Arizona & New Mexico / El Paso & Northeastern / El Paso & Southwestern / Florence & Cripple Creek / Lordsburg & Hachita / Nevada-California-Oregon / San Antonio & Aransas Pass / San Diego & Arizona / Southern Pacific / Texas & New Orleans 2-8-0 "Consolidation" Locomotives of the USA


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class 1 / C-18 (Locobase 7700)

Data from CC&CS 1912 Locomotive DiagramRaildata collection supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Volume 19, p. 181 and Volume 20, pp. 116 and 265. Works numbers were 14185-14186 in December 1894; 14352, 14353 in July 1895; 14513-14514 in October; 14768-14771 in March 1896; and 15246-15247 in March 1897.

The F & CC was founded in 1894 to link the Arkansas Valley and the gold-mining camps farther up into the mountains. To support this trade, the railroad bought 12 small Consolidations built to the same design over a 3-year period. All had names: Victor, Cripple Creek, Elkton, Anaconda, Florence, H A Sumner, W S Stratton, Goldfield, Alta Vista, Independence, Strong, and Gold Coin.

As he drafted the last set of specs in 1895, the Baldwin representative noted the challenging profile of the area of operations: "Road 40 miles long, 23 miles of heavy 4% grades and reverse curves of 30 degrees on this grade. [T]wo grades said to be 32 degrees."

Referring to slightly smaller Consolidations with a 6" longer wheelbase that were apparently tried out on this road: "10-24 1/2 E's with 11' 4" wheelbase pass over the road all right taking 3 cars, but the flanges cut sharp in about three months."

The Cripple Creek was a busy line as long as the gold held out, but the railroad's independent life didn't survive the gold bust and its fate was sealed by a flood in 1912. In the mid-teens, the Cripple Creek & Colorado Springs acquired the F & CC trackage.

#12 of this class was soon sold to Utah's Uintah Railway, which retained the road number. Although it was sold by the Uintah in 1937, it somehow evaded scrapping long enough to be set aside for restoration. As of the 21st Century, the 12 was displayed by the Nevada Southern Railway at Boulder City, NV.

Five others were taken up by the Denver & Rio Grande Western's Narrow-Gauge division as their class C-18.

According to the D & RGW on-line data site -- http://www.drgw.org/data/steam/history/fcc9.htm --

Builder's numbers were as follows:

14352 12 425 315

15246 426 316

14513 427 317

14769 428 318

14770 429 319

14768 424 320

315 (the former #3 Elkton) and 318 (formerly #8 Goldfield) were being restored in the 21st Century.


Class 101 / C-31 (Locobase 7272)

Data from the SD&A 5 - 1921 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See Locobase 7271 for a summary of Richard V. Dodge's account of the construction of the SD & A. Works numbers were 54664-54665 in December 1914.

As the railroad proceeded eastward and actually began revenue service, the line bought these two Harriman Common Standard Consolidations .

Through the decades, the little Consolidations served the SD & A, only being withdrawn in 1953.


Class 101 / C-31s (Locobase 7280)

Data from the SD&AE 11 - 1943 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Years after the SD & A bought the 2 Harriman Common Standard Consolidations shown in Locobase 7272, the Espee superheated them. While some programs to superheat locomotives led to piston valves, thermic syphons, larger pistons or other changes, others, like the one that modified this pair, were less ambitious. In fact, other than replacing 166 2" tubes with 36 5 3/8" flues and stuffing the Type A elements in the flues, very little else was done. Still, it was a tidy makeover that allowed a slightly higher boiler pressure and enhanced power from drier steam.

Through the decades, the little Consolidations served the SD & A, only being withdrawn in 1953.


Class 14 / C-40 (Locobase 14249)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 51, p. 330. See also the Nevada County Museum at http://www.ncngrrmuseum.org/pb/wp_f6df8ec3.html . Works number was 41300 in April 1914.

Adding a fourth axle to a boiler very similar to that of the Ten-wheelers shown in Locobase 8699 permitted a nine-ton increase in adhesive weight with very little increase in weight per linear foot. In other words, the slim-rail NCO probably didn't need to substantially upgrade its right of way.

In the late 1920s, however, the NCO was converted to standard-gauge running as part of the Southern Pacific and the 14, like the other skinny-gauge engines, found new employment elsewhere. For 10 years, the head-of-the-line number #1 ran on the Keeler Branch south of Reno, Nev.

Locobase suspects that the "C-40" shown in the SP Menke All Time Steam Locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection is the same engine. Only the length of the boiler tubes is different, with the C-40 credited with 11 foot 8 inch (3.6 metre) tubes that increase evaporative heating surface area to 1,242 ft (115.43 sq m) even as the firebox's grate area and heating surface area shrank by 0.4 sq ft and 16 sq ft, respectively.

The Nevada County Narrow Gauge Railroad bought the 1 on 31 December 1933 as their #9. The "Never Come, Never Go" by this time had served the gold fields of California's western Nevada County on a 22 1/2 mile line that ran from Nevada City to Grass Valley to the junction with the SP at Colfax. The museum site speaks proudly of this short, narrow line's considerable accomplishments: "During sixty-six years of colorful operation, it hauled out more than two hundred million dollars ($200,000,000) worth of gold while bringing in mining machinery, lumber, petroleum products and all of the essentials necessary to maintain the thriving county. Thousands rode its first class passenger trains, mixed trains, and the occasional special excursions.".

In addition to boasting the highest bridge in California at one time, the NCNG could lay claim to having been "the first railroad in the U.S. to have a woman president (Sarah Kidder, 1901-1913)."

When World War II came to the US, the NCNGRR's gold traffic stopped and the 14 went into the service and was shipped to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii where it was rebuilt as 0-8-0 switcher L-17 and served another four years until it was scrapped in 1946.


Class 21 (Locobase 12663)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Volume 25, p.233. Works numbers were 21786, 21792 in March and 22283 in June.

Not fitting the mold of the large stud of Harriman Common Standard Consolidations, this trio went a different way. The EP & SW sold 2 to the Nacozari Railroad, the 214 in November 1913, the 215 almost four years later in July 1917. They were renumbered 55-56. 55 was scrapped in 1930, 56 in 1934.

216 was renumbered 55 in 1920, when the front axle was removed as part of the engine's conversion to switching duties.


Class 240 / C-24 (Locobase 7251)

Data from the SA&AP 6 - 1917 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. (See Locobase 7235 for a description of this SouthEast Texas railroad.) Lima works numbers were 1279-1288 in 1913.

This set of small Consolidations were delivered as saturated-steam engines with a relatively light axle loading. The dimensions suggest local freight work on branch lines.

Some time after the SA & AP took delivery, they superheated these engines; see Locobase 8679.


Class 50 / C-30 (Locobase 7271)

Data from the SD&A 5 - 1921 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works number for this solo delivery was 35953 in January 1911.

Richard V. Dodge wrote an entertaining account of this railroad's turbulent life -- "Impossible Railroad" -- in the DISPATCHER (#6, June 29, 1956), a publication of the Railway Historical Society of San Diego. It has been reproduced on the San Diego Railroad Museum's website -- http://www.sdrm.org/history/sda/history.html, accessed 7 December 2005. This account is among the best railway sagas available. See below for a summary.

The oil-burning locomotive in this entry was the second bought by the SD & A. It was delivered in February 1911, the same month that the railroad reached Valle Redondo, about 36 miles east of San Diego.

Dodge describes this ambitious effort to link San Diego with Yuma as a triumph over a series of calamities that assailed the project from the December 14, 1906 announcement that John D. Spreckels would undertake it. The "calamities" included financial panics, the death of E.H Harriman, the railroad mogul whose support meant financial subsidy and a subsequent suit by the Espee to recover $3 million; revolutions in Mexico; World War I; floods; and the impossible task of putting track through Carriso Gorge some 83 rail miles east of San Diego.

Carriso Gorge's topography posed nearly insuperable problems. 17 tunnels in 11 miles, 14 "side-hill trestles", each of which rested the outer rail on a set of wooden props jutting out from a "bench" blasted out of pure granite -- the cost overruns were dramatic even by railroad standards. The last spike was driven 15 November 1919 and connected El Centro with San Diego 146.4 miles away. For all the miles spent ascending thousands of feet (the highest point was Hipass at 3,660 ft above sea level some 82.4 miles from San Diego), El Centro lies 49 ft below sea level.

Spreckels died in 1926, more natural disasters hit the railroad, and in 1933 Spreckels' heirs sold the SD & A to the Southern Pacific, which incorporated the line as the wholly owned, but separately operated San Diego and Arizona Eastern Railway. It remained in this relationship with the Espee until the end of steam.


Class 56 (Locobase 11962)

Data from NdeM 1950 Locomotive Diagrams Standard Gauge supplied in December 2010 by Allen Stanley. See also DeGolyer, Volume 23, p. 302. Works numbers were 19094-19095 in June 1901; 20072-20077, 20107-20109 in February 1902.

This class was delivered as Vauclain compound engines and had the additional feature of the Vanderbilt firebox. Locobase 4104 describes this stayless variant of the basic firebox n greater detail. The piston valve that was common to both the HP and LP cylinders on each side measured 13" (331 mm) in diameter. Both departures from the norm--the firebox and compounding--proved to have short-lived attraction for North American railroads.

The cab panel was lettered for the El Paso-Rock Island Route, which was assembled by the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific with the EP&NE as the backbone in New Mexico and Texas For a description for this line, which was touted as the line with the lowest summit of all the California-bound railroads, see "A Railroad Boom", United States Investor, Volume XII, No 40 (5 October 1901) , p. 1514; and "Chapter Two--In Which the El Paso-Rock Island Route is Briefly Described" in John Sebastian, The Golden State-California-A Gratuitous Guide, (The Rock Island Company, 1903) pp. 19-27.

By the time the El Paso & Southwestern sold these to the Nacional de Mexico beginning in 1916, they had been transformed into simple-expansion engines; see Locobase 11961.


Class 60 / C-20 (Locobase 12958)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Volume 29, p 22. Works numbers were 28099-28100, 28101, 28133-28134 in May 1906; 29880-29881 in December; 29914-29916 in January 1907.

When the EP & SW went to Baldwin for more Consolidations in 1906, they retained the Harriman Common Standard grate area, but increased the boiler's capacity to serve a larger cylinder volume.

This class was later superheated; see Locobase 8695.


Class C-10 (Locobase 13786)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 37, p.140. See also dta from"Report of Committee on Power-Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway-Descriptions of Standard Types of Locomotives," American Engineer and Railroad Journal, Volume 79 ( March 1905), pp. 84-86. Works numbers were 36264-36271 in February 1911.

It has to be said that the "Associated Lines" got their money's worth from the adoption of a Harriman Common Standard. (See Locobase 5340 for a discussion of the HCS concept.) This set, like the other Southern Pacific HCS Consolidations was delivered wet. Piston valves measured 12" in diameter. One little tidbit: 2,940 gallons of oil fuel weighed 23,520 lb or 8 lb/US gallon (9.6 lb/Imperial gallon or 0.96 kg/litre).

A later modification that included a superheater is shown in Locobase 7279.


Class C-14 (Locobase 8688)

Data from EP&SW Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

This pair of EP&SW Consolidations had very small drivers under a relatively large boiler. The result was an oddly proportioned profile. Delivered to the Alamogordo & Sacramento Mountain as 2-8-0T tank engines (Locobase 12340), these were rebuilt by 1904 for the El Paso & Northeastern. In 1908 the EP & NE was absorbed by the EP & SW and the road numbers changed to 185-186.

Over time, 42 of the tubes were removed for a total reduction in heating surface area of 138 sq ft. 186 converted to oil burning in June 1911, followed by 185 in May 1914. During its career, the railroad changed driver diameters several times, probably mostly by increasing or decreasing tire thicknesses. The EP&SW's diagram indicates a unusual devotion to accuracy: In December 1906, driver diameter increased from 46" to 47", reverting to 46" in October 1910. A further 1/2" was trimmed in October 1915, then added back in April 1920.

185 was sold in April 1924 to Cloudcroft Lumber & Land as their #1; by 1926 the engine was G E Breece's #1. 186 became Southern Pacific 2504 in November 1924 and operated until scrapped in September 1935.


Class C-15 (Locobase 8689)

Data from SP Menke All Time Steam Locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 22, p. 247. Works numbers were 17397-17398 in January 1900, 17443-17444 in February.

This quintet of Consolidations was hiding from Locobase under its owner's heading, the New Mexico Railway and Coal Company. Very typical of a turn-of-the-century 2-8-0, this design was rated at 960 gross tons "of cars and lading" on a 1% grade, 500 on a 2% incline, and 220 up a 4% grade.

By 1904, the EP&NE had been taken into the El Paso & Southwestern, where they were renumbered. Like the C-14s shown in Locobase 8688, this set lost some tubes later on, paring down to 269 tubes for a total heating surface area of 1,981 sq ft.

When the EP & SW was taken over by the Southern Pacific, they were renumbered again. As the 2505-2508, they served until scrapped over an 11-year period from 1939 to 1950.


Class C-16 (Locobase 8690)

Data from SP Menke All Time Steam Locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works number was 18770 in March 1901.

The Arizona & New Mexico copper railway was headquartered in Clifton, Arizona and ran up to the Lordsburg junction with the Southern Pacific in New Mexico. Its highest point was at "the Divide" and amounted to 4,495 feet. The Arizona Copper Company sold the A & NM to the El Paso & Southwestern in 1922, which in turn came into the SP in 1924.


Class C-17 (Locobase 8691)

Data from SP Menke All Time Steam Locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works numbers were 20237 in March 1902 and 26656 in October 1905.

The L & H was a connecting road that met the SP at Lordsburg in southern New Mexico. It served the copper mining industry in that area and bought these two medium-power Consolidations three and a half years apart. As with many small copper roads in Arizona & New Mexico, the L & H went into the El Paso & Southwestern, which later merged with the Southern Pacific.

The pair of 2-8-0s lasted for almost 5 decades, only retiring in 1949.


Class C-18/C-19 (Locobase 8692)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works, Record of Recent Construction ((1903), No. 39, p. 259-260. Work #21065-21068, 21143-21144 in October 1902, 22028-22029 in April 1903 (road #159-160) and 22162-22163 (road 157-158, for some reason) in May 1903 .

These were followed by the 1904 C-19s, which shared the same dimensions but were heavier and had originally been bought by the New Mexico Coal & Railway Company. Works numbers for these ran 24320, 24326, 24334-35, 24354, 24365-66, 24376-77, 24422, 24586-89, 24622-23, 24671.

Apparently this was a set of Harriman Common Consolidations for the EP & NE The grate area suggests as much, anyway. The firebox heating surface area included 29.1 sq ft of arch tubes. Menke shows a smaller boiler, but a larger firebox for this class: 329 tubes in the boiler and 220 sq ft of firebox heating surface. This almost certainly reflected the addition of additional direct heating surface in the form of arch tubes and possibly a combustion chamber.

After the EP & NE was taken over by the El Paso & Northwestern, the class was renumbered as 251-260. It was during that time that the class was superheated; see Locobse 8693.


Class C-18b/C-18c/C-18d (Locobase 8693)

Data from EP&SW 10 1924 Steam Locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

When the EP & SW superheated its C-18 locomotives (see Locobase 8692 for the saturated-steam variant), it took the unusual step of shortening the tubes by 4" (flues too, naturally). Unlike many other such conversions, however, the C-18 modifications maintained boiler pressure at the previous level. It was still more rare to change driver diameters, but the EP & SW chose to sacrifice a modest amount of calculated tractive effort and put on new drivers measuring 1" more.

The C-18a had less firebox heating surface, probably because of the deletion of arch tubes. For some reason, the -18as were credited with only 501 square feet of superheater area. C-18b/-c/-d variants differed in the number of 2" tubes, the -bs having 213, the -cs 207,and the -d 211 tubes (and a 191-sq ft firebox). Total evaporative heating surface came to 2,476 sq ft, 2,388 sq ft, and 2,389 sq ft, respectively.

Now superheated, the class formed part of a large contingent of Consolidations that joined the SP when the latter took over the EP & SW in 1925. The first C-18 (probably not superheated) retired in 1934 while at least one saw out the steam era in 1959.


Class C-19a/C-19b (Locobase 8694)

Data from SP Menke All Time Steam Locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

See Locobase 8693 for the C-18 superheating modification. Like those, the C-19s had their tubes shortened by 4", the boiler pressure maintained at the earlier, higher setting, and their driver diameters increased by an inch. This combination of changes was very uncommon.

The specifications show the C-19a, which had 1/2" larger cylinders and 6 more tubes than the C-19b.


Class C-2 - simpled (Locobase 8682)

Data from SP Menke All Time Steam Locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

It's not clear if this was the first set of cross-compound Consolidations for the Espee, but it was certainly early. Locobase doesn't know the exact dimensions of the compound layout but believes it might have been the same as that shown in Locobase 4124 for the C-4 class. That design had a much bigger grate, however.

In any event, the SP soon converted the cross-compounds to simple-expansion working, retaining the long stroke more usually associated with Twelve-wheelers and Berkshires. And at a later date still, the railroad added a superheater; see Locobase 8683.


Class C-2 - superheated (Locobase 8683)

Data from SP Menke All Time Steam Locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Locobase 8682 shows the C-2s in their simple-expansion, saturated-boiler phase. At a later date, estimated here as 1930, the Espee superheated this class (and most likely the 6 C-3s that followed in 1900) as shown here. The specs give a superheater area of 651 sq ft, but that is much too high and is likely the "equivalent heating surface." Equivalent surface reflected the reasonable belief that the superheater contributed more than its share to the supply of steam. In calculating the areas, therefore, many US railroads multiplied each square foot of superheater by 1 1/2. Backing out the suspected inflation from the number given in the diagram yields the figure in the specs, which also gives a more reasonable percentage of superheat.

Like the C-3s, the C-2s operated into the latter days of steam.


Class C-20 (Locobase 8676)

Data from the T&NO 3-1932 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. (See Locobase 7235 for a description of the SA & AP railroad.) Works numbers were 62723-62725 in 1921.

Very late in the Cooke works' existence, the Paterson builder delivered three small, superheated Consolidations to the SA & AP. Not long after they went into service for the SA & AP, that railroad came under the Texas & New Orleans.

Still serving a purpose, the compact Consolidations carried on into the 1950s, with 868 being scrapped first on 12 October 1953, followed by 867 (28 July 1954), and ending with 869 on 5 August 1955.

NB: The T&NO diagrams do not show the flue heating surface area, so Locobase estimates the evaporative heating surface by adding the calculated area of both tubes and flues to the stated firebox heating surface area.


Class C-22 - superheated (Locobase 8677)

Data from T&NO 3 - 1932 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 from his extensive collection.

Of the six engines purchased by the SA&AP from the Monongahela (which Pittsburgh had originally built for the Pittsburgh & Lake Erie in 1897-1900--see Locobase 7072), four were superheated by the SA&AP after their arrival. Unlike many other such conversions, these engines kept their inside link motion.

Five of the six were scrapped in the late 1930s (872-873 in November 1936 and 871, 875-876 in January 1937). Somehow, 874 eluded the ferro-knacker's torch for another twelve years, serving through World War Two before being scrapped in February 1947.


Class C-22 / C-28 (Locobase 8696)

Data from EP&SW 10 - 1924 Steam Locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Alco-Schenectady supplied these Consolidations in 1907-1908. Like the C-26/C-27 engines (Locobase 8695), these were later superheated, then equipped with Walschaert gear; their cylinders were supplied through relatively large 14" (356 mm) piston valves.. Some were fitted with Worthington feedwater heater and classed C-28a SF. C-23/C-28b applied to those with 23" cylinders and operating at 200 psi; see Locobase 8697 for the those engines.

When the EP & SW joined the Southern Pacific in 1924, the Espee leased the C-28s to the Southern Pacific de Mexico. In 1942, Espee retrieved many of the engines to bolster their power.


Class C-23 (Locobase 7252)

Data from the SA&AP 6 - 1917 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. DeGolyer, Volume 48, p 223. Works numbers were 40622-40629 in September 1913.

(See Locobase 7235 for a description of the Mission Route.)

These Baldwins were quite small compared to the run of Consolidations then being purchased for US railroads. They rode lightly and had small boilers and grates.

According to Baldwin's specs, however, they were shiny as they were specified on page 228 to have "two even, uniform coats" of Murphy's Black Engine Varnish applied to chest and dome covers, wheel centers, exposed castings, brake rigging, couplers and coupler castings as well as many other components. The front ends, stack and exposed parts of the firebox were to have the same kind of attention paid with Chas.R Long, Jr Staybrite. Two coats of primer and two coats of Chas R. Long, Jr Acme Plastic Paint went on the cab roof while the cab interior received one coat of the same company's Cream Cobalt Cab Enamel. And the tender had even more meticulous detailing.

All survived to be renumbered as Texas & New Orleans engines in the Southern Pacific systems and served southeast Texas for years. The first in the class retired in 1939, the last in 1954.


Class C-23 - superheated (Locobase 8678)

Data from theT&NO 3 - 1932 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. (See Locobase 7235 for a description of this SouthEast Texas railroad.)

At some point after this class joined the SA & AP in 1913 (see Locobase 7252), the class was superheated as shown in the specs above. The small boiler meant that evaporative heating surface area was cut nearly in half to add a small superheater section. All survived to be renumbered as Texas & New Orleans engines in the Southern Pacific systems and served southeast Texas for years. The first in the class retired in 1939, the last in 1954.


Class C-23 / C-28b / C-29 (Locobase 8697)

Data from EP&SW 10 - 1924 Steam Locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Locobase 8696 shows the Alco 2-8-0s with 25" x 30" cylinders operating at 170 psi after their superheaters were installed in 1911-1913. The other two of the original 20-locomotive class were rebored with smaller cylinders, but boilers pressed to the original level. This must have represented an experiment to see which was preferable: larger cylinders using superheated steam from a lower-pressure boiler or leaving the BP unchanged, but reducing both the cylinder volume and piston-valve diameter, the latter to 12" (306 mm).


Class C-24 - superheated (Locobase 8679)

Data from the SA&AP 6 - 1917 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. (See Locobase 7235 for a description of this SouthEast Texas railroad.)

The ten-locomotive class delivered by Lima in 1913 (Locobase 7251) underwent the same relatively mild boiler modifications to gain the advantage of a moderate amount of superheat.

Like most of the SA&AP engines, most of the class operated through World War Two. Two that did not-- 886 and 889--were scrapped in January 1937.

894 was the first to be scrapped after the war ended, going in December 1949. 888 and 892 were scrapped in 1953 and the others in 1955.


Class C-26/C-27 (Locobase 8695)

Data from SP Menke All Time Steam Locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

In the early teens, the railroad superheated the design as shown in the specs. Relatively capacious 14" piston valves replaced the slide valves at that time. Ten years later, the design was further updated with the addition of Walschaert radial valve gear.

When the EP & SW joined the Southern Pacific a year later, the Espee renumbered the C-26 & C-27s quintet and leased them to the Southern Pacific de Mexico. In 1942, Espee retrieved the engines (and renumbered them 3440-3449) to bolster their power, selling them to the FC del Pacifico in November 1951.


Class C-3 (Locobase 14416)

Data from "Recent Schenectady Locomotive", The Railway Age (19 May 1899).


Class C-4 (Locobase 4124)

Profiled in the 5 April 1901 Railroad Gazette, this class of cross-compounds had an impressive number of tubes and a generous heating surface for Consolidations of their time. Note the long stroke and the wide firebox; the latter distinguishes it from its Schenectady predecessors shown in Locobase 8682.

As this class aged, the railroad soon changed it over to simple-expansion and later superheated it; see Locobase 8684.

Retirements for this class began in 1935 and extended 22 years.


Class C-4 - superheated (Locobase 8684)

Data from SP Menke All Time Steam Locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Locobase 4124 shows the original cross-compound, saturated-boiler design that came on the Espee in 1901. Not too long after entering service, the class saw its cylinders replaced with the 22" x 34" cans shown in the description. Much later, the railroad added a superheater, which contributed a satisfactory amount of additional power.

Retirements for this class began in 1935 and extended 22 years.


Class C-5 (Locobase 8685)

Data from SP Menke All Time Steam Locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Although the C-5 used the same grate and essentially the same firebox as the Schenectady-built C-4s shown in Locobase 4124, Baldwin adopted its proprietary 4-cylinder Vauclain compounding system. Another significant difference was the size of the class, which was nearly double the combined C-2/C-3/C-4 cross-compound series.

Baldwin delivered the class in a little over a year as follows:

Works # Produced

19850-19856, 19870, 19877, 19881-19882, 19894-19899 December 1901

19971, 20005-20006 January 1902

20783-20786 August 1902

20920-20923, 20971-20972 September 1902

21204, 21221, 21244, 21286-21287, 21303-21304 November 1902

21362-21363, 21384-21385 December 1902

21437, 21453, 21463, 21479 January 1903

21727, 21732, 21756, 21760 March 1903

Like the other compounds, these would be simpled to match a batch of 16 1903 C-5s that were delivered with 22" x 30" cylinders; see Locobase 8686 for that variant.


Class C-5 - simple (Locobase 8686)

Data from DeGolyer, Volume 25, 142 and Volume 26, pp. 170 and 240. SP Menke All Time Steam Locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works numbers 21813, 21826, 21851 in March 1903; 23323, 23328, 23346-23347, 23369, 23386, 23397, 23405, 23413, 23418, 23429, 23433, 23514 in December; and 23519 in January 1904 show that the SP production was a small part of a big order book.

Most of the C-5 class was delivered as 4-cylinder Vauclain compounds (Locobase 8685), but the last sixteen arrived as simple-expansion engines. Possibly as a result of the Espee's experience with the slightly later C-8 design (Locobase 3165), the C-5 boiler later held just 416 small tubes and had a slightly smaller firebox heating surface of 172 sq ft. As a result, total heating surface decreased to 3,367 sq ft.

The Vauclains also were converted to the simple-expansion layout before the decade was out in most cases. The next step, which came in the 1920s, was to superheat this large class; see Locobase 8687.


Class C-5 - superheated (Locobase 8687)

Data from SP Menke All Time Steam Locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

The two parts of the C-5 class shown in Locobases 8685-8686 were soon merged into one simple-expansion design. Some time later the whole class (or at least the survivors) were superheated. The boiler pressure also increased by 10 psi. Probably because the boiler was roomy to begin with, replacing tubes with flues (and the elements within the flues) resulted in very little total heating surface lost. So the resulting locomotive was quite a bit more powerful.

Like the other Espee Consolidations, these were retired over a long period stretching from 1934 to 1952.


Class C-57/C-9 (Locobase 15024)

Data from DeGolyer, Vol 28, pp. 12+. See also Anglo-Mexican Petroleum Products Co, Ltd, Mexican Fuel Oil (London: Anglo-Mexican, 1914), p. 41-42. (Note: other road numbers included 2800-2021 and 2831-2836.) Works numbers were

1905

25295-25298, 25311-25313, 25333, 25349, 25364-25365, 25374, 25399-25400 in March; 25440-25443, 25464. 25468, 25483-25485, 25493, 25506-25508, 25544-25547, 25551-25552, 25566-25567, 25583-25584, 25591-25595 in April; 25612-25613 in May.

1906

27243, 27263-27269, 27278-27281, 27293-27297 in January; 27616-27617 in February; 27632-27633, 27643, 27663, 27669, 27681-27684, 27701, 27710, 27724, 27778 in March; 29064-29066, 29073-29074, 29092, 29105-29106 in September; 29186, 29205 in October

1907

30282-30286, 30304 in February; 30324-30329, 30360-30361, 30383, 30438, 30450, 30454-30459, 30540-30541, 30542 in March; 31113-31116, 31145-31146, 31158-31159, 31168, 31173-31174, 31178-31180 in June; 31181, 31218-31222, 31365, 31380, 31388, 31398-31401, 31436-31437 in July; 31453-31457, 31494-31497, 31515-31516, 31578, 31612, 31629-31630 in August; 31831 in September.

Part of the so-called "Harriman Common Standard" stud of 350 Consolidations built to the same design, this class was completed without a superheater. These were oil-burners with the standard grate, but relatively small fireboxes. The Von Boden-Ingles burner's "special feature", according to the Mexican Fuel Oil report, was the outside atomization of oil and steam on the corrugated lip that extended from the steam feed and below the the oil feed. So the fuel dripping onto the lip was atomized when it encountered the steam flow from the lower tube. According to the Mexican Fuel Oil description: "This does away with the waste and dripping of oil and cutting down of the fire to a candle flame, and leaving [it] in that condition for any length of time."

The class was superheated beginning in 1922; see Locobase 7279.


Class C-8 (Locobase 3165)

Data from"Report of Committe on Power-Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway-Descriptions of Standard Types of Locomotives," American Engineer and Railroad Journal, Volume 79 ( March 1905), pp. 84-86. See also Locobase 15024 for the Espee's Von Boden-Ingles oil-burning system.

Baldwin works numbers (road 2694-2726) were 23702, 23712, 23718-23719, 23736-23737, 23742, 23790-23791, 23806-23810 in February 1904; 23827-23828, 23836-23839, 23851, 23887-23890, 23898-23899, 23920-23921, 23925, 23947, 23952, 24014 in March. 2727-2751 were built by Alco at its Schenectady works.

Part of the so-called "Harriman Common Standard" stud of 350 Consolidations built to the same design, this class was completed without a superheater. A later increase in boiler pressure to 210 lb increased TE to 45,470 lb; the engines also received superheaters.

Like most of the HCS 2-8-0s, this class soldiered on to the end of steam in the 1950s.

Bill Schneider, writing for the San Diego Railroad Museum in March 1993, notes that the SRDM's C-8, SD&AE #104, pulled passenger trains on the San Diego-Campo-El Centro mainline (originally built as the San Diego & Arizona) because it was considered to be the railroad's smoothest-riding locomotive. The SRDM site notes that this is the only remaining engine from the stud owned by San Diego County railroads.


Class C-8s /C-9s/C-10s (Locobase 7279)

Data from SD&AE 11 - 1943 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

As shown in Locobase 3165, the Espee and its subsidiaries (such as the San Diego & Arizona Eastern, from whose diagram book the above data -- except for the superheater area -- are taken) bought hundreds of "Harriman Common Standard" Consolidations. Over the years, many were superheated -- this entry shows the differences in heating surface areas, tube & flue distribution, and weights that resulted. Like most of the HCS 2-8-0s, this class soldiered on to the end of steam in the 1950s.

Bill Schneider, writing for the San Diego Railroad Museum in March 1993, notes that the SRDM's C-8, SD&AE #104, pulled passenger trains on the San Diego-Campo-El Centro mainline (originally built as the San Diego & Arizona) because it was considered to be the railroad's smoothest-riding locomotive. The SRDM site notes that this is the only remaining engine from the stud owned by San Diego County railroads.


Class C-9 (Locobase 8675)

Data from T&NO 3-1932 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

As shown in Locobase 3165 and 7279, the Harriman Common Standard C-8 was widely used throughout the Espee system and most of the railroads superheated at least some of theirs in the 1920s. The T & NO bought some slightly different HCS engines from Baldwin and Brooks in 1905-1908 and refitted them with superheaters. This version had fewer tubes or flues (and hence somewhat less superheater surface); they also weighed a little more. And at least initially, they retained the Stephenson link motion rather than changing over to Walschaert radial gear.

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class1 / C-18101 / C-31101 / C-31s14 / C-4021
Locobase ID7700 7272 7280 14249 12663
RailroadFlorence & Cripple Creek (SP)San Diego & Arizona (SP)San Diego & Arizona (SP)Nevada-California-Oregon (SP)El Paso & Southwestern (SP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class122213
Road Numbers1-12101-102101-10214 / 1 / 921-22, 57 /55-57/214-216
Gauge3'StdStd3'Std
Number Built12213
BuilderBurnham, Williams & CoAlco-SchenectadyshopsBaldwinBurnham, Williams & Co
Year18941914192019141903
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonWalschaertStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase10.83'15.67'15.67'11.75'14.25'
Engine Wheelbase18.17'24.50'24.50'18.92'22.83'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.60 0.64 0.64 0.62 0.62
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)44'50.44'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers64000 lbs193000 lbs198300 lbs84000 lbs165300 lbs
Engine Weight72000 lbs216500 lbs223840 lbs94000 lbs182350 lbs
Tender Light Weight57000 lbs80000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight129000 lbs174000 lbs
Tender Water Capacity2000 gals4000 gals6500 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)7 tons tons tons1600 gals gals
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)27 lb/yard80 lb/yard83 lb/yard35 lb/yard69 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter38"57"57"40"51"
Boiler Pressure160 psi200 psi210 psi180 psi190 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)16" x 20"22" x 30"22" x 30"17" x 20"22" x 28"
Tractive Effort18324 lbs43305 lbs45471 lbs22109 lbs42915 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.49 4.46 4.36 3.80 3.85
Heating Ability
Firebox Area87.50 sq. ft171 sq. ft171 sq. ft100 sq. ft200 sq. ft
Grate Area14.06 sq. ft49.50 sq. ft49.50 sq. ft14 sq. ft37 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1012 sq. ft3489 sq. ft2780 sq. ft1183 sq. ft2630 sq. ft
Superheating Surface570 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface1012 sq. ft3489 sq. ft3350 sq. ft1183 sq. ft2630 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume217.44264.34210.62225.15213.49
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation225099001039525207030
Same as above plus superheater percentage225099001216225207030
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area1400034200420151800038000
Power L1315662531324838444759
Power MT434.86285.71589.14403.55253.88

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class240 / C-2450 / C-305660 / C-20C-10
Locobase ID7251 7271 11962 12958 13786
RailroadSan Antonio & Aransas Pass (SP)San Diego & Arizona (SP)El Paso & Northeastern (SP)El Paso & Southwestern (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class10110108
Road Numbers240-249 / 885-8945056-57, 68-7560-69 / 280-2892831-2838
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built110108
BuilderLimaBaldwinBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoBaldwin
Year19131911190119061911
Valve GearWalschaertStephensonWalschaertWalschaertStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase15.25'14'15.75'15.67'15.67'
Engine Wheelbase22.25'21.46'24.33'24.33'24.33'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.69 0.65 0.65 0.64 0.64
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)56.16'54.33'59.42'55.98'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)48700 lbs
Weight on Drivers147750 lbs122000 lbs160000 lbs187000 lbs187000 lbs
Engine Weight165650 lbs137000 lbs180000 lbs208000 lbs208000 lbs
Tender Light Weight124200 lbs100000 lbs160000 lbs156155 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight289850 lbs237000 lbs368000 lbs364155 lbs
Tender Water Capacity6000 gals5000 gals6000 gals8000 gals9000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)2500 gals2500 gals gals12 tons2940 gals
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)62 lb/yard51 lb/yard67 lb/yard78 lb/yard78 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter50"50"60"57"57"
Boiler Pressure190 psi180 psi200 psi200 psi200 psi
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke)20" x 26"20" x 24"17" x 30"22" x 30"22" x 30"
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke)28" x 30" (2)
Tractive Effort33592 lbs29376 lbs35897 lbs43305 lbs43305 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.40 4.15 4.46 4.32 4.32
Heating Ability
Firebox Area163 sq. ft134.80 sq. ft172.20 sq. ft177 sq. ft177 sq. ft
Grate Area25.60 sq. ft29.80 sq. ft35 sq. ft49.50 sq. ft49.50 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface2401 sq. ft1534 sq. ft2626 sq. ft3273 sq. ft3403 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface2401 sq. ft1534 sq. ft2626 sq. ft3273 sq. ft3403 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume253.97175.78333.20247.97257.82
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation48645364700099009900
Same as above plus superheater percentage48645364700099009900
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area3097024264344403540035400
Power L153863795326259856173
Power MT321.46274.31179.79282.24291.10

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassC-14C-15C-16C-17C-18/C-19
Locobase ID8688 8689 8690 8691 8692
RailroadEl Paso & Southwestern (SP)El Paso & Northeastern (SP)Arizona & New Mexico (SP)Lordsburg & Hachita (SP)El Paso & Northeastern (SP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class241227
Road Numbers103-10452-55/181-184/2505-250817 / 176 / 250919, 24 / 217-18 / 2510-11151-177
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built41227
BuilderEP&SWBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & Co
Year18991900190119021902
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase12.33'12.75'14'14.25'16'
Engine Wheelbase20.25'21.58'21.33'22.83'24.58'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.61 0.59 0.66 0.62 0.65
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)46.58'49.75'48.25'50.42'54.29'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers124800 lbs126000 lbs88000 lbs160000 lbs161110 lbs
Engine Weight140600 lbs141000 lbs100000 lbs176000 lbs179610 lbs
Tender Light Weight106850 lbs110415 lbs70000 lbs100000 lbs132390 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight247450 lbs251415 lbs170000 lbs276000 lbs312000 lbs
Tender Water Capacity6000 gals6000 gals3000 gals3900 gals6000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)1625 gals10 tons10 tons2100 gals gals
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)52 lb/yard53 lb/yard37 lb/yard67 lb/yard67 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter46"50"51"51"57"
Boiler Pressure160 psi160 psi160 psi180 psi200 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)21" x 24"21" x 26"18" x 24"21.5" x 28"22" x 28"
Tractive Effort31292 lbs31188 lbs20736 lbs38829 lbs40418 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.99 4.04 4.24 4.12 3.99
Heating Ability
Firebox Area138.40 sq. ft141 sq. ft103 sq. ft202.80 sq. ft152.20 sq. ft
Grate Area28 sq. ft28 sq. ft19.70 sq. ft37.10 sq. ft49.50 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1909 sq. ft2102 sq. ft1185 sq. ft2648 sq. ft3027 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface1909 sq. ft2102 sq. ft1185 sq. ft2648 sq. ft3027 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume198.42201.67167.64225.06245.72
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation44804480315266789900
Same as above plus superheater percentage44804480315266789900
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area2214422560164803650430440
Power L133163591327147625842
Power MT234.31251.33327.79262.46319.77

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassC-18b/C-18c/C-18dC-19a/C-19bC-2 - simpledC-2 - superheatedC-20
Locobase ID8693 8694 8682 8683 8676
RailroadEl Paso & Northeastern (SP)El Paso & Southwestern (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)San Antonio & Aransas Pass (SP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class1017663
Road Numbers151-160 / 251-260 / 3400-3409161-1772600-26052600-2605260-262 / 867-869
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built63
BuilderEP & SWEP & SWSchenectadySPAlco-Cooke
Year19161916189919161921
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonWalschaertStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase16'16'15.67'15.67'22'
Engine Wheelbase24.58'24.58'24.33'24.33'21.62'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.65 0.65 0.64 0.64 1.02
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)54.90'57.48'49.06'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers169500 lbs177800 lbs172000 lbs180000 lbs124200 lbs
Engine Weight191500 lbs198500 lbs190000 lbs201300 lbs141000 lbs
Tender Light Weight124000 lbs132514 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight315500 lbs331014 lbs
Tender Water Capacity6050 gals7000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)11.5 tons10 tons tons tons tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)71 lb/yard74 lb/yard72 lb/yard75 lb/yard52 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter57"58"57"57"50"
Boiler Pressure200 psi200 psi185 psi190 psi180 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)22" x 28"22.5" x 28"22" x 34"22" x 34"19" x 26"
Tractive Effort40418 lbs41547 lbs45398 lbs46625 lbs28721 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.19 4.28 3.79 3.86 4.32
Heating Ability
Firebox Area200.20 sq. ft221 sq. ft205 sq. ft205 sq. ft147 sq. ft
Grate Area49.50 sq. ft49.50 sq. ft35.25 sq. ft35.25 sq. ft30.10 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface2511 sq. ft2476 sq. ft3043 sq. ft2252 sq. ft1433 sq. ft
Superheating Surface582 sq. ft501 sq. ft434 sq. ft232 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface3093 sq. ft2977 sq. ft3043 sq. ft2686 sq. ft1665 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume203.83192.15203.42150.55167.95
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation99009900652166985418
Same as above plus superheater percentage1178111583652177696177
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area4764851714379254518230164
Power L11349512138477986677482
Power MT702.10602.02245.02424.61531.24

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassC-22 - superheatedC-22 / C-28C-23C-23 - superheatedC-23 / C-28b / C-29
Locobase ID8677 8696 7252 8678 8697
RailroadSan Antonio & Aransas Pass (SP)El Paso & Southwestern (SP)San Antonio & Aransas Pass (SP)San Antonio & Aransas Pass (SP)El Paso & Southwestern (SP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class418882
Road Numbers230-235 / 871-874292-309/3452-3469250-257 / 877-884877-884290-291 / 3450-3451
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built8
BuilderSA&APEP&SWBaldwinSA & APEP&SW
Year19151911191319201912
Valve GearStephensonWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase14.25'15.67'15'15'15.67'
Engine Wheelbase22.25'24.33'23.58'23.58'24.33'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.64 0.64 0.64 0.64 0.64
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)57.88'57.88'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers141000 lbs197200 lbs139055 lbs144055 lbs197200 lbs
Engine Weight157000 lbs226400 lbs155115 lbs160115 lbs226400 lbs
Tender Light Weight101090 lbs125180 lbs125180 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight258090 lbs280295 lbs285295 lbs
Tender Water Capacity5700 gals6000 gals6000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)2000 gals gals2500 gals2500 gals gals
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)59 lb/yard82 lb/yard58 lb/yard60 lb/yard82 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter50"57"50"50"57"
Boiler Pressure180 psi170 psi180 psi180 psi200 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)20" x 28"25" x 30"20" x 26"20" x 26"23" x 30"
Tractive Effort34272 lbs47533 lbs31824 lbs31824 lbs47332 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.11 4.15 4.37 4.53 4.17
Heating Ability
Firebox Area162.50 sq. ft180 sq. ft149 sq. ft149 sq. ft180 sq. ft
Grate Area25.60 sq. ft49.50 sq. ft29.60 sq. ft29.60 sq. ft49.50 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1491 sq. ft2796 sq. ft2021 sq. ft1583 sq. ft2796 sq. ft
Superheating Surface299 sq. ft568 sq. ft271 sq. ft568 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface1790 sq. ft3364 sq. ft2021 sq. ft1854 sq. ft3364 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume146.45164.04213.77167.44193.81
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation46088415532853289900
Same as above plus superheater percentage539198465328612711583
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area3422335802268203084342120
Power L1735883464389756411601
Power MT460.19373.22278.34463.04518.78

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassC-24 - superheatedC-26/C-27C-3C-4C-4 - superheated
Locobase ID8679 8695 14416 4124 8684
RailroadSan Antonio & Aransas Pass (SP)El Paso & Southwestern (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class101061212
Road Numbers885-89460-64 / 280-284 / 3440-4919152612-26232612-2623
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built612
BuilderSA&APEP & SWAlco-SchenectadyAlco-SchenectadyAlco-Schenectady
Year19201913189919011916
Valve GearWalschaertWalschaertStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase15.25'15.67'15.67'15.67'15.67'
Engine Wheelbase22.25'24.33'24.33'24.33'24.33'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.69 0.64 0.64 0.64 0.64
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)56.16'59.29'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers154750 lbs189900 lbs173000 lbs176000 lbs183200 lbs
Engine Weight170650 lbs218400 lbs193000 lbs200000 lbs210200 lbs
Tender Light Weight124200 lbs162000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight294850 lbs380400 lbs
Tender Water Capacity6000 gals8000 gals4000 gals4500 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)2500 gals12 tons9 tons9 tons tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)64 lb/yard79 lb/yard72 lb/yard73 lb/yard76 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter50"57"57"57"57"
Boiler Pressure190 psi170 psi220 psi220 psi190 psi
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke)20" x 26"25" x 30"23" x 34"23" x 34"22" x 34"
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke)35" x 34" (1)35" x 34" (1)
Tractive Effort33592 lbs47533 lbs41210 lbs41210 lbs46625 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.61 4.00 4.20 4.27 3.93
Heating Ability
Firebox Area163 sq. ft191.10 sq. ft210.50 sq. ft177 sq. ft173 sq. ft
Grate Area25.60 sq. ft49.50 sq. ft35.30 sq. ft54.50 sq. ft54.50 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1882 sq. ft2742 sq. ft2817 sq. ft3599 sq. ft2695 sq. ft
Superheating Surface331 sq. ft568 sq. ft553 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface2213 sq. ft3310 sq. ft2817 sq. ft3599 sq. ft3248 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume199.07160.88344.59440.25180.16
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation4864841577661199010355
Same as above plus superheater percentage5594984677661199012115
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area3561638010463103894038458
Power L1950683474272495110301
Power MT541.70387.61217.76248.07495.85

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassC-5C-5 - simpleC-5 - superheatedC-57/C-9C-8
Locobase ID8685 8686 8687 15024 3165
RailroadSouthern Pacific (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class54707015758
Road Numbers2624-26772678-26932624-26932513-99, 2677-2726, 2752-28302694-2751
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built541615758
BuilderBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoSPBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & Co
Year19011903191619051904
Valve GearStephensonStephensonWalschaertStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase15.67'15.67'15.67'15.67'15.67'
Engine Wheelbase24.33'24.33'24.33'24.33'24.33'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.64 0.64 0.64 0.64 0.64
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)53.17'55.98'55.98'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers180000 lbs180000 lbs187000 lbs184000 lbs187000 lbs
Engine Weight201150 lbs201150 lbs210150 lbs207000 lbs208000 lbs
Tender Light Weight109000 lbs132480 lbs135050 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight310150 lbs339480 lbs343050 lbs
Tender Water Capacity6000 gals7300 gals7000 gals9000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)3300 gals gals2940 gals3535 gals
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)75 lb/yard75 lb/yard78 lb/yard77 lb/yard78 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter57"57"57"57"57"
Boiler Pressure200 psi200 psi210 psi200 psi200 psi
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke)17" x 30"22" x 30"22" x 30"22" x 30"22" x 30"
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke)28" x 30" (2)
Tractive Effort37787 lbs43305 lbs45471 lbs43305 lbs43305 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.76 4.16 4.11 4.25 4.32
Heating Ability
Firebox Area213.10 sq. ft182.20 sq. ft180 sq. ft171.30 sq. ft177 sq. ft
Grate Area54.50 sq. ft54.50 sq. ft54.50 sq. ft49.50 sq. ft49.50 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface3603 sq. ft3573 sq. ft2702 sq. ft3397 sq. ft3403 sq. ft
Superheating Surface568 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface3603 sq. ft3573 sq. ft3270 sq. ft3397 sq. ft3403 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume457.16270.70204.71257.37257.82
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation10900109001144599009900
Same as above plus superheater percentage10900109001339199009900
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area4262036440442263426035400
Power L1414964551317161236173
Power MT203.27316.24621.11293.45291.10

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassC-8s /C-9s/C-10sC-9
Locobase ID7279 8675
RailroadSouthern Pacific (SP)Texas & New Orleans (SP)
CountryUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-0
Number in Class18640
Road Numbers808-27, 829-30, 832-49
GaugeStdStd
Number Built
BuilderSPT & NO
Year19221922
Valve GearWalschaertStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase15.67'15.67'
Engine Wheelbase24.33'24.33'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.64 0.64
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)55.98'55.98'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)50350 lbs
Weight on Drivers191900 lbs193700 lbs
Engine Weight216700 lbs217800 lbs
Tender Light Weight135050 lbs135050 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight351750 lbs352850 lbs
Tender Water Capacity9000 gals9000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)3535 gals3535 gals
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)80 lb/yard81 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter57"57"
Boiler Pressure210 psi210 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)22" x 30"22" x 30"
Tractive Effort45471 lbs45471 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.22 4.26
Heating Ability
Firebox Area189 sq. ft177 sq. ft
Grate Area49.50 sq. ft49.50 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface2897 sq. ft2725 sq. ft
Superheating Surface600 sq. ft530 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface3497 sq. ft3255 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume219.49206.45
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation1039510395
Same as above plus superheater percentage1216212058
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area4643743117
Power L11396912666
Power MT641.92576.64

Photos

Reference


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