish steam dome just ahead of large wooden cab.

Most of the class saw out their days on the Union Pacific. 1383 went to affiliate Fort Worth & Denver as their 39 and 1380 followed as #40. 1382 was sold to Texas & New Orleans RR as that line's 247; it was renumbered 217 later on. And 1386 eventually served the Chicago, Memphis & Gulf as #3.


Class 831 (Locobase 6585)

Data from 1897 Union Pacific Locomotives & Tenders Folio 200 supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Builder and roster data from Don Strack's compilation presented on Utah Rails' http://utahrails.net/steam/up03-upsys1885-1898-06.php . Strack's compilation tells us that this class was delivered as camelbacks with big Wootten fireboxes; see Locobase 2849.

Disposition of the class took several forms. Three (836, 838-839) were sold to F M Hicks Locomotive and Car Company in 1901 (2) and 1904 (1). Five were sold to the Souther Pacific Lines, 4 receiving SP road numbers -- 831-833, 840 renumbered to 1459-1462 -- and 834 became CRY & P 101 and ultimately the SPdeM 161.


Class 842 (Locobase 6586)

Data from 1897 Union Pacific Locomotives & Tenders Folio 200 supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

This was a rebuilt locomotive. It originally arrived on the Kansas Pacific in November 1866 as the Wea and was numbered 15. The other engine in the pair was the Otoe (#14); their Baldwin works numbers were 1540-1541. Renumbered several times, the 842 was sold in 1909 to the Ferrocarril de Sonora in Northern Mexico as their class E-25 (road 154). This now ancient locomotive was retired in Februasry 1842.


Class 890 (Locobase 9716)

Data from Angus Sinclair, "Ratio of Heating Surface to Grate Area and Cylinder Volume," Locomotive Engineering, Volume X, No. 4 (April 1897), pp. 316-318.

Locobase uses Don Strack's roster posted at http://utahrails.net/steam/up03-upsys1885-1898-06.php to come up with this candidate for Sinclair's subject. According to the notes, the 890-891 were delivered some time earlier (he cannot say when), but were rebuilt with the cylinder dimensions and driver diameter shown in February 1897 and May 1898.

890 and 891 were later sold to the Los Angeles, San Pedro & Salt Lake in 1913.


Class 932 - superheated (Locobase 8334)

Data from UP 10 - 1936 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Locobase is surprised to see that the Union Pacific went to the trouble of superheating thisRaildata collection of 1880s Eight-wheelers. Indeed, the small scale of the superheater was apparently unrivalled in North American railroading. Some British 4-4-0s featured boilers of similar size with even less superheater area, but an American on the American prairies running with such a small superheater was a novelty. Moreover, the usual practice in such small locomotives was to install flues measuring 5 3/8" in diameter; the UP engines had 5 1/2" flues.

On the other hand, one does see the usual gain in performance for what was obviously a niche service.


Class CV 70 / E-70 (Locobase 7261)

Data from SPLA&SL Locomotive Diagram book (the Salt Lake Route) supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works number was 6065 in April 1901.

Originally delivered to the Los Angeles Terminal Company, this Eight-wheeler then came under the LASL rubric. A solo engine, it carried until its retirement in 1925.


Class E-45 (Locobase 7834)

Data from OWRR&NCo 1 - 1930 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 9, p. 255. Builder and roster data from Don Strack's compilation presented on Utah Rails' http://utahrails.net/steam/up03-upsys1885-1898-09.php#oslun1459_4-6-0. Works numbers were 507-510 in October 1889 and 511-512 in November. Baldwin works numbers were 5031-5032, 5034 in March 1880 (road numbers 1, 3, and 5) and 5037-5038 (2 & 4) in April.

Locobase notes that both Utah Rails and Connelly's Baldwin list shows this engine as a Mogul with 37" drivers. Yet the diagram and the designation in the OWRR book is equally clear in calling it an Eight-wheeler. The reason is that the locomotive was converted from one wheel arrangement to the other.


Class E-64 (Locobase 7835)

Data from OWRR&NCo 1 - 1930 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Builder and roster data from Don Strack's compilation presented on Utah Rails' http://utahrails.net/steam/owrrn03-oryn-1894-1896.php . Works numbers were 2444-2445 in September 1890, 2446-2451 in October.

It's interesting to compare this Eight-wheeler to the narrow-gauger that was a decade older (see Locobase 7834). Most of the dimensions are not strikingly bigger in each dimension, but taken as a whole, you have a locomotive that was twice as powerful and ran on the standard gauge.

Almost all of the class served the OWRR & N into the late 1920s, latterly rolling on 62" drivers. 87 was sold to the Idaho Northern in 1909 as their #1, but returned a year later and regained its old number.


Class Pawnee (Locobase 104)

Data from Alfred W Bruce, The Steam Locomotive in America - Its development in the twentieth century (New York: W W Norton, 1952), p. 40-43. Rogers works numbers were 1453, 1456, 1459.

To Alfred Bruce, former director of steam engineering for Alco, "the design ...with its deep firebox dropped down between the frames and the driving axles was typical ...of all the 20,000 engines of the 4-4-0 type built ...between 1840 and 1890."

Bruce's magisterial summary of what the American design -- "one of the most satisfactory ever developed for general-purpose use" -- had to offer is composed of several parts. First, a familiar contention: "The boiler center was low and the engine easily adapted itself to the uneven track of the nineteenth century."

Then a feature perhaps less well appreciated by 21st century historians: "The combustion conditions of the firebox were excellent and well suited to the wood burning so general in the early days."

Some other key values:"The valve gear was accessible [in part because the cylinders were always outside the frame and the main rod always drove the leading coupled axle], and the entire engine was light, well balanced, and easily maintained ...Its very simple three-point weight suspension is one of the most flexible arrangements ever devised." (p. 43)

The Seminole was one of 6 engines named for Indian tribes by the KP. Three of them were delivered with the 16" x 22" cylinders and 56" drivers - these were Pawnee, Comanche, and Seminole. When rebuilt in 1879, they received 58" drivers. T

The other three (Seneca, Choctaw, and Cheyenne) were delivered with different specs. Seneca (16) started with 15 x 22" and 63" drivers, Choctaw (17) had 17 x 24" turning 67" drivers, and Cheyenne (20) was delivered 16 1/2" x 22" with 63" drivers. These were later refitted with 17" x 24" cylinders s and several sizes of drivers. After all of that effort, the last 4 were scrapped in 1888-1889. 16-17 remained in use until the late 1890s.

NB: The direct heating surface (including the firebox heating surface) is an estimate calculated by subtracting the calculated tube heating surface from the reported total evaporative heating surface from the baldwin_steam site.

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class149 / 807 / 931152020021
Locobase ID7440 6572 6573 14065 6574
RailroadUnion Pacific (UP)St.Joseph & Grand Island (UP)St.Joseph & Grand Island (UP)Idaho Northern (UP)St Joseph & Grand Island (UP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class133111
Road Numbers149-155 / 807-819 / 931-94015-18 /20200 / 325 / 100821
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built133111
BuilderTauntonCookeTauntonBurnham, Williams & CoTaunton
Year18751884189019091893
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase 8.83'8' 9.50' 9.08' 9.50'
Engine Wheelbase23.79'22.71'25.04'23.92'25.04'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.37 0.35 0.38 0.38 0.38
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)45.08'47.04'47.04'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)31200 lbs
Weight on Drivers58400 lbs55980 lbs69500 lbs73000 lbs69500 lbs
Engine Weight94100 lbs89660 lbs112500 lbs116000 lbs125000 lbs
Tender Light Weight107233 lbs108000 lbs80000 lbs108000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight201333 lbs220500 lbs196000 lbs233000 lbs
Tender Water Capacity4000 gals3400 gals5280 gals4000 gals5280 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)14 tons9 tons9 tons tons10 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)49 lb/yard47 lb/yard58 lb/yard61 lb/yard58 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter69"63"63"62"63"
Boiler Pressure160 psi150 psi155 psi180 psi155 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)18" x 24"17" x 24"17.5" x 24"18" x 24"18" x 24"
Tractive Effort15327 lbs14037 lbs15371 lbs19189 lbs16262 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.81 3.99 4.52 3.80 4.27
Heating Ability
Firebox Area141.70 sq. ft92 sq. ft121 sq. ft147 sq. ft121 sq. ft
Grate Area16.71 sq. ft15.40 sq. ft16.40 sq. ft18.50 sq. ft16.40 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1348 sq. ft1068 sq. ft1371 sq. ft1639 sq. ft1395 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface1348 sq. ft1068 sq. ft1371 sq. ft1639 sq. ft1395 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume190.70169.39205.20231.87197.35
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation26742310254233302542
Same as above plus superheater percentage26742310254233302542
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area2267213800187552646018755
Power L153533817481362474605
Power MT404.16300.64305.35377.32292.15

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class22600/900760780831
Locobase ID6575 5088 2849 2154 6585
RailroadSt.Joseph & Grand Island (UP)Union Pacific (UP)Union Pacific (UP)Union Pacific (UP)Union Pacific (UP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class1125101010
Road Numbers22600-699, 726-750/900-930760-769780-789831-840
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built11251010
BuilderCookeseveralRogersBrooksUnion Pacific
Year18851887188718881892
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase 8.75' 8.83' 7.51' 8.83' 8.83'
Engine Wheelbase23.43'24.75'22.44'24.75'23.79'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.37 0.36 0.33 0.36 0.37
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)52.10'046.23'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)32000 lbs0
Weight on Drivers60500 lbs62000 lbs76500 lbs63000 lbs70000 lbs
Engine Weight98100 lbs99000 lbs118501 lbs100000 lbs105800 lbs
Tender Light Weight108000 lbs70500 lbs67250 lbs70000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight206100 lbs169500 lbs185751 lbs170000 lbs
Tender Water Capacity5280 gals2900 gals3100 gals2900 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)11 tons8 tons5.5 tons6 tons tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)50 lb/yard52 lb/yard64 lb/yard53 lb/yard58 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter63"62"63"63"69"
Boiler Pressure155 psi160 psi160 psi150 psi160 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)18" x 24"18" x 26"18" x 26"18" x 26"18" x 26"
Tractive Effort16262 lbs18478 lbs18185 lbs17049 lbs16604 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.72 3.36 4.21 3.70 4.22
Heating Ability
Firebox Area106 sq. ft141.70 sq. ft175 sq. ft111 sq. ft110.60 sq. ft
Grate Area16.50 sq. ft16.71 sq. ft76 sq. ft17.55 sq. ft16.50 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1076 sq. ft1448 sq. ft1000 sq. ft1426 sq. ft1325 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface1076 sq. ft1448 sq. ft1000 sq. ft1426 sq. ft1325 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume152.22189.09130.59186.22173.03
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation255826741216026332640
Same as above plus superheater percentage255826741216026332640
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area1643022672280001665017696
Power L136984656411440744513
Power MT269.51331.12237.12285.13284.27

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class842890932 - superheatedCV 70 / E-70E-45
Locobase ID6586 9716 8334 7261 7834
RailroadUnion Pacific (UP)Union Pacific (UP)Union Pacific (UP)San Pedro, Los Angeles & Salt Lake (UP)Oregon Railway & Navigation (UP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class12415
Road Numbers842890-891932, 942, 945, 9478/10507-11 / 1-5
GaugeStdStdStdStd3'
Number Built15
BuilderUPshopsUPSchenectadyBurnham, Parry, Williams & Co
Year18921897192019011880
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase 8.83' 8.83' 8.50' 8.17'
Engine Wheelbase23.71'23.79'23.42'20.06'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.37 0.37 0.36 0.41
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)49.35'41.40'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)038900 lbs16500 lbs
Weight on Drivers69300 lbs81025 lbs76170 lbs81050 lbs33000 lbs
Engine Weight107000 lbs119000 lbs113370 lbs127450 lbs50400 lbs
Tender Light Weight107233 lbs098233 lbs48166 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight214233 lbs211603 lbs98566 lbs
Tender Water Capacity9000 gals04000 gals5500 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)14 tons0 tons9.5 tons1784 gals gals
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)58 lb/yard68 lb/yard63 lb/yard68 lb/yard28 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter69"69"69"70"49"
Boiler Pressure160 psi180 psi160 psi175 psi115 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)18" x 26"19" x 24"17" x 26"19" x 24"14" x 18"
Tractive Effort16604 lbs19211 lbs14810 lbs18411 lbs7038 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.17 4.22 5.14 4.40 4.69
Heating Ability
Firebox Area141.70 sq. ft143.30 sq. ft141.70 sq. ft150 sq. ft83.50 sq. ft
Grate Area16.71 sq. ft26.20 sq. ft17.20 sq. ft26.90 sq. ft10.10 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1348 sq. ft1816 sq. ft1045 sq. ft2063 sq. ft708 sq. ft
Superheating Surface192 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface1348 sq. ft1816 sq. ft1237 sq. ft2063 sq. ft708 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume176.03230.58152.99261.94220.76
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation26744716275247081162
Same as above plus superheater percentage26744716319247081162
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area226722579426300262509603
Power L149416656937972923296
Power MT314.37362.21542.92396.70440.39

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassE-64Pawnee
Locobase ID7835 104
RailroadOregon Railway & Navigation (UP)Kansas Pacific (UP)
CountryUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-0
Number in Class84
Road Numbers603-609, 710/80-87/1114-112118-21
GaugeStdStd
Number Built84
BuilderRhode IslandRogers
Year18901867
Valve GearStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase 9.08' 7.75'
Engine Wheelbase24.67'23'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.37 0.34
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)46.83'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)34300 lbs
Weight on Drivers68600 lbs42000 lbs
Engine Weight109900 lbs62000 lbs
Tender Light Weight91816 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight201716 lbs
Tender Water Capacity2000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)2 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)57 lb/yard35 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter64"54"
Boiler Pressure150 psi130 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)18" x 26"16" x 22"
Tractive Effort16782 lbs11525 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.09 3.64
Heating Ability
Firebox Area122.10 sq. ft72 sq. ft
Grate Area18.50 sq. ft14.50 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1385 sq. ft980 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface1385 sq. ft980 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume180.87191.42
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation27751885
Same as above plus superheater percentage27751885
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area183159360
Power L141693062
Power MT267.96321.45

Reference


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