Kansas City, Mexico & Orient / Kansas City, Mexico, & Orient / New Mexico & Southern Pacific / Rio Grande, Mexico & Pacific / Saint Louis, Rocky Mountain & Pacific / Santa Fe / Santa Fe Pacific / Santa Fe, Prescott & Phoenix / St. Louis, Rocky Mountain, & Pacific 2-8-0 "Consolidation" Locomotives of the USA


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class 101/ 870 (Locobase 8899)

Data from AT&SF 9 -1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 28, p. 242. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema .

Works numbers were 27706- 27707 in March 1906; 27877 in April, and 28526, 28661 in July.

Remarkably, this small class of standard Consolidations enjoy a lasting reputation because the class leader was preserved. As a result, its history is well-detailed on http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfpres/atsf870.html, last accessed 18 November 2007. Despite its grand name, the StLRM&SF actually ran in northern New Mexico. Its principal raison d'etre was coal extraction along the Raton Pass. The railway was purchased by the Santa Fe in 1913 and renamed the Rocky Mountain & Santa Fe; the locomotives were renumbered beginning with 870.

In 1940, 870 and 874 (along with 769) were sold to the Albuquerque & Los Cerrillos at Madrid, NM. Ultimately 870 wound up at Heritage Park in Santa Fe Springs after a thorough cosmetic restoration.


Class 101/870 (Locobase 6140)

Data from DeGolyer, Volume 28, p. 242 and 1994 email from Richard E Scholz as archived and http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfpres/atsf870.htm (visited 13 June 2004). Works numbers were 27706-27707 in March 1906; 27877 in April; 28304 in June; 28526, 28661in July.

This Consolidation class originally operated for the grandiosely named StLRM&P, which was located entirely in northern New Mexico and chiefly served the coal fields around the Raton Pass. In the original order, the builder guaranteed that one of the locomotives would be able to pull 1,200 tons of cars and lading up a 1% straight grade.

The Santa Fe took over the line in 1913, changed its name to the more compatible Rocky Mountain and Santa Fe (RM & SF) in 1915. In 1924, the Santa Fe renumbered the quintet as 870-874.

By this time, the locomotives had been superheated and now used piston valves; see Locobase 16143.


Class 101/870 -- superheated (Locobase 16143)

Data from ATSF 6 - 1927 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Locobase 6140 shows the original design as it was built for the St Louis, Rocky Mountain & Pacific (if ever there was a "nutshell" name for a railroad ...) in 1906. The update applied to the class sometime before it was officially incorporated into the Santa Fe was modest. About half of the small tubes were sacrificed to add a medium-strength superheater to the boiler.

Four were sold in the late 1930s and 1940. In August 1940, 870 and 874 went to Albuquerque & Cerrillos Coal Company of Madrid, NM. Later, Joe Huber bought the 870 to put on display at Old Coal Mine.

871 somehow escaped the torch until January 1948.


Class 130 / 2404 (Locobase 4886)

Described in a 1906 Baldwin catalogue describing locomotives the company built for the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe. Reproduced on http://www.railroadextra.com/blatsf.hmtl . Also from AT&SF 9 -1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

nformation about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (accessed 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema. Information also supplied as "As-Built Specifications" from Blair Tarr, Kansas State Historical Society, August 2001.

Works numbers were 5254-5255, 5266-5268, 5275, 5286, 5289 in September 1880;5299-5300. in November. See also Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Volume 11, p. 39. Works numbers were 6062 in February 1882; 6083, 6104, 6106 in March.

These were described as "duplicates ...with some extras".

Following up on the success of the Uncle Dick, Burnham, Williams & Co (as Baldwin was then known) supplied these tender engines in which the saddle tank was omitted. Note that the stroke had lengthened by two inches and the drivers were bigger.

These were used for general freight service. Santa Fe's 1920 diagram shows 19" cylinders, that resulted from a rebuilding effort sometime after 1900. All were scrapped in the mid-1920s.


Class 1900 (Locobase 8279)

Data from AT&SF 9 -1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also detailed spec at DeGolyer, Vol 46, pp. 162-172. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (accessed 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema. Works numbers were 37798-37807 in June 1912; 39437-39442, 39512-39515 in March 1913.

These were the last Consolidations to be bought by the Santa Fe and they were powerful examples of a 2-8-0 design. Superheated from the outset, the class served in this form until retirement. The first locomotive was retired in 1940, the last in 1955.


Class 1950 (Locobase 4208)

Data from "New Locomotives for the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, Railroad Gazette, Volume XLIV, No. 13 (27 March 1908), pp. 453-454. See also DeGolyer, Volume 30, p. 96. Works numbers were 31958-31960, 31986-31987, 32003, 32022-32023, 32044-32046, 32079, 32088, 32096 in October 1907; 32120-32121, 32143, 32161-32162, 32181-32182, 32210-32211, 32254-32255, 32260-32262, 32278-32280 in November; 32315-32318, 32366-32368, 32422, 32429-32430, 32451 in December.

This was the largest single class of Consolidations to be built for the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe. Like many 2-8-0s of the day, the engines had a relatively long stroke. Unlike many, these had the Baldwin smokebox superheater, which didn't use flues between tubesheets but instead an assembly in the smokebox itself that was the last part of the route for steam on its way to the cylinders. In this class, the superheating area amounted to 600 sq ft, although its effect was marginal. Of the 42 locomotives, 32 burned oil, 10 coal. They had relatively generous 13" (330 mm) piston valves.

Four of the class were converted in 1911 to 2-8-8-0 Mallets and numbered 3200-3203 (1974-1976 and 1972). After operating those engines for 12 years, the Santa Fe converted them back to 2-8-0s. These were scrapped in February 1952 (1972), December 1953 (1974, 1976), and August 1954 (1975).

Most of the class was superheated; see Locobase 8280.


Class 1950 - superheated (Locobase 8280)

Data from AT&SF 9 -1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (accessed 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema.

Drury (1993) comments that the Santa Fe didn't acquire a large stud of 2-8-0s and that this class, and the 1900s purchased in 1912, "seem to be an afterthought, purchased between orders for 2-10-2s and 2-8-2s." While that may have been so, it didn't prevent the Santa Fe from modernizing the superheater. The inefficient boiler-barrel system was replaced by a Schmidt installation in the smokebox.

The first of the 1950s was retired in 1940; the last went in 1955. 2 -- 1959, 1986 -- were sold to the Apache Railway in 1935.


Class 2301 (Locobase 8260)

Data from AT&SF 7 -1901 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (accessed 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema. Works numbers were 582-586, 590-594)

These small Consolidations were among the Dunkirk,New York builder's earliest locomotives. Half had been disposed of by 1901 and the other half (2301-2302, 2304-2306) were gone by 1918.


Class 2311 (Locobase 8261)

Data from AT&SF 7 -1901 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 10, pp. 139 and 257. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (accessed 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema. Works numbers were

1881 January 5455-5456; February 5478-5479, 5495, 5497, 5523, 5525; March 5549-5550

1882 March 6103, 6105; April 6138-6139, 6148, 6151, 6167-6169; May 6172-6174, 6206-6209; June 6244-6246, 6252-6253.

In the same year that Brooks supplied some small 2-8-0s to the Santa Fe (Locobase 8261), Baldwin began delivery of a larger class of still smaller Consolidations. The two designs shared the same cylinder volume, but that was about it. The Baldwin boiler had more tubes of shorter length for less total heating surface, but a larger grate and consequently a larger firebox heating surface. Tube counts varied by one or two in different batches.

The 1902 Description shows that five engines (2315, 2324, 2335, 2338-2339) had boilers pressed to 145 psi.

This class operated until the 1920s.

See Locobase 8261 for Hinkley locomotives of very similar design.


Class 2341 (Locobase 8262)

Data from AT&SF 7 -1901 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (accessed 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema.

A year after Baldwin began delivering its small Consolidations to the Santa Fe (see Locobase 8261), Hinkley chipped in 25 identical designs that differed only in having 2 fewer firetubes in the boiler and a grate that measured 1" wider. Also, its adhesion and total engine weights measured about 2 1/2 tons more. As far as Locobase can tell from a builder's list also supplied by Allen Stanley, the last two batches (5 & 12 locomotives, respectively) had works #1406-1410 and 1421-1432. Road numbers for these two groups ran consecutively from 189-205.

Like the 2311s, this class operated into the 1920s.


Class 2366 (Locobase 8263)

Data from AT&SF 7 -1901 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (accessed 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema.

As described in Locobases 8260-8261, Santa Fe took delivery of several tens of Consolidations all built to essentially the same design by three different builders. Here's Taunton's 10-locomotive contribution. One significant difference is in the more even balance on the driving axles than either the Baldwin or Hinkley engines showed.

This class was retired a few years earlier than the other 1880s 2-8-0s, the last departing in 1916.


Class 2376 (Locobase 8281)

Data from AT&SF 7 -1901 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (accessed 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema. Works numbers were 458-467, 512-526.

Years after this class of small Consolidations entered service, they received a "New-Style Boiler". The 1920 Santa Fe diagram from which the appellation is taken shows that changes included extending the tubes by 2 feet to 12' 11" and narrowing the grate by 1 3/4" while reducing its length from 96" to 78 1/8". This reduced the grate area to 14.6 sq ft and firebox heating surface fell to 104 sq ft, while increasing total evaporative heating surface to 1,212 sq ft.

Locobase cannot say exactly when the new boilers were added (in the first years of the 20th Century, probably), but Werkema shows the last of the class being retired in 1922. (One, 2391, lost its leading truck and became an 0-8-0 switcher.)


Class 2439/2442 (Locobase 5497)

Data from http://www.railroadingonline.com/railroads/atsf/drawings.(11 April 2003).

Originally from the SFP&P's Bradshaw Mountain virtual mining railroad where they came in two batches 2439-2441 in 1904, 2442-2444 in 1906. (The later trio had 20 more sq ft/1.86 sq m of heating surface and put 4,000 more lb on the drivers.) They were small Consolidations fit in the light freight service for which they were suited.

First retirement came in 1940, the last in 1951.


Class 2504 (Locobase 822)

Turn-of-the-century example of a powerful, small-drivered freight locomotive. Drawing that supplied the data notes that these two -- 2504-2505 -- were originally Kansas City, Mexico, & Orient 21-22 (ex-NYC). Retired in 1933-34.


Class 2506 (Locobase 5493)

A sister of the Kansas City, Mexico, & Orient 21-22 shown in Locobase 822 (ex-NYC). Taken from http://www.railroadingonline.com/railroads/atsf/drawings.., this shows the class as superheated. Retired in 1933-34.


Class 2507 (Locobase 5494)

Data from http://www.railroadingonline.com/railroads/atsf/drawings..(11 April 2003) and http://www.atsfrr.com/resources/2507%20Cl/specs.pdf (25 Feb 2005).

Kansas City, Mexico, & Orient class 51-69, these ex-NYC Consolidations were quite a bit more powerful than earlier KC, M & O engines. They also had capacious 14"-diameter piston valves .It's not clear whether they were delivered with superheaters or modified later on.

Retired in 1952-55.


Class 2535 (Locobase 824)

Data from http://www.railroadingonline.net/railroads/atsf/drawings/c2535-2.gif, accessed 11 March 2007.

Elaboration of Consolidation built in Alco's Pittsburgh shops with larger drivers, smaller boiler that was pressed harder, used two thermic syphons of 59 sq ft total, and superheated the steam.. Drawing that supplied the data notes that these came from an Kansas City, Mexico, & Orient class 15 locomotives.

Retired in 1947-1954.


Class 2550 (Locobase 5495)

Data from http://www.railroadingonline.com/railroads/atsf/drawings.(11 April 2003). Kansas City, Mexico, & Orient class 251-252. These relatively small Consolidations apparently served useful purposes, for while one of the saturated steamers was retired in 1939, the other endured until 1953.


Class 2552 (Locobase 5496)

Data from http://www.railroadingonline.com/railroads/atsf/drawings.(11 April 2003). Kansas City, Mexico, & Orient class 301-302. This pair had the same power dimensions as the 2550s, but a bigger grate. Sometime later they were superheated and fitted with 39.5 sq ft of thermic syphons as part of the firebox heating surface. Although unlike most AT&SF power, the engines continued in service until 1952 (2553) and 1952 (2552).


Class 266 / 3045 / 769 (Locobase 8999)

Data from AT&SF 9 -1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (accessed 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema.

As the Santa Fe was taking delivery of several dozen 21" x 28" Consolidations, it was ordering the next biggest variant for its subsidiary. The cylinder diameter stayed the same, but the stroke lengthened to 30" and boiler pressure went up by 15 psi.

Most stayed on the Santa Fe well into the 1940s, some being converted to 0-8-0 switchers.


Class 4 / 709 / 3030 / 248 (Locobase 8998)

Data from AT&SF 9 -1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also "Consolidation Locomotives, Santa Fe Pacific Railway, " American Engineer & Railroad Journal, Volume 73 (September 1899), p.285. Information on how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (accessed 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema. Dickson's works numbers included 980-984, 1024-1028, 1045-1049, 1052-1056. 715 was fitted with a stayless Jacobs-Shupert firebox.

Scranton's major locomotive builder contributed 20 locomotives to a standard Consolidation line at the same time as Baldwin's larger order was being filled.

The design had all the hallmarks of what would become the typical drag-freight 2-8-0. The AERJ commented on the amount of cast steel in this engine: "... the principal parts made of this material being the frames, driving boxes, steam chests and covers, driving wheels, equalizers, guide yokes and guide yoke brackets, brake hangers, cross heads, rocker arms, tumbling shafts, reverse levers, pedestals, radius bars and other smaller parts." But not, apparently, the firebox?

The engines had extended piston rods and a wide-mouth stack.


Class 51/2442 (Locobase 8897)

Data from AT&SF 9 -1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema. Works numbers were 29720-29722 in June 1904 and 41123-41125 in August 1906.

The 1904 engines had the weights and wheelbases as shown. The 1906 trio (54-56) weighed almost 2 tons more on the drivers (135,100 lb) and had a bigger tender that held 5,500 gallons of water.

The sextet operated on the SFP&P's Bradshaw Mountain Railroad, which opened in 1902 on 27 miles (43.5 km) of line. In 1912, the BMRR was taken into the California, Arizona & Santa Fe, an 834-mile (1,343 km), which was leased in March 1912 by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe. At that point the locomotives were placed in their own 2442 class.


Class 621 (Locobase 8244)

Data from AT&SF 7 -1901 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema.

Small, low-drivered drag-freight Consolidations from Richmond. Like the Baldwins of the same year (Locobase 8995), 4 of this class was sold to the Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe subsidiary in 1898, only to return when the GC & SF was folded into the parent organization. 622 went to the Madero Box & Lumber Company for the Mexico Northwestern Railway in April 1916.

The others remained in Santa Fe colors until their retirements. The last of these left service in 1932.


Class 640 (Locobase 8245)

Data from AT&SF 7 -1901 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema.

Typical Turn-of-the-Century Consolidation class, except that the first 8 were converted by the Santa Fe from 1870s Eight-wheelers. Locobase has to wonder what might have been left of the original locomotives. For the record, the makeovers were applied to

New number Original number Name Original builder Year built Retired

640 #75 Thomas Dana Hinkley 1879 1930

641 #50 Hercules Hinkley 1876 1950

642 #52 Canon City Baldwin 1872 1936

643 #73 H C Hardon Hinkley 1879 1953

649 #71 Warren Sawyer Taunton 1877 1932

650 #72 Caleb Foote Taunton 1877 1930

651 #39 Lawrence Baldwin 1874 1936

652 #200 Hinkley 1881 1935

Of the 11 that were built new by the shops in 1898 to the same design, the last of these was retired in 1947. Note that two of the rebuilds lasted into the 1950s.


Class 644 (Locobase 8248)

Data from AT&SF 7 -1901 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema.

These John Player tandem compounds were built in the Santa Fe shops. As described in Locobase 2972 (some Player 4-6-0s), this arrangement differed slightly from Vauclain's similar design. The design must have proved quite unsatisfactory, for they were uncompounded very rapidly and soon rebuilt as 0-8-0 switchers.


Class 664 (Locobase 3149)

Described in a 1906 Baldwin catalogue describing locomotives the company built for the railroad and reproduced on http://catskillarchive.com/rrextra/blatsf.Html . See also DeGolyer, Volume 22, p. 10 and AT&SF 9 - 1920 locomotive diagram supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works numbers were 16320-16329, 16335-16349 in November 1898; 17187-17188 in October 1899; 17228-17231 in November; 17258-17261 in December. 16941-16943 began their service careers as 3100-3102 and wound up on the San Francisco & San Joaquin Valley.

1890s Consolidation of relatively modest dimensions. These were the first Baldwins to be produced with cast steel frames. The Baldwin account notes that the Santa Fe's Superintendent of Motive Power, John Player, had been using these on the railroad and specified them in the contract. The Baldwin specs on page 10 of Volume 22 show 233 tubes and 165 sq ft of firebox heating surface area, but the total figure of 1905 sq ft of evaporative heating surface area belongs to the earlier engines in the class. Locobase accepts the 165 sq ft as including 22 sq ft (2.04 sq m) of arch tubes.

Locobase 16144 shows the superheated class as modified by the Santa Fe.


Class 664 - superheated (Locobase 16144)

Data from AT&SF 6 - 1927 locomotive diagram supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Locobase 3149 describes the original 1898 Consolidation design that included the larger cylinder volume that first appeared in a set of Santa Fe-built engines a few years earlier.

As with most conversions to a superheated boiler, the exchange of 109 small tubes for 21 flues for the superheater elements added up to a smaller combined evaporative heating surface. But the hotter, drier steam supplied perceptibly more power for a relatively small weight gain.

Even so, growing train length and weight much larger and faster freight locomotives and this class was retired during the 1930s. A few went to other operators. 707 crossed the border in September 1936 to operate on the Mexico Northwestern. 670 was sold in October 1936 to Southern Asphalt Company, 690 joined Fort Worth Sand & Gravel Company in May 1937 as their 7. Prestridge & Seligman Lumber Company of Grants, NM bought the 678 in October 1940.

A few ran through World War Two. 672 was scrapped in July 1947, 660 was scrapped in May 1950, 684 in April 1952, and December 1953. The class leader 664 was donated to the City of Los Angeles in May 1953 and went on display for Travel Town in the city's Griffith Park


Class 759 (Locobase 8254)

Data from AT&SF 7 -1901 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema.

This class of Consolidations was the more powerful, but lighter, half of a 60-engine set. Locobase is intrigued by the difference a builder could make in such matters. Was the Richmond factory's boiler steel of better quality? Can't say. But like the Baldwins, these Richmonds gave long service, the last retiring in 1955.


Class 789 (Locobase 4890)

Vauclain compound Consolidations built by Baldwin for the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe and described in a 1906 Baldwin catalogue which is reproduced on http://www.railroadextra.com/blatsf.hmtl . See also DeGolyer, Volume 24, p. 108. Data supplemented by AT&SF 7 -1901 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema.

Works numbers were:

1901

November 19754

December 19815-19823, 19858, 19867, 19874-19875, 19889-19891, 19948-19953

1902

January 19967-19968, 19972-19975, 19996-19998, 20011-20013

These Vauclain compounds had relatively small 13" (331 mm) diameter piston valves to feed the two cylinders on each side. They were simpled before long (1907-1910) -- see Locobase 9000.


Class 789 - simpled (Locobase 9000)

Data from AT&SF 9 -1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (accessed 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema.

The Santa Fe went for Vauclain Compound locomotives in a big way (even as Samuel Vauclain himself was pronouncing in favor of simple and superheat). It wasn't long, however, before the class described in Locobase 4890 had given up its LP cylinders and adopted some hefty simple-expansion cans instead. A few were fitted with the stayless Jacobs-Shupert firebox, which is more fully described in Locobase 463.

The class carried on until the late 1930s when the first of them was retired. Three were converted to 0-8-0 switchers.


Class 824 (Locobase 5371)

Data from "Heavy Consolidation Compound Locomotive,"American Engineer & Railroad Journal, (January 1902), pp. 10-14. See also DeGolyer, Volume 24, p. 109. Works number was November 1902.

This Vauclain compound is notable for the large number of tubes it had stuffed in its boiler and their relatively small diameter and length; both were characteristic of the Vanderbilt boiler (see Locobase 4104 for more). This variant was still more unusual, however, in that the firebox was subdivided into three separate corrugated furnaces. Each of the fireboxes measured 32" in diameter and 86" long connected to the rear plate of the combustion chamber and the back head. Just inside the back plate of each of these flues was a trapezoidal firebrick structure described as an "obstruction to the flame". The combustion chamber supplied a critical 70 sq ft to the firebox heating surface area.

Another weird feature, shown in the AT&SF 7 -1902 Locomotive Description supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection, is the grate area, which is expressed as "3 flues 3 1/2" x 7'" and appears to refer to the oil burner's nozzle layout.

After being simpled within a decade of its introduction, the lone 824 was converted to an 0-8-0 switcher in 1937.


Class 825 (Locobase 5334)

Data from table in AERJ July 1903. Alco's Rhode Island and Pittsburgh works shared in the construction of these Vauclain compounds.

These were simpled and superheated in 1919-1922; see Locobase 9001.


Class 825 - simpled & superheated (Locobase 9001)

Data from AT&SF 9 -1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (accessed 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema.

Unlike the earlier Vauclain Compound Consolidations, this class remained a 2-level design unitl the end of the Great War. At that time the value of simpling and superheating was well established and the Topeka shops overhauled this class. Unlike some of the other makeovers, however, this class had its boiler pressure dropped as it gained superheat.

Most were converted to 0-8-0 switchers over a 15-year span in 1922-1937.


Class 851 / 729 (Locobase 8253)

Data from AT&SF 7 -1901 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 22, p. 300. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema. Works numbers were 17489-17492 in February 1900; and 17531-17538, 17570-17573, 17584-17585, 17604-17607, and 17616-17620 in March.

This batch of Consolidations formed half of a larger class. For some reason, these Baldwins were pressed to 180 psi while the Richmond half (Locobase 8254) went to 200 psi. Moreover, the Baldwins put almost five tons more on the drivers. The Baldwin specs showed the firebox heating surface area as 170.5 sq ft (15.84 sq m) and an evaporative heating surface area of 2,174.3 sq ft (202 sq m). The later difference may represent a new firebox or some added area in arch tubes.

But whatever the setting and the weight, the design obviously satisfied the railroad, which operated about several into the 1940s. Fourteen--729-732, 736-739, 869, 871-872, 874-875, 879--were converted to 0-8-0 switchers, given salvaged superheated boilers from the 507 and 1400 classes, and fitted with 22" cylinders. 756 in April 1940, 755 in June were sold to the Mexican Northwestern.

748 was scrapped in October 1932, 754 followed in June 1934, . After World War Two, 745 was sold for scrap in August 1947, 741 went in December, and 742 completed the class retirements in January 1948.


Class 901 / 916 / 616 (Locobase 8995)

Data from AT&SF 7 -1901 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 19, p.69. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema. Works numbers were 13916-13920.

Like the Richmond locomotives produced in the same year and described in Locobase 8244, these were small Consolidations. The grate was considerably smaller. Note that the Baldwins had fewer, but larger-diameter boiler tubes to make up very nearly the same heating surface area as the Richmonds.

The Santa Fe originally took delivery of this batch, which was produced in January 1894. In 1898, the AT & SF sold the class to the Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe, which later handed them back to the Santa Fe with different engine numbers. They were scrapped in the late 1920s.


Class 990 (Locobase 8255)

Data from AT&SF 7 -1901 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema.

At the same time the AT & SF was buying the sixty 21 x 30" Consolidations shown on Locobase 8253-8254, the shops were turning out these bigger, long-stroke engines in their own shops for service on such grades as the challenging Raton Pass in Arizona.

The first two sat heavier on the rails, putting 172,900 lb on the drivers and 195,400 lb as total engine weight. Frank Ellington anthologized a "snippet" published the Topeka State Journal on 13 February 1901, when the 991 went on the line (http://atsf.railfan.net/snippets/locomotives.html, last accessed 11 June 2007):

"It is one of two of the largest engines to go into service on the whole Santa Fe system. Its boiler is made up of 7/8" boiler steel, and in diameter is six feet, affording more than room for an ordinary man to stand straight inside it. The firebox is eleven feet from door to flues, giving the fireman ample opportunity to test his muscles in keeping the fire properly distributed over it. The engine will carry 200 pounds pressure, a figure greater than that of nearly all the engines on the Santa Fe.

About the power of it there can hardly be made any conceivable estimate. On a level pull it will move as many cars as can stand the strain on the connections. The 990, an exact duplicate of 991, pulled 125 cars, loads and emptys, (sic) and there is no doubt that one engine can do what the other can do."

Like most of the Santa Fe's 2-8-0s, these sturdy freight haulers served well into the late 1940s.


Class Uncle Dick (Locobase 4885)

Described in a 1906 Baldwin catalogue describing locomotives the company built for the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe. Reproduced on http://www.railroadextra.com/blatsf.hmtl . See also DeGolyer, Volume 9, p. 42; and American v English Locomotives, Correspondence, Criticism, and Commentary respecting Their Relative Merits (New York: Robert K Pease, 1880), pp. 36-37.

This unusual saddle-tank Consolidation (works number 4500) was used in helper service on the Raton Pass, which at the time was crossed by a switchback 2 3/4 miles long and featuring grades of up to 6%! The curves must have been pretty tight, because the first and third drivers on each side were left blind ("plain") which reduced a driving wheelbase from 14 3/4 ft to a rigid wheelbase of 9 feet.

Baldwin claimed that the locomotive "did efficient work, hauling on average seven cars weighing, loaded, 43,000 pounds each, over the 6% grade; the tender weighing about 44,000 pounds additional." (This tender was trailed by the Uncle Dick to extend the saddle-tanker's range.) A letter from several senior officials of the Santa Fe indicated that on a 3% grade, the Uncle Dick managed 230 tons (209 metric tons) at 8 mph (12.9 km/h). At first, however, the Uncle Dick repeatedly derailed on the switchback track as engineers learned to operate a locomotive that possessed twice the pulling power of the 4-4-0s it replaced.

Even after the tunnel was completed at the end of 1878, the Uncle Dick provided helper service until 1900. Over time the engine's saddle tank was removed, which displayed the unusual tapered steam dome with "coolie-hat" top and sand dome more prominently. Renumbered 2403, the locomotive remained in service until scrapped in 1921.

The engine's name honors Richens Lacy "Uncle Dick" Wootton, a mountain man turned toll-road operator who in 1865 opened a 27-mile toll road from Trinidad, NM over the Raton Pass to Willow Springs. He had a good eye for terrain and the Santa Fe sought to buy him out in 1878 with an offer of $50,000. As much to poke a finger in the eye of the Denver & Rio Grande as for any more noble purpose, Wootton asked instead that the railroad give his wife (his 4th and 40 years younger) a free pass for life and groceries. He and the Santa Fe sealed the agreement with a handshake.

Maria Paula Lujan, a cousin of his first wife Dolores, had married Wootton in 1867 when she was 13 and would eventually bear him 10 children. According to Alta Ann West (www.coloradohistory.org/kids/wootton.pdf, accessed 21 March 2008),"True to their word, the Santa Fe Railroad officials took good care of her. They made sure she had groceries and a free ride on the train whenever she wanted until her death."

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class101/ 870101/870101/870 -- superheated130 / 24041900
Locobase ID8899 6140 16143 4886 8279
RailroadSt. Louis, Rocky Mountain, & Pacific (ATSF)Saint Louis, Rocky Mountain & Pacific (ATSF)Saint Louis, Rocky Mountain & Pacific (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class5551420
Road Numbers501-505/865-869101-105/870-874870-874130-139, 279-282 / 2404-24171900-1919
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built5520
BuilderBurnham, Williams & CoBaldwinSanta FeBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoBaldwin
Year1906190518801912
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase15.33'15.33'15.33'14.75'15.50'
Engine Wheelbase23.42'23.42'23.42'22.83'24.50'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.65 0.65 0.65 0.65 0.63
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)54.71'54.71'54.71'47.69'58.58'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)54200 lbs
Weight on Drivers163150 lbs163150 lbs163150 lbs96000 lbs195500 lbs
Engine Weight180800 lbs180800 lbs180800 lbs110000 lbs226300 lbs
Tender Light Weight136000 lbs136000 lbs136000 lbs90000 lbs196000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight316800 lbs316800 lbs316800 lbs200000 lbs422300 lbs
Tender Water Capacity7000 gals7000 gals7000 gals3200 gals8500 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)12 tons12 tons12 tons6 tons3300 gals
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)68 lb/yard68 lb/yard68 lb/yard40 lb/yard81 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter57"57"57"50"57"
Boiler Pressure200 psi200 psi200 psi140 psi200 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)21" x 30"21" x 30"21" x 30"20" x 28"23.5" x 32"
Tractive Effort39458 lbs39458 lbs39458 lbs26656 lbs52706 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.13 4.13 4.13 3.60 3.71
Heating Ability
Firebox Area171 sq. ft159 sq. ft171 sq. ft155 sq. ft176 sq. ft
Grate Area30 sq. ft30 sq. ft30 sq. ft27.40 sq. ft47.40 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface2190 sq. ft2178 sq. ft1725 sq. ft1381 sq. ft2844 sq. ft
Superheating Surface350 sq. ft581 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface2190 sq. ft2178 sq. ft2075 sq. ft1381 sq. ft3425 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume182.10181.10143.43135.64177.04
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation60006000600038369480
Same as above plus superheater percentage600060007020383611092
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area3420031800400142170041184
Power L1481146979053247110589
Power MT260.04253.88489.33226.98477.64

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class19501950 - superheated230123112341
Locobase ID4208 8280 8260 8261 8262
RailroadSanta Fe (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)Rio Grande, Mexico & Pacific (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class424263125
Road Numbers1950-19911950-1991283-288 / 2305-2310283-310, 326-328 / 2311-23402341-2365
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built4263125
BuilderBurnham, Williams & CoATSFBrooksBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoHinkley
Year19071920188118811882
Valve GearWalschaertWalschaertStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase15.50'15.50'13.33'14.42'14.42'
Engine Wheelbase24.50'24.50'21.33'22.50'22.50'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.63 0.63 0.62 0.64 0.64
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)58.25'58.46'46.50'43.75'44.08'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)48300 lbs24000 lbs20650 lbs23300 lbs
Weight on Drivers183200 lbs184100 lbs78000 lbs69200 lbs74600 lbs
Engine Weight212400 lbs211458 lbs87000 lbs83850 lbs89600 lbs
Tender Light Weight162600 lbs179000 lbs68700 lbs68200 lbs64000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight375000 lbs390458 lbs155700 lbs152050 lbs153600 lbs
Tender Water Capacity8500 gals8500 gals2300 gals3275 gals2425 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)3300 gals3300 gals7.3 tons7 tons6.5 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)76 lb/yard77 lb/yard33 lb/yard29 lb/yard31 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter57"57"45"48"48"
Boiler Pressure160 psi180 psi140 psi130 psi130 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)24" x 32"24" x 32"17" x 26"17" x 26"17" x 26"
Tractive Effort43978 lbs49475 lbs19870 lbs17298 lbs17298 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.17 3.72 3.93 4.00 4.31
Heating Ability
Firebox Area181 sq. ft181 sq. ft106 sq. ft111 sq. ft111 sq. ft
Grate Area47.40 sq. ft47.40 sq. ft21 sq. ft22.20 sq. ft22.80 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface2930 sq. ft2687 sq. ft1120 sq. ft996 sq. ft986 sq. ft
Superheating Surface581 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface2930 sq. ft3268 sq. ft1120 sq. ft996 sq. ft986 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume174.87160.37163.97145.82144.35
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation75848532294028862964
Same as above plus superheater percentage758410068294028862964
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area2896038444148401443014430
Power L134799003253623622346
Power MT167.46431.25286.71301.00277.32

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class236623762439/244225042506
Locobase ID8263 8281 5497 822 5493
RailroadSanta Fe (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)Kansas City, Mexico, & Orient (ATSF)Kansas City, Mexico, & Orient (ATSF)Kansas City, Mexico & Orient (ATSF)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class1025621
Road Numbers2366-2375154-178 / 2376-24002439-24442504-25052506
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built1025621
BuilderTauntonPittsburghAlco-BrooksAlco-SchenectadyAlco-Schenectady
Year18821881190419031903
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase14.42'15.33'13.50'15'15'
Engine Wheelbase22.42'23.33'21.75'23.59'23.58'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.64 0.66 0.62 0.64 0.64
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)43.75'46.92'50.67'62.17'62.17'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)20400 lbs26300 lbs
Weight on Drivers75400 lbs85200 lbs131200 lbs194000 lbs196300 lbs
Engine Weight89400 lbs94200 lbs147200 lbs218000 lbs226700 lbs
Tender Light Weight67000 lbs64100 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight156400 lbs158300 lbs
Tender Water Capacity3100 gals4100 gals5500 gals8000 gals8000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)6 tons6.5 tons2500 gals3657 gals3657 gals
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)31 lb/yard36 lb/yard55 lb/yard81 lb/yard82 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter48"53"50"51"51"
Boiler Pressure130 psi140 psi180 psi180 psi200 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)17" x 26"17" x 26"19" x 26"23" x 30"23" x 30"
Tractive Effort17298 lbs16871 lbs28721 lbs47610 lbs52900 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.36 5.05 4.57 4.07 3.71
Heating Ability
Firebox Area111 sq. ft118.50 sq. ft149 sq. ft215 sq. ft215 sq. ft
Grate Area22 sq. ft18.70 sq. ft24 sq. ft58 sq. ft58.80 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface987 sq. ft1049 sq. ft1847 sq. ft4130 sq. ft2891 sq. ft
Superheating Surface918 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface987 sq. ft1049 sq. ft1847 sq. ft4130 sq. ft3809 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume144.50153.58216.48286.28200.40
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation2860261843201044011760
Same as above plus superheater percentage2860261843201044014582
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area1443016590268203870053320
Power L1234829724557552014410
Power MT274.61307.61306.29250.92647.35

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class2507253525502552266 / 3045 / 769
Locobase ID5494 824 5495 5496 8999
RailroadKansas City, Mexico, & Orient (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)Kansas City, Mexico, & Orient (ATSF)Kansas City, Mexico, & Orient (ATSF)Santa Fe Pacific (ATSF)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class19152220
Road Numbers2507-25252535-25492550-25512552-2553266-285 / 3045-64 /769-88
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built19152220
BuilderAlco-SchenectadyAlco-PittsburghAlco-CookeAlco-CookeRichmond
Year19061909190619051900
Valve GearWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase17.50'15'16'16'15.33'
Engine Wheelbase24'24'24.67'24.75'23.42'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.73 0.62 0.65 0.65 0.65
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)61.60'61.60'61.87'61.87'52.65'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)47000 lbs
Weight on Drivers215500 lbs197000 lbs184000 lbs196000 lbs161650 lbs
Engine Weight244500 lbs223000 lbs206000 lbs222000 lbs179300 lbs
Tender Light Weight120100 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight299400 lbs
Tender Water Capacity8000 gals8000 gals8000 gals8000 gals6000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)3657 gals3657 gals3657 gals3657 gals12.5 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)90 lb/yard82 lb/yard77 lb/yard82 lb/yard67 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter63"55"57"57"57"
Boiler Pressure200 psi205 psi200 psi200 psi195 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)23" x 32"23" x 30"22" x 30"22" x 30"21" x 30"
Tractive Effort45679 lbs50279 lbs43305 lbs43305 lbs38471 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.72 3.92 4.25 4.53 4.20
Heating Ability
Firebox Area212 sq. ft310 sq. ft180 sq. ft252 sq. ft143 sq. ft
Grate Area57.60 sq. ft53.20 sq. ft33.40 sq. ft52.34 sq. ft29 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface2962 sq. ft2616 sq. ft2550 sq. ft2616 sq. ft1790 sq. ft
Superheating Surface566 sq. ft607 sq. ft607 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface3528 sq. ft3223 sq. ft2550 sq. ft3223 sq. ft1790 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume192.49181.34193.20198.20148.84
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation11520109066680104685655
Same as above plus superheater percentage13363129786680124575655
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area4918475625360005997627885
Power L112441125434966134433859
Power MT509.10561.47238.00604.83210.52

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class4 / 709 / 3030 / 24851/2442621640644
Locobase ID8998 8897 8244 8245 8248
RailroadSanta Fe (ATSF)Santa Fe, Prescott & Phoenix (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class20610195
Road Numbers4-13 / 3030-3039 /719-72851-53, 54-56/2442-2457621-630649-663644-648
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built20610115
BuilderDicksonAlco-BrooksRichmondSanta FeSanta Fe
Year18981904189418971889
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase15.17'13.50'15.08'15.17'15.17'
Engine Wheelbase23.25'21.75'23.17'23.25'23.79'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.65 0.62 0.65 0.65 0.64
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)50.65'50.67'49.36'50.62'51.17'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)39000 lbs36400 lbs39000 lbs42800 lbs
Weight on Drivers144500 lbs131200 lbs129500 lbs144500 lbs151500 lbs
Engine Weight161500 lbs147200 lbs146000 lbs161500 lbs174000 lbs
Tender Light Weight98000 lbs111500 lbs90000 lbs90000 lbs90000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight259500 lbs258700 lbs236000 lbs251500 lbs264000 lbs
Tender Water Capacity5000 gals5000 gals5000 gals5000 gals5000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)9 tons2500 gals6 tons6 tons6 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)60 lb/yard55 lb/yard54 lb/yard60 lb/yard63 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter57"50"57"57"57"
Boiler Pressure180 psi180 psi180 psi180 psi180 psi
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke)21" x 28"19" x 26"20" x 26"21" x 28"15" x 28"
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke)25" x 28" (2)
Tractive Effort33145 lbs28721 lbs27916 lbs33145 lbs24868 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.36 4.57 4.64 4.36 6.09
Heating Ability
Firebox Area143 sq. ft149 sq. ft159 sq. ft165 sq. ft165 sq. ft
Grate Area29 sq. ft24 sq. ft29.20 sq. ft29 sq. ft29 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1790 sq. ft1867 sq. ft1779 sq. ft1905 sq. ft1905 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface1790 sq. ft1867 sq. ft1779 sq. ft1905 sq. ft1905 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume159.47218.82188.18169.72332.64
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation52204320525652205220
Same as above plus superheater percentage52204320525652205220
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area2574026820286202970029700
Power L138164592465641592935
Power MT232.88308.65317.06253.81170.84

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class664664 - superheated759789789 - simpled
Locobase ID3149 16144 8254 4890 9000
RailroadSanta Fe (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class4545303535
Road Numbers891-900, 936-960 / 664-702664-706759-788789-823789-823
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built4530
BuilderBurnham, Williams & CoSanta FeRichmondBurnham, Williams & CoSanta Fe
Year18981920190019011912
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase15.17'15.17'15.33'15.33'15.33'
Engine Wheelbase23.25'23.25'23.42'24.50'24.50'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.65 0.65 0.65 0.63 0.63
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)50.62'50.62'52.75'54.20'54.08'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)39000 lbs39000 lbs47190 lbs52500 lbs
Weight on Drivers139530 lbs144500 lbs154880 lbs180440 lbs179965 lbs
Engine Weight156130 lbs161500 lbs173080 lbs202360 lbs230115 lbs
Tender Light Weight98600 lbs98600 lbs105000 lbs117390 lbs117800 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight254730 lbs260100 lbs278080 lbs319750 lbs347915 lbs
Tender Water Capacity5000 gals5000 gals6000 gals6000 gals6000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)9 tons9 tons8.5 tons tons12 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)58 lb/yard60 lb/yard65 lb/yard75 lb/yard75 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter57"57"57"57"57"
Boiler Pressure180 psi180 psi200 psi210 psi180 psi
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke)21" x 28"21" x 28"21" x 30"17" x 32"24" x 32"
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke)28" x 32" (2)
Tractive Effort33145 lbs33145 lbs39458 lbs42321 lbs49475 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.21 4.36 3.93 4.26 3.64
Heating Ability
Firebox Area165 sq. ft156 sq. ft183 sq. ft157.30 sq. ft178.20 sq. ft
Grate Area29.23 sq. ft29 sq. ft30 sq. ft47.40 sq. ft47.20 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1852 sq. ft1441 sq. ft2190 sq. ft2930 sq. ft2950 sq. ft
Superheating Surface308 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface1852 sq. ft1749 sq. ft2190 sq. ft2930 sq. ft2950 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume164.99128.38182.10348.53176.07
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation52615220600099548496
Same as above plus superheater percentage52616160600099548496
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area2970033134366003303332076
Power L140787607490532513920
Power MT257.73464.24279.28158.88192.08

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class824825825 - simpled & superheated851 / 729901 / 916 / 616
Locobase ID5371 5334 9001 8253 8995
RailroadSanta Fe (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class14040305
Road Numbers824825-864825-864851-890 / 729-758901-905 / 916-20 / 616-20
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built140305
BuilderBurnham, Williams & CoSlaughter & GrunningSanta FeBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & Co
Year19021902191919001894
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase15.33'15.33'15.33'15.33'15.08'
Engine Wheelbase24.50'24.08'24.08'23.42'22.58'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.63 0.64 0.64 0.65 0.67
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)54.23'53.81'52.75'49.33'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)47700 lbs47400 lbs47750 lbs42250 lbs
Weight on Drivers191400 lbs176000 lbs186727 lbs163150 lbs136200 lbs
Engine Weight214600 lbs201000 lbs211605 lbs180800 lbs149500 lbs
Tender Light Weight110000 lbs117400 lbs105000 lbs70000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight324600 lbs318400 lbs285800 lbs219500 lbs
Tender Water Capacity6000 gals6000 gals8000 gals6000 gals4200 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)2200 gals10.5 tons2062 gals8.5 tons6 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)80 lb/yard73 lb/yard78 lb/yard68 lb/yard57 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter57"57"57"57"57"
Boiler Pressure210 psi210 psi170 psi180 psi180 psi
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke)17" x 32"18" x 32"23" x 32"21" x 30"20" x 26"
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke)28" x 32" (2)28" x 32" (2)
Tractive Effort42321 lbs45948 lbs42914 lbs35512 lbs27916 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.52 3.83 4.35 4.59 4.88
Heating Ability
Firebox Area235 sq. ft178 sq. ft218 sq. ft183 sq. ft165 sq. ft
Grate Area50 sq. ft48 sq. ft30 sq. ft23.50 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface4266 sq. ft2965 sq. ft2261 sq. ft2190 sq. ft1752 sq. ft
Superheating Surface510 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface4266 sq. ft2965 sq. ft2771 sq. ft2190 sq. ft1752 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume507.45314.60146.93182.10185.32
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation010500816054004230
Same as above plus superheater percentage010500962954004230
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area4935037380437313294029700
Power L147603372833444154661
Power MT219.31168.95393.59238.64301.78

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class990Uncle Dick
Locobase ID8255 4885
RailroadSanta Fe (ATSF)New Mexico & Southern Pacific (ATSF)
CountryUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-0ST
Number in Class101
Road Numbers990-999204 / 2403
GaugeStdStd
Number Built10
BuilderSanta FeBurnham, Parry, Williams & Co
Year19001878
Valve GearStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase15.33'14.75'
Engine Wheelbase24'22.83'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.64 0.65
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)53.83'22.83'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)48100 lbs
Weight on Drivers166400 lbs100000 lbs
Engine Weight185000 lbs115000 lbs
Tender Light Weight115000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight300000 lbs115000 lbs
Tender Water Capacity6000 gals2500 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)10 tons tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)69 lb/yard42 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter57"42"
Boiler Pressure200 psi130 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)21" x 32"20" x 26"
Tractive Effort42088 lbs27362 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.95 3.65
Heating Ability
Firebox Area224 sq. ft153 sq. ft
Grate Area35 sq. ft27.40 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface2699 sq. ft1376 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface2699 sq. ft1376 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume210.40145.55
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation70003562
Same as above plus superheater percentage70003562
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area4480019890
Power L156562061
Power MT299.74181.75

Photos

Reference


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