Canadian Pacific / Intercolonial Coal Mining Company 4-6-0 Locomotives in Canada


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class C1a-superheated (Locobase 15707)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. The original quartet of saturated Ten-wheelers was built in the CPR's shops as works 1108-1111 in 1889.

Locobase estimates the date for two of the four C1a to be superheated by comparing their makeover to that of the B2c (Locobase 15704). Both had new superheated boilers of nearly identical length (and thus creating a short Ten-wheeler), new fireboxes, and higher centerlines.


Class C1c (Locobase 15710)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Works numbers 2982, 2994-2996 in January 1894.


Class C1d (Locobase 15711)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Works number 5133 in 1896.

Both this locomotive and the compound shown in Locobase 15712 were originally delivered to the Keokuk & Western. This simple-expansion Ten-wheeler used 17" x 24" cylinders when it was delivered as #3, but the K&W returned the engine because it was too heavy for their track.

So Rogers rebuilt the locomotive with the 18" cylinders shown in the specs and sold it in February 1898 to the Canadian Pacific. After several numbers changes, the 224 was scrapped in May 1928.


Class C1e (Locobase 15712)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Works number was 5132 in July 1896.

Both this locomotive and the compound shown in Locobase 15711 were originally delivered to the Keokuk & Western. This compound Ten-wheeler was delivered as a simple-expansion engine when it was delivered as #1, but the K&W returned the engine because it was too heavy for their track.

Back at the Rogers Works, the 1 was rebuilt as a cross-compound that used one 19" HP and one 29" LP cylinder. Delivered to the CPR as their 533, the single C1e was rebuilt again in 1906 with the compound setup shown in the specs. After another two decades in service, the 327 was scrapped in October 1926.


Class C1f (Locobase 15713)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Works numbers 1118-1123 in 1890.

Like the other classes in the Canadian Pacific, these engines shared their power dimensions (cylinder volume, boiler pressure, and driver diameter) with many other subclasses. Differences focused mainly on the size of the firebox and the boiler. This Ten-wheeler quintet of freight engines were about average size for this period in CPR motive power acquisition.


Class C2a (Locobase 15714)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Works numbers were 1233-1235 in 1897.

Cross-compounds like many others with which the CPR defied North American tendencies, the C2a shown here were built later than other C2a locomotives in the roster and all three were transferred to the Esquimalt & Nanaimo in September 1913 as their 40-42. The last of the three was reclassified C3a when the CPR removed the cross-compound cylinders and replaced them with a set of two 19" x 24" simple-expansion vessels.


Class D10a, b, c -21, V&H, 22, link (Locobase 15735)

Data from 1947 CP Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 and CP 1911-24 supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

Class Road numbers Builder Date Works numbers

D10a 700-709 Canadian Locomotive Company 1905 679-688

D10b 710-739 Montreal Locomotive Works 1905 31202-31231

D10c 740-749 CPR Angus shops 1905 1416-1425

D10c 670-684 CLC 1906 721-735

D10b 685-699 MLW 1906 39365-39379

D10b/c 750-769 MLW 1906 39380-39399

D10c 770-780 CPR 1906 1447-1456

Beginning about two decades after several classes of Ten-wheelers entered CPR service, the railway built over 500 D10 locomotives to this design. Compared to the 1880s locomotives, these had significantly bigger boilers and fireboxes and substantially higher axle loadings.

D10s were delivered over an eight-year period from 1905-1913 by Alco-Richmond, Alco-Schenectady, Canadian Loco Works, Canadian Pacific, and Montreal Loco Works. and they served all over Canada until the end of steam.

Canada's Science & Technology Museum explains the class's success under the self-explanatory title "A Canadian Workhorse" at its website ([] -- consulted in May 2002):

"Their success lay in a dependable and uncomplicated design, which incorporated such technical improvements as piston valves [11"/279 mm] and simplified valve gear, devices just gaining acceptance in North America at that time. They were an effective platform for Canadian Pacific's innovative study of superheaters that lead to that energy saving device's acceptance on North American railways.

"These engines were a transitional design that reflected changes in locomotive engineering while also retaining some features typical of nineteenth-century engines. For example, the engine cabs were of a simple open design."

The design truly was a standard one. All used the same grate and firebox and all would include 29 sq ft (2.7 sq m) of arch tubes. All 500+ engines rolled on 63" (1,600 mm) drivers, all had the same cylinder stroke of 28" (711 mm), and all weighed about the same.

But the details differed, although exactly which locomotives had what combination of superheater type, flue count, and cylinder diameter is difficult to determine precisely. It should be noted that those with 21" cylinders set their boilers to 200 psi (13.8 bar) while those with the larger 22 1/2" cylinder diameter dropped that setting by 20 psi to 180 psi (12.4 bar).

All D10s were fitted later with four arch tubes that added 29 sq ft (2.7 sq m) to the firebox heating surface, bringing it to 209 sq ft (19.4 sq m).

Locobase offers a general view of the class in several entries. The present one features Vaughan-Horsey superheaters with 22 flues and 21"-diameter cylinders. Road numbers shown above come from the 1911 book, which lists engine numbers by class, builder, and date.

Writing about My First Trip as 'The Engineer' on the West Coast Railway Association's website [] (3 Dec 2004), Bill Yeats heartily endorses the general view of this class, but notes one limitation of the arrangement: "With three pairs of 63 inch driving wheels these machines were good for 65 m.p.h. but at that speed they were inclined to ride a bit rough because they lacked the stabilizing effect that a trailing truck under the firebox would have had." Another limitations that Yeats encountered when he first started firing the class in 1943: "Except for a few that were converted to burn oil, all D 10's were hand fired and they would have been easier to fire if the 70 by 102 inch firebox had been deeper. As it was the ashes had to be cleaned out of the fire about every thirty miles or so because of the soft dirty coal we used."

Some of the first group of D10s were delivered as camelbacks:nd they were reboilered after about 2 years of service.

As can be imagined, this large group was retired over a long period from 1938-1965.


Class D10b 21, TBolt 30 (Locobase 15738)

Data from 1947 CP Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. See Locobase 15735 for the full description of the D10 engine design. Works numbers were 52099-52123

Locobase offers a general view of the class in several entries. The present one features the 30-flue Schmidt superheaters with the TeeBolt header and 21"-diameter cylinders. By the time the 1944 CP MP14 equipment register was compiled, over 125 of the Vaughan-Horsey locomotives had been converted to Schmidt superheaters.

All D10s later were fitted with four arch tubes that added 29 sq ft (2.7 sq m) to the firebox heating surface, bringing it to 209 sq ft (19.4 sq m).


Class D10d - 22 1/2, V&H 24, link (Locobase 15740)

Data from 1947 CP Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 and CP 1911-24 supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. See Locobase 15735 for the full description of the D10 engine design.

Class Road numbers Builder Date Works numbers

D10d 600-624 Alco-Richmond 1907 43067-43091

D10d 625-639 Montreal Locomotive Works 1907 43109-43123

D10d 640-669, 781-784 MLW 1907 42097-42128

All D10s later were fitted with four arch tubes that added 29 sq ft (2.7 sq m) to the firebox heating surface, bringing it to 209 sq ft (19.4 sq m).

Locobase offers a general view of the class in several entries. The present one features Vaughan-Horsey superheaters with 24 flues,, 22 1/2"-diameter cylinders and Stephenson link valve gear. Road numbers shown above come from the 1911 book, which lists engine numbers by class, builder, and date.


Class D10d, e 22 1/2 TBolt 30 (Locobase 15739)

Data from 1947 CP Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. See Locobase 15735 for the full description of the D10 engine design. Works numbers were 52099-52123.

Locobase offers a general view of the class in several entries. The present one features the 30-flue Schmidt superheaters with the TeeBolt header and 21"-diameter cylinders. By the time the 1944 CP MP14 equipment register was compiled, over 125 of the Vaughan-Horsey locomotives had been converted to Schmidt superheaters.

All D10s later were fitted with four arch tubes that added 29 sq ft (2.7 sq m) to the firebox heating surface, bringing it to 209 sq ft (19.4 sq m).


Class D10e, f - 22 1/2, V&H 24-Wals (Locobase 4515)

Data from 1947 CP Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 and CP 1911-24 supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. See Locobase 15735 for the full description of the D10 engine design.

Class Road numbers Builder Date Works numbers

D10e 2600-2609 MLW 1908 45594-45603

D10e 2610-2619 MLW 1908 45713-45722

D10e 2620-2632 CPR 1909

D10e/f 2633-2647 MLW 1909 46542-46556

D10e 2648-2669 CPR 1910

Notes. The last five locomotives in the 1909 Montreal batch were D10f that measured 184 sq ft (17.1 sq m) of firebox area (without arch tubes), which increased EHS to 2,830 sq ft (262.9 sq m). All D10s later were fitted with four arch tubes that added 29 sq ft (2.7 sq m) to the firebox heating surface, bringing it to 209 sq ft (19.4 sq m).

Also, all of the 2600s were renumbered in 1913-1914 by replacing the 26 with an 8 and arriving at 800-869.

Locobase offers a general view of the class in several entries. The present one features Vaughan-Horsey superheaters with 24 flues, 22 1/2"-diameter cylinders, and outside radial valve gear. Road numbers shown above come from the 1911 book, which lists engine numbers by class, builder, and date.


Class D10g - 21, V&H 24, Wals (Locobase 15736)

Data from 1947 CP Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 and CP 1911-24 supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. See Locobase 15735 for the full description of the D10 engine design.

Class Road numbers Builder Date Works numbers

D10g 2670-2690 CPR 1910

D10g 2691-2694, 2713-2733, 2749-2761

CPR 1911

D10g 2695-2712 Canadian Locomotive Company 1911 967-984

D10g 2734-2748 Montreal Locomotive Works 1911 50247-50261

D10g 2762-2811 MLW 1912 50961-51010

Notes. Also, all of the 2600s were renumbered in 1913-1914 by replacing the 26 with an 8 or a 27 with a 9 and arriving at 800-869.

D10h and j locomotives built in 1912-1913 were likely very similar:

Class Road numbers Builder Date Works numbers

D10j 962-986 MLW 1912 51096-51120

D10h 1041-1061 MLW 1912 52064-52078

D10h 1087-1111 CLC 1913 1123-1147

Locobase offers a general view of the class in several entries. The present one features Vaughan-Horsey superheaters with 24 flues and, 21"-diameter cylinders. Road numbers shown above come from the 1911 book, which lists engine numbers by class, builder, and date.

All D10s later were fitted with four arch tubes that added 29 sq ft (2.7 sq m) to the firebox heating surface, bringing it to 209 sq ft (19.4 sq m).


Class D10g/h/j 21, ""Thru-bolt"" 32 (Locobase 6555)

Data from 1947 CP Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

See Locobase 15735 for a general description of the D10 class of over 500 Ten-wheelers. As explained there, Locobase has created several entries to account for variations in superheater type, flue count, and cylinder diameter as well as later updates to the superheater installation.

This entry presents the later update that included a 32-element Schmidt superheater with the "Thru-bolt" header. Compared to the earlier Tbolt header, the "Thru-bolt" header provided a greater air space between the saturated and superheated sides of the superheater, which reduced the rapidity of heat transfer and allowed for expansion and contraction. The change usually resulted a slightly shorter distance between tube sheets.

By the time the 1944 CP MP14 equipment register was compiled, over 125 of the D10s with Vaughan-Horsey locomotives had been converted to Schmidt superheaters.


Class D10k - 21, Schmidt, TBolt 28 (Locobase 15737)

Data from 1947 CP Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. See Locobase 15735 for the full description of the D10 engine design. Works numbers were 52099-52123

Locobase offers a general view of the class in several entries. The present one features the 28-flue Schmidt superheaters with the TeeBolt header and 21"-diameter cylinders.

All D10s later were fitted with four arch tubes that added 29 sq ft (2.7 sq m) to the firebox heating surface, bringing it to 209 sq ft (19.4 sq m).


Class D11c/D10c (Locobase 10808)

Data from "Standardizing Locomotive Equipment - Canadian Pacific", American Engineer and Railroad Journal (May 1906), p. 161-165. See Locobase 15735 for the full description of the D10 engine design. Works numbers were 1426-1430 in 1905.

Other than the big fireboxes, D11s were D10s and had the same 11"(279 mm) diameter piston valves.

These camelbacks had the Wootten-type boiler that burned culm. Very few such locomotives operated outside of the anthracite coal regions, let alone the United States. In his "Writing about My First Trip as 'The Engineer' on the West Coast Railway Association's website [] (3 Dec 2004), Bill Yeats offered a terse evaluation of the idea: "...they were not very efficient nor were they very popular with their crews."

Tested for two years on lines west of Medicine Hat, Alberta their odd layout and lack of any clear advantage to offset the unusual separation of engineer and fireman led to their conversion into D10s in1907.


Class D1a (Locobase 15715)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Works numbers were 2654-2663 in October 1891.

The CPR put these Ten-wheelers into its D series to indicate the 63" mixed-traffic driver diameters. They had other differences from the B & C freighter series. The firebox sat lower, between the last two driven axles, which lengthened the locomotives' wheelbases.

353 (ex-559) was the only engine in the class to receive a superheater.

Three of the class--251, 7257, and 7254--were scrapped in 1915, the others in the 1920s except for two that were rebuilt with much different boilers and redesignated D1b; see Locobase 15716.


Class D1b (Locobase 15716)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

This pair, which originally entered the motive power list as D1a 563-564 (see Locobase 15715) and later renumbered 354 and 358, received brand-new boilers and fireboxes that had significantly higher centerlines, a few more tubes each measuring 8" (203 mm) longer, longer grates, and repositioned sand and steam domes, they were not superheated. Still, weight increased by a surprising 31,500 lb (14,288 kg).

259 was scrapped in September 1930 and 7258 in July 1933.


Class D2a (Locobase 15717)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Works numbers 1124-1129 in 1890-1892.

Later designated D2a and D3a (Locobase 15709), these two classes differed only in the provision of simple expansion in the D2a, cross-compounding in the D3a. Locobase is stuck for an answer as to why these engines were not designated D3b (Locobase 3750), except that D3bs weighed 6 tons more.


Class D2b (Locobase 15718)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. See also DeGolyer, Volume 17, p. 115. Works numbers were 12168, 12173, 12180 in August 1891; 12195, 12208-12210, 12214-12215, 12218 in September.

Satifisfying the same specification as the D2a from the Canadian Pacific's own shops, this decade of Philadelphians had shallower fireboxes and steam domes placed ahead, rather than over the firebox. They proved to be considerably heavier on the drivers than were the CPRs, in part because of a weight shift of 4,100 lb (1,860 kg) off the front trucks.

Most were retired and scrapped in the mid-1920s. According to Gene Connelly's Canadian Pacific list (also supplied by Allen Stanley), 7278 (ex-574) was sold to the Dominion Atlantic in 1916 as their 29. After its scrapping in September 1926, the DAR took another D2b (7276, ex- 571) in January 1928 and gave it number 29.


Class D2c (Locobase 15719)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

This locomotive was delivered by the CPR to the CPR in April 1889. It was later rebuilt to the D2d type shown in Locobase 15720. Still later, the 378 was rebuilt as a superheated locomotive.


Class D2d (Locobase 15720)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

These Ten-wheelers were delivered in 1889, but were built at the CPR shops for very different roles. 377 At that time, they probably had 17" x 24" cylinders and 62" drivers. 378 was one of two SM-class express passenger Ten-wheelers rolling on 75" drivers (Locobase 11253).

The 378 was later superheated; see Locobase 15719.


Class D2e (Locobase 15721)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

A Ten-wheeler originally delivered in December 1889. At that time, it probably had 17" x 24" cylinders and 62" drivers. Both were rebuilt with larger cylinders and taller drivers. Locobase can't say why the tube count is lower than similarly modified D2d shown in Locobase 15720.


Class D3a (Locobase 15709)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Works number was 1132 in May 1891.

Locobase 3750 shows the D3b completed to a simple-expansion design. This engine was a Pittsburgh cross-compound (so named for the two uneven-diameter cylinders and the particular intercepting valve design).

The 7280 was scrapped in February 1920.


Class D3c (Locobase 15722)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

This locomotive began as a D3b, later reclassified as D4m. In 1922, the CPR superheated the engine. That installation extended the 7292's career until it was scrapped in May 1929.


Class D3d, D3f, D3g (Locobase 15723)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

The CPR put a lot of effort into affirming the value of the cross-compound principle in steam locomotives. These Ten-wheelers originally belonged to the D3b class delivered in 1891. Like most of the other compounds, they used the Pittsburgh cross-compounding system that differed from other such designs in the details of its intercepting valve.

D3f began as 589, renumbered 431 in 1907 and classified D3d, then 331, then 7331.

D3g originally had 608, renumbered 432 in 1907,7332 in 1913, 1500 in 1930.


Class D3e (Locobase 15724)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

When this locomotive--then numbered 616--had entered its cross-compound phase (Locobase 15723), its update history wasn't complete. A few years later, the now-417 was updated with a typical CPR installation featuring its home-grown superheater in a new boiler and firebox.

As with several other makeovers (such as the D1b shown in Locobase 15716 and the D2c in Locobase 15719), the result was a more modern-looking locomotive with a high-pitched boiler and deep firebox riding above the axles. In the D3e's case, the upgrade proved durable. The 317 remained on the roster until scrapped in February 1935.


Class D3h, D3k (Locobase 15725)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Works numbers were 1202-1203 in June 1894, 1204-1206 in July, 1207-1208 in September, 1209 in October.

Locobase 9939 shows the first compounds to be built in Canada. They were based on this class of simple-expansion mixed-traffic Ten-wheelers produced three years earlier.

Except for the 437, which appears to have been sold to the Esquimalt & Nanaimo in 1909 or 1910, the D3h class remained on the CPR until they were scrapped in the late 1920s and early 1930s. The 437 returned from the E&N in the late 1920s and was scrapped in 1927.


Class D4a, b, c, d, e (Locobase 15681)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

Manufactured by the railroad, this group of smallish Ten-wheelers was built as Pittsburgh-type cross-compounds (Locobase 9935).

They were later converted to the two-cylinder simple engines described in the specifications.


Class D4f (Locobase 10103)

Data from "Six-Coupled Compound Engine, Canadian Pacific Ry." The Locomotive & Railway Carriage & Wagon Review, Vol III (October 1898), p. 154 and from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines, as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 21, p. 57. Baldwin works numbers 15470-15479.

Most North American roads didn't retain compound-working locomotives in their original forms for long. A look at the accompanying photograph suggests one reason: within the two sets of drivers lay four sets of Stephenson valve gear that must have been a nightmare to repair and adjust.

This class was rebuilt to a 19" x 24" simple-expansion layout in 1905 (see Locobase 8057).

NB: The direct heating surface (including the firebox heating surface) is an estimate calculated by subtracting the calculated tube heating surface from the reported total evaporative heating surface.


Class D4f (Locobase 8057)

Data from CN to 1953 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 and CP 1911-1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

After converting the thirteen Vauclain compounds the railway bought in 1897 (Locobase 10103) to simple-expansion engines in 1905-1906, the CP operated each one for at least two more decades.

Two - 385 and 387 -- were sold to the Dominion Atlantic in 1923; four more--379, 380, 382, 384--followed in 1925. And in October and November 1927, the CPR sold 381 & 386 to the Quebec, Montreal & Southern, which entered the Canadian National's corporate fold in 1929. At that point, the pair was renumbered 1453-1454.

The last four to be scrapped--380, 382-384--went to the ferro-knacker's in July 1933.


Class D4g (Locobase 4491)

Data from 1947 CP Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Montreal works numbers were 50542-50465, 51075-51082 in 1912. The CPR's Angus Shops delivered 2425-2436 in 1912; 437-459, 482-483 in 1913; 484-492 in 1914; 417-424 in February-May 1915.

Produced by Canadian Pacific and Montreal Loco Works over three years. Built and quite suitable for branch line service throughout the CPR. Featured a slender, high-pitched boiler, piston valves. 461-465 were converted to oil-burning.

Four of the locomotives--417, 418, 419, and 421--went to subsidiary Quebec, Montreal & Southern in 1924. Eight years later, they returned to the CPR's roster. They continued to serve commuter trains into the 1950s.

The 460 was sent to the Esquimalt & Nanaimo in January 1922. She was followed in September 1930 by the 461-463. All had the 4 lopped off their road numbers. 460 returned to the CPR in January 1936. 461-463 retraced their path in March 1937. 462 was scrapped in September 1939, 461 in April 1943, 460 in February 1949, and 463 in March 1953.


Class D5a (Locobase 15727)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Works numbers were 1239-1241 in 1897.

These simple-expansion engines were the sisters of the cross-compounds shown in Locobase 15726 and, like those engines, duplicated the design of the C2a (Locobase 15714, built by the CPR in the same year), except for mounting 62" drivers. All three were leased to the Esquimalt & Nanaimo.


Class D6a - compound (Locobase 9441)

Data from "Ten-wheel Engine for the Canadian Pacific", Railway and Locomotive Engineering, Volume 15, No. 10 (October 1902), pp. 425-426. See also Angus Sinclair, Twentieth Century Locomotives (New York: Railway and Locomotive Engineering, 1904), pp.576-578. 26747-26766 in November 1902.

These were variants of the D6a design (Locobase 9765) that entered service in 1902-1904. The trio were cross-compounds with taller drivers. Sinclair commented in 1902 that "These engines represent the latest practice in the design of heavy 10-wheel power, and have what may, without flattery, be called a most pleasing appearance."

The indirect valve motion admitted steam through piston valves for the HP cylinders, slide valves for the LP jugs.


Class D6a - superheated (Locobase 2658)

Data from CP 2 - 1947 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. See also Bill Yeats, writing on the West Coast Railway Association website ([]).

Locobase 9765 gives the details of this design in its original saturated- boiler incarnation.

The CP Locomotive Diagram book shows two subclasses when they were superheated: the D6a shown here and the D6bd with a shorter boiler in Locobase 9442..

Twelve of the twenty rebuilt engines were sent to the Dominion Atlantic


Class D6b/D6d - later configuration (Locobase 9442)

Data from the CP 2 - 1947 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange and the CP 1911-24 diagram book sent later in August 2013.

After the delivery of the two sets of foreign Ten-wheeler compounds, the CPR began exploring the use of superheat in a big way. All but one of the forty 1903 engines were updated using the tube-flue configuration shown in this entry. The 1947 diagram book also shows that 13 sq ft (1.2 sq m) of arch tube contributed to direct heating surface area as well.

Locobase can't account for the 60 sq ft (5.55 sq m) drop in superheater area from the 1911 diagram to the 1947 diagram. Was it a change in the superheater elements themselves or simply a revision in how such areas were calculated?


Class D6b/D6d - superheated (Locobase 15731)

Data from the CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.


Class D6c - superheated (Locobase 15730)

Data from the CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

Locobase doesn't know when this one engine from the North British Locomotive order of 1903 was superheated, but would hazard a guess that it was soon after the class arrived on the CPR.


Class D8a/D12a (Locobase 15734)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Works numbers were 5740 in May 1902 and 5741-5743 in June.

This quartet of relatively large Ten-wheelers was delivered in 1902 as D8a. Page 138 of the Bulletin 167 of the Railroad & Locomotive Historical Society (a full listing of all Rogers production) shows the class with 61" drivers. Locobase hasn't unearthed any information on why the designation changed to D12a. The latter's diagram shows a burly, large-boilered engine with a high axle loading for mixed-traffic CPR 4-6-0s.

None was superheated and the class was retired and scrapped in May 1928 (1998) and June (1996-1997, 1999).


Class D9b (Locobase 5352)

Data from table in July 1904 American Engineer and Railroad Journal (which referred back to "Compound Locomotive with Superheater," AERJ, Volume 77, No 9 (September 1903, pp. 317-319). Works number was 28374 in November 1903.

Locobase 13511 describes the basic CP compound class from which the engine discussed in the current entry was taken. Drury (1993) explains that these locomotives combined a cross-compound cylinder arrangement with superintendent Henry Vaughn's own design of superheater (the Horsey-Vaughn - more usually termed "Vaughan-Horsey").

The September 1903 AERJ article describes in much greater detail the revolution this test would come to represent in North American railroading. He first notes that an existing locomotive was converted for tests beginning in June 1901. The locomotive described is one of the series of compounds then (1903) being built by Schenectady.

It is clear from the narrative that the author believes his audience will be mostly unfamiliar with Schmidt's smoketube superheater. The author carefully distinguishes between the smokebox superheaters already being tried (and promoted heavily over the next few years by Baldwin in particular), and the Schmidt system. As the writer's explanation nicely summarizes the Schmidt Type A design, Locobase quotes from it at length:

"Instead of placing the superheater tubes in the smokebox they are taken from a header casting at the front end of the dry pipe and looped back through twenty-two 5-in. tubes toward the firebox. The superheater tubes, which are 1 1/4 ins. in diameter outside and 15-16 in. inside, reach within 32 ins. of the firebox ends of the large tubes but are not exposed to the direct neat of the firebox. Return bends at the ends of the superheater tubes take the superheated steam forward again to the header, which is partitioned off to separate the hot from the cooler steam. From here the branch pipes take the superheated steam to the cylinders ...The large tubes are swaged down at the back ends and beaded in the usual manner. Each large tube contains two loops of the smaller tubes, which are braced by feet cast upon the return bends at the back ends. At the header casting the loops are removably connected so that they may be easily taken down for examination and repairs. The superheater pipes are solid drawn steel tubes, the amount of heating surface thus provided being 289.5 sq. ft."

The author then describes the workings of the header.

"A plate partition separates the main portion of the smoke box from the space containing the superheater header and the tube ends. A flat damper valve connects the spaces and this valve is opened by the steam pressure in the steam pipes acting through a small cylinder shown on the side of the smokebox. When the throttle is open this valve is also open and It closed by action of a counterweight when the throttle is closed. With this device the superheater tubes cannot become highly heated when steam is not passing through them and thus the greatest danger of burnt tubes is avoided. It will be noted that with this construction the smokebox is necessarily long to receive the superheater header, but that its diameter is not enlarged as was required with the earlier construction of smokebox superheater. The header takes the superheater tubes in groups of four."

According to Drury, adding the superheater to a compound soon showed the CP that one could dispense with the complexity of the compound and the 500-locomotive D10 class soon appeared, simpled and superheated. This class also was modified as simple-expansion engines.

NB: The superheater's novelty in North America at the time perhaps explains why the AERJ's tables (both in July 1904 and in June 1906) don't count the 289.5 sq ft of superheater in the overall heating surface total of 2,483.17 sq ft. Locobase has added the superheater value into the combined heating surface.

Soon the 1300 was retrofitted with a larger Vaughn & Horsey superheater and joined the other compounds in class D9c; see Locobase 15679.


Class D9c (Locobase 15679)

Data from CP 1911-1924 locomotive diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

Locobase 13511 shows this class of Ten-wheeler as they appeared when delivered in 1903 as cross-compounds. Locobase 5352 gives a full description of the thinking behind delivering the last in the class with a Vaughan-Horsey superheater.

Vaughan was an avid supporter of the move to superheating steam locomotives, so it didn't take him long to apply the concept to this set of mixed-traffic engines. He was still feeling his way around the proper proportions of superheat and boiler size, so these D9s had relatively small superheater areas as a ratio of total heating surface area.


Class E2a/E2b (Locobase 15744)

Data from CP 1911-24 supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

This class of passenger Ten-wheelers was rebuilt with 18" x 24" cylinders in 1912-1913. They may also have been superheated as E2c, which appears in Locobase 15745.


Class E2c (Locobase 15745)

Data from CP 1911-24 supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

In the CP 1911 diagram book, the two locomotives credited with this superheater makeover were both delivered as E2b. The 809 bore number 269 in 1906, when it was renumbered and Connelly shows it to have been produced slightly earlier than the E2a and E2b shown in Locobase 15744.

There was more to this update than installing a superheater. The boiler appears to have been new as was the firebox, which now probably included arch tubes. The E2c also weighed substantially more.

It appears that both locomotives were scrapped before 1930.


Class E2d (Locobase 15746)

Data from CP 1911-24 supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

Following the E2a into service, this quintet of passenger Ten-wheelers had smaller boilers and less cylinder volume.

813-814 were sold to the Kingston & Pembroke in 1910 as their 1 and 2. The "Kick and Push" main line ran almost due north from the port city of Kingston to Renfrew, 103.6 miles (166.8 km) away. (Renfrew is due west of Ottawa and southwest of Pembroke, which the K&P never quite attained.)

Superheating the E2d took two forms. See Locobase 15747 for the E2e and 15748 for the E1f.


Class E2e/E1e (Locobase 15747)

Data from CP 1911-24 supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

Locobase 15746 shows the original saturated-boiler E2d delivered in 1891. A later upgrade remade the class two different ways. It appears that the E2e involved a limited makeover confined chiefly to removing about a third of the small tubes and replacing them with the 18 flues that held the superheater elements.

The 2006 was later placed in class E1e. It was scrapped in May 1928.


Class E2f/E1f (Locobase 15748)

Data from CP 1911-24 supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

Rebuilding the 815 encompassed a much more substantial revision than was applied to sister E2d locomotive 812 (Locobase 15747). The firebox now had arch tubes, the boiler's shape changed dramatically, and weight increased by several tons.


Class E3a - smooth tubes (Locobase 15749)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

Locobase 3749 shows the original trio as delivered in 1893 with large-diameter, internally finned Serve tubes. As popular as they proved to be in France, the 2.5" diameter small tube didn't attract many users in North America.

Sometime later the boilers were modified with the removal of those tubes and the installation of more, smaller-diameter tubes. At the same time, they replaced the inside link motion with the outside radial valve gear.

They joined seven new engines built to the same specifications except for the inclusion of a Vaughan & Horsey superheater.

All were scrapped at the Angus shops in March and April 1943.


Class E4d (Locobase 15753)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

The makeover of fourteen of the saturated E4s (Locobases 15750-15752) involved the adoption of a brand new boiler. The most obvious difference was the deletion of 132 small tubes to make room for 24 large flues. Another signficant result was the better distribution of axle loading across three driving sets.

The first of the fourteen superheated engines was 843, which was modified in March 1911.

Locobase suspects that the three E4e that were updated in 1922-1926 went through a similar program.

The first four of the superheated E4s were scrapped in September 1930. 2040 and 2043 closed out the class at the ferro-knacker's in June 1938.


Class E5d, e, h - superheated (Locobase 4507)

Data from 1947 CP Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

These engines were originally built by the CPR shops (E-5d) and by builders in Glasgow, Scotland (see Locobases 15757-15759).

They remained on the CPR into the 1930s with a few--2074, 2075 (in January), 2077, 2088, 2095, 2098 held on the roster until February 1941.


Class E5f/g (Locobase 6554)

Data from 1947 CP Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

Locobase 15756 shows the big Schenectady Ten-wheelers that completed the E5 class. When the class was superheated as presented in the specification, the result included a slightly larger superheat ratio than many of the other E5 subgoups. (Firebox heating surface includes 11 sq ft of arch tubes.)


Class SM (Locobase 11253)

Data from "Ten-Wheel Locomotive, Canadian Pacific Ry.", Engineering News (30 August 1890), p. 185.

Engineering News (with a nod toward Engineering Journal of London) notes that this was a design of the recently deceased F R F Brown, who had been Mechanical Superintendent of the CPR. The engine was built in the CPR's Montreal shops.

Apparently Brown concluded that the railway needed express passenger engines and offered this prototype which balanced a relatively small cylinder volume with a relatively tall driver diameter. The author declared that the engine's wheelbase was short for a mainline 4-6-0. He also noted that the short stroke and tall drivers meant a low piston speed at (e.g.) 80 mph (129 km/h).

The two engines in this class were later renumbered 378-379 and rebuilt with 18" x 24" cylinders and 63" drivers as D2d (378) and D2e (379).


Class SO/C1b (Locobase 15708)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Works numbers 395-396 in 1890 and 423-432 in 1891-1892.

Low-drivered, relatively light Ten-wheelers that mostly served the Canadian Pacific until they were scrapped over a long period from 1917 to 1933. Three went to the Dominion Atlantic, however, as their 34-36; 310 was purchased in November 1910 and 319-320 in September 1911.


Class SR/D3b (Locobase 3750)

Data supplied by Bill Hallett for Bryan Attewell ([])'s Steam locomotive simulator (April 2000), supplemented by CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

Compared to the SN, the SRs had smaller drivers, slightly smaller cylinders, but more weight on the drivers. They probably operated in mixed-traffic service on branch lines.


Class SR2/D3j (Locobase 9939)

Data from "First Compound Locomotive Built in Canada", Locomotive Engineering, Vol X, No 8 (August 1897), p. 609-610. Works numbers were 1221-1222 in 1897.

This was the first compound locomotives to be built in Canada. It was built near the end of a long run of Ten-wheelers of modest size.

In addition to adopting the Pittsburgh system of cross-compounding (which featured a Colvin starting valve to permit the admission of live steam to both cylinders), the locomotive featured what was described by the reporter as an odd form of smokebox arrangement. In addition to a baffle plate placed in front of the exhaust pipe, two "lift pipes" spanned the relatively great distance between the top of the nozzle and the opening to the exhaust pipe. The lower of these measured 10" (254 mm) in diameter, the upper pipe 13".

According to LE, Atkinson commented that "this arrangement of smoke-stack ...works very well and enables them to keep the smoke-box clear of cinders without spark hopper or side hole, and at the same time the engine throws fewer sparks than ever they had before, and the steaming qualities are extremely satisfactory, even with fine coal."


Class SR2/D4a, D4b, D4c, D4d (Locobase 9935)

Data from "Canadian Pacific Ten-Wheeler", Locomotive Engineering, Vol XI, No 11 (November 1898), p. 527. Works numbers were 1223-1229 (D4a), 1242-1251 (D4b), 1254 (D4c), 1255-1263 (D4d) in 1897.

The article says that compounding was achieved through the Pittsburgh system. The firebox was of the square-shouldered Belpaire type. Compared to most other Ten-wheelers in North America, this was a relatively small locomotive. Yet the article maintains the class was intended for "fast heavy passenger service."

All were later converted to simple-expansion locomotives; see Locobase 15681.


Class ST 12 / D6b (Locobase 15729)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Works numbers were 16034-16053 in November-December 1903.

Locobase 10373 features the twenty Saxon Machine Works built to the same design for the CPR in the same year. British and German railway journalists awaited the outcome of their entries into service breathlessly, hoping to see one of the countries emerge clearly superior. The British writers also saw the NBL order as a chance to confirm the "hitherto admitted" superiority of British locomotives over the American-Canadian designs already in widespread use.


Class ST 12 / D6d (Locobase 10373)

Data from "Ten-Wheeled Compound Locomotive, Canadian Pacific Railway." The Locomotive Magazine, Volume IX (26 September 1903), p. 181-182. Works numbers were 2827-2846 in November 1903 to April 1904.

These were balanced compounds with the HP cylinders inside, LP outside. HP cylinders received their steam through piston valves, LP through slide valves.

Reclassified as D6d in 1908, the class was converted to simple-expansion (20" x 26") in 1913 and superheated; see Locobase


Class ST11/D9a (Locobase 13511)

Data from table in H H Vaughan, "Superheated Steam on the Canadian Pacific Railway", New York Railroad Club Official Proceedings, Volume 16, No. 6 (May 1906), p.228-270. Works numbers were 28337-28361 in July 1903 and 28362-23373 in August.

One of the class would be superheated using the Schmidt superheater design; see Locobase . See Locobase 5352 for a full description of the installation. When the rest of this cross-compound class of Ten-wheelers followed suit (most likely when they were converted to simple expansion as well), their dimensions came out a little differently.

See Locobase 15679 for the result.


Class ST12 // D6a (Locobase 9765)

Data from Angus Sinclair, Railway and Locomotive Engineering, Vol XV, No 8 (August 1902), p. 340 and "New English Built Engines of American Design for the Canadian Pacific Ry," The Locomotive Magazine, Vol VIII (17 Jan 1903), p. 48. See also Bill Yeats, writing on the West Coast Railway Association website ([]).

Locobase initially drew a frustrating blank about this design, which built to the designs of superintendent of rolling stock E A Williams at the CP's Montreal shops. Sinclair's writeup tells us that twelve were built in the class and that the last three were Pittsburgh (Locomotive Works)-type compounds. The Locomotive Magazine article dissolves the fog by telling us that the CPR's Angus Works built the first six, but that Glasgow's Neilson, Reid (then in the process of forming North British Locomotive Company) supplied another 32 in batches of 12 (Neilson works 6339-6350) and 20 (works numbers 15868-15687). Neilson's locomotives would weigh 4 cwt (448 lb) more than the CPR's own.

Would these have been better described by LM as "Engines of North American Design ..."? The original title seems rather cavalierly to dismiss the Canadian railway's independence.

The main drivers (the second coupled axle) were not flanged. 12" (305 mm) diameter piston valves were sizable enough for good steam admission. At 10 mph, Sinclair notes, the class was rated at 4,100 tons behind the tender. (Given that these were passenger-train engines, that might not have been the most useful measure of power.). O S Nock (Railways of the World in Colour, Volume III - Railways at the Turn of the Century, plate 83) describes these engines as powerful and "free-running,".

Nock attributes their performance among other things to piston valves 12" diameter when the going value would have been 8-9". They had coned boilers and a North American cab and looked very much like other CP engines.

Sinclair devotes a paragraph on what was certainly a welcome innovation in cab design. In the center of the cab window "... may be noticed a little glass shutter or wind guard, which is very popular with the men on the road. It consists of a light frame containing a pane of glass perhaps 4 or 5 ins. wide. This frame folds forward, flat against the cab window when not in use, but when in service it is drawn back and held by a small rod at right angles to the cab window. This enables the engineer or fireman to put head outside the cab, and sheltered behind this face guard, to see clearly ahead. It is very useful in rainy, snowy or stormy weather. It resembles the wooden wind guard used by the Pullman Car Co., for the convenience of patrons who desire to open the window but who do not wish to experience a violent draught of air."

A class that included some of the few British-built locomotives on a Canadian railroad,


Class ST13/E5f (Locobase 15759)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Works numbers were 28566-28577 in June 1903.

From across the border came the largest of the E5 series. The longer tubes meant a longer boiler and a greater spread of wheelbases. Three more E5g locomotives preceded the twelve simple-expansion engines in June 1902 (works numbers 26119-26121). They were cross-compounds with one 22" HP and one 35" LP cylinder.


Class ST2/E3a (Locobase 3749)

Data supplied by Bill Hallett for Bryan Attewell ([])'s Steam locomotive simulator (April 2000), revised and supplemented by

data from M Grille & MH Falconnette, Les Chemins de Fer a L'Exposition de Chicago, (Paris, France: E Bernard et Cie, 1894), p 24. Works numbers were 1189 in March 1893, 1195-1196 in July.

Hallett's data differs slightly from the 1893 report and Locobase finds that he was describing a variant with most of the essential data the same, but fitted with one unusual feature (for North American-built locomotives at least). These were the Serve tubes with their internal fins. Grille & Falconnette consider these locomotives "...so light, so delicate"; thus their success certainly was not assured. But they salute their performance on difficult lines under the weight of winter with its strains brought on by an abundance of snow and temperatures as low as 40 below (Celsius, Locobase believes).

As Locobase had suspected, an upgrade to the boiler replaced the Serve tubes with smooth tubes; see Locobase 15749.


Class ST3/E4a (Locobase 15750)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Works numbers were 1279-1283 in April 1899, 1284 in May.

Passenger Ten-wheelers that came out of the shops in the last year of the 19th Century, the E4s appeared in three flavors: 19" and 20" simple (Locobase 15751), and a compound expansion variant (Locobase 15752). Each has its own entry and this is the sextet that was the most like the preceding 70" 4-6-0s in cylinder volume.

By 1927, only 2027 still used a saturated boiler; it was scrapped in November 1929. The others would be superheated as Class E4d or E4e.


Class ST3/E4b (Locobase 15751)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Works numbers were 1298 in April 1899, 1299-1301 in November, 1301-1303 in December, and 1323 in December, 1324-1325 in March 1900, and 1326-1328 in April.

Produced at the same time as the 19" E4a (Locobase 15750), these dozen Passenger Ten-wheelers had larger cylinders that conferred some more tractive effort at very little cost in weight increase.

By 1927, only four--2031, 2037, 2039, and 2042--would still have saturated boilers. They were scrapped in numerical order in October (2), November (1), and December (1) 1929. The others were superheated as Class E4d; see Locobase 15753.


Class ST3/E4c (Locobase 15752)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Works numbers were 1329 in May 1900, 1330-1331 in June, and 1332 in July.

The last four E4s emerged from the CPR's shops as Pittsburgh cross-compounds, a type of double-expansion favored by the CPR for several years.

All four would be superheated as Class E4d.


Class ST5 - compound (Locobase 15755)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Works numbers were 1351-1353 in April 1902.

In the large class of E5 passenger Ten-wheelers, only three were delivered as Pittsburgh cross-compounds. One suspects that the struggle to make compounding work on the CPR was growing tougher and tougher as the trains got heavier and heavier. More than that was HH Vaughan's decision to turn to superheating for solutions to power and efficiency shortcomings.

All three would soon be superheated along with three new engines; see Locobase 15756.


Class ST5/E5a (Locobase 15754)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. See also "Canadian Ten-wheeler", Railway & Locomotive Engineering, Vol 15, No 8 (August 1902), p.340. Works numbers were 1345-1347 in January 1902, 1348-1349 in February, 1350 in March.

As the mainline passenger trains got longer and heavier, the CPR stayed with its trusted Ten-wheeler layout but enlarged the boiler by almost 30%. Weight grew, too, perhaps too much so given the resulting factor of adhesion of more than 5.4.

The R&LE report devoted a lot of space to the special cab window feature: "It consists of a light frame containing a pane of glass perhaps 4 or 5 ins. wide. This frame folds forward, fiat against the cab window when not in use, but when in service it is drawn back and held by a small rod at right angles to the cab window. This enables the engineer or fireman to put head outside the cab, and sheltered behind this face guard, to see clearly ahead. It is very useful in rainy, snowy or stormy weather."

The article also notes the "specialty" suppliers as follows:

Special equipment W. A. B. driver and" train brakes, etc.

Commingler system of heating,

Pyle-Nation electric headlights,

Washburn flexible pilot coupler,

Tower tender coupler,

three 2 1/2" "Star" safety valves,

nickel steel piston rods from Bethlehem Iron Co.

Magnesia sectional block lagging,

Crosby steam gauge,

one Michigan and one Detroit lubricator,

Leach sand traps,

Gollmar bell ringer,

two No. 10 Gresham & Craven Automatic Restarting Injectors,

steel cab,

hopper tender,

spring buffer between engine and tender.

Also noted were all of the components made of cast steel: Motion radius links, rocker arms and boxes, crossheads, driving axle boxes, expansion brackets, eccentric straps, spring hanger brackets, dome ring and cover and all driving wheel centers. The writer didn't say if these were cast by the CPR shops or supplied to them.

All would be superheated.


Class ST6/E5c (Locobase 15756)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Works numbers were 1354-1355 in May 1902, 1356 in June.

H H Vaughan was an early North American adopter of superheating after being convinced that it would yield exceptional benefits. The first of the E5s to be delivered with superheaters were the three E5c. The Pittsburgh cross-compounds that had once seemed a possible answer to the same questions were converted to the superheated layout before very long.

The result was satisfying enough to the CPR to retain all six in service into the late 1930s and early 1940s.


Class ST7/E5d (Locobase 15757)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. CPR works numbers were 1354-1368 from May 1902 to February 1903.

Continuing the line of 70" passenger Ten-wheelers, the CPR produced this batch with a slightly shorter firebox. A physical difference was the shape of the steam dome.

All were superheated; see Locobase 15759.


Class ST7/E5e (Locobase 15758)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. All 32 locomotives came from the same works. The first twelve were ordered from Neilson & Company of Glasgow and had works numbers 6339-6350. Then Neilson was combined with Sharp, Stewart and Dubs of the same city to form the North British Locomotive Company. So, in the same way as the Alco components combined production histories, the next twenty engines in this order had North British works numbers 15868-15887 (formerly 6417-6436).

The order came from the CPR to flesh out the E5 Ten-wheelers,.

All were superheated; see Locobase 15759.


Class SV2/D5b (Locobase 15726)

Data from CP 1911-24 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Works numbers were 1236-1238 in 1897.

These Pittsburgh-design cross-compounds immediately followed the design of the C2a (Locobase 15714, built by the CPR in the same year), but rolled on 62" drivers.

All three were later leased to the Esquimalt & Nanaimo. Connelly's Canadian Pacific roster says the trio was scrapped in August 1929.

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassC1a-superheatedC1cC1dC1eC1f
Locobase ID15,707 15,710 15,711 15,712 15,713
RailroadCanadian Pacific (CPR)Intercolonial Coal Mining Company (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)
CountryCanadaCanadaCanadaCanadaCanada
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class24116
Road Numbers300, 302/230-231496,493-495/532/326/224533/327/225465-470
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built4116
BuilderCPRRhode IslandRogersRogersCPR
Year19111894189718961890
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)11.83 / 3.6111.75 / 3.5811.83 / 3.61
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)21.29 / 6.4922.25 / 6.7821.48 / 6.55
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.56 0.53 0.55
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)48.17 / 14.6848.08 / 14.6548.06 / 14.65
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)36,000 / 16,32936,000 / 16,329
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)102,000 / 46,26688,000 / 39,91693,000 / 42,18493,000 / 42,18486,000 / 39,009
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)126,000 / 57,153109,500 / 49,668118,000 / 53,524118,000 / 53,524109,000 / 49,442
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)94,000 / 42,638850,000 / 385,55494,000 / 42,638
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)220,000 / 99,791968,000 / 439,078203,000 / 92,080
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)4800 / 18.183480 / 13.184020 / 15.233600 / 13.644800 / 18.18
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)11 / 10 9.90 / 9 9.90 / 911 / 1011 / 10
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)57 / 28.5049 / 24.5052 / 2652 / 2648 / 24
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)58 / 147358 / 147358 / 147358 / 147358 / 1473
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)180 / 12.40160 / 11180 / 12.40180 / 12.40180 / 12.40
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)18" x 24" / 457x61018" x 24" / 457x61018" x 24" / 457x61020" x 24" / 508x610 (1)18" x 24" / 457x610
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)30" x 24" / 762x610 (1)
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)20,513 / 9304.5518,233 / 8270.3620,513 / 9304.5517,532 / 7952.3920,513 / 9304.55
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.97 4.83 4.53 5.30 4.19
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)152 / 14.12132 / 12.26160 / 14.86160 / 14.86125 / 11.61
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)28.50 / 2.6519.50 / 1.8123.50 / 2.1823.50 / 2.1828.60 / 2.66
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)996 / 92.531547 / 143.721621 / 150.591625 / 150.971305 / 121.24
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)229 / 21.27
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1225 / 113.801547 / 143.721621 / 150.591625 / 150.971305 / 121.24
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume140.91218.86229.32372.42184.62
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation51303120423042305148
Same as above plus superheater percentage61053120423042305148
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area32,55821,12028,80028,80022,500
Power L193964829596042984751
Power MT609.25362.94423.86305.66365.38

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassC2aD10a, b, c -21, V&H, 22, linkD10b 21, TBolt 30D10d - 22 1/2, V&H 24, linkD10d, e 22 1/2 TBolt 30
Locobase ID15,714 15,735 15,738 15,740 15,739
RailroadCanadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)
CountryCanadaCanadaCanadaCanadaCanada
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class311273
Road Numbers340-342670-781600-669, 782-784
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built311273
BuilderCPRCanadian Locomotive CoCPRseveralCPR
Year189719051907
Valve GearStephensonStephensonWalschaertStephensonWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)13.42 / 4.0914.83 / 4.5214.83 / 4.5214.83 / 4.5214.83 / 4.52
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)23.35 / 7.1226.08 / 7.9526.08 / 7.9526.08 / 7.9526.08 / 7.95
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.57 0.57 0.57 0.57 0.57
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)49.10 / 14.9756.37 / 17.1855.15 / 16.8156.37 / 17.1855.15 / 16.81
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)49,000
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)110,000 / 49,895141,000 / 63,957156,000 / 70,760156,000 / 70,760156,000 / 70,760
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)139,000 / 63,049190,000 / 86,183205,000 / 92,987205,000 / 92,987205,000 / 92,987
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)90,000 / 40,823127,000 / 57,606149,000 / 67,585149,000 / 67,585149,000 / 67,585
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)229,000 / 103,872317,000 / 143,789354,000 / 160,572354,000 / 160,572354,000 / 160,572
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)3840 / 14.556000 / 22.736000 / 22.736000 / 22.736000 / 22.73
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)11 / 1013.20 / 1213.20 / 1212 / 10.9013.20 / 12
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)61 / 30.5078 / 3987 / 43.5087 / 43.5087 / 43.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)58 / 147363 / 160063 / 160063 / 160063 / 1600
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)200 / 13.80200 / 13.80200 / 13.80180 / 12.40180 / 12.40
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)20" x 24" / 508x610 (1)21" x 28" / 533x71121" x 28" / 533x71122.5" x 28" / 572x71122.5" x 28" / 572x711
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)30" x 24" / 762x610 (1)
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)19,480 / 8835.9933,320 / 15113.7233,320 / 15113.7234,425 / 15614.9434,425 / 15614.94
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 5.65 4.23 4.68 4.53 4.53
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)143 / 13.29180 / 19.42209 / 19.42180 / 19.42209 / 19.42
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)32 / 2.9749 / 4.5549 / 4.5549 / 4.5549 / 4.55
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1593 / 147.992413 / 224.172309 / 214.512418 / 225.282309 / 214.51
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)374 / 34.75472 / 43.85408 / 37.92472 / 43.85
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1593 / 147.992787 / 258.922781 / 258.362826 / 263.202781 / 258.36
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume365.09214.97205.71187.65179.19
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation64009800980088208820
Same as above plus superheater percentage640011,07411,46610,05510,319
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area28,60040,68048,90636,93644,015
Power L1454512,49614,22210,25311,150
Power MT273.27586.15602.96434.69472.72

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassD10e, f - 22 1/2, V&H 24-WalsD10g - 21, V&H 24, WalsD10g/h/j 21, ""Thru-bolt"" 32D10k - 21, Schmidt, TBolt 28D11c/D10c
Locobase ID4515 15,736 6555 15,737 10,808
RailroadCanadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)
CountryCanadaCanadaCanadaCanadaCanada
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class102255
Road Numbers2600-2669/800-8692670-2761600-11111062-1086780-784
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built102255
BuilderseveralseveralCPRAlco-SchenectadyCPR
Year1908191019121906
Valve GearWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)14.83 / 4.5214.83 / 4.5214.83 / 4.5214.83 / 4.5214.83 / 4.52
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)26.08 / 7.9526.08 / 7.9526.08 / 7.9526.08 / 7.9526.08 / 7.95
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.57 0.57 0.57 0.57 0.57
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)56.37 / 17.1856.37 / 17.1856.37 / 17.1855.15 / 16.8152.94 / 16.14
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)49,000
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)156,000 / 70,760149,000 / 67,585156,000 / 70,760156,000 / 70,760141,000 / 63,957
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)205,000 / 92,987177,000 / 80,286205,000 / 92,987205,000 / 92,987192,000 / 87,090
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)149,000 / 67,585133,000 / 60,328149,000 / 67,585149,000 / 67,585128,700 / 58,377
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)354,000 / 160,572310,000 / 140,614354,000 / 160,572354,000 / 160,572320,700 / 145,467
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)6000 / 22.736000 / 22.736000 / 22.736000 / 22.735000 / 18.94
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)12 / 10.9013.20 / 1212 / 10.9013.20 / 1210 / 9.10
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)87 / 43.5083 / 41.5087 / 43.5087 / 43.5078 / 39
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)63 / 160063 / 160063 / 160063 / 160063 / 1600
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)180 / 12.40200 / 13.80200 / 13.80200 / 13.80200 / 13.80
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)22.5" x 28" / 572x71121" x 28" / 533x71121" x 28" / 533x71121" x 28" / 533x71121" x 28" / 533x711
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)34,425 / 15614.9433,320 / 15113.7233,320 / 15113.7233,320 / 15113.7233,320 / 15113.72
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.53 4.47 4.68 4.68 4.23
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)180 / 19.42180 / 16.72209 / 19.42209 / 19.42188 / 17.47
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)49 / 4.5549 / 4.5549 / 4.5549 / 4.5576.25 / 7.09
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)2418 / 225.282418 / 224.642231 / 207.342365 / 219.712313 / 214.96
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)408 / 37.92408 / 37.90488 / 45.35572 / 53.14307 / 28.53
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)2826 / 263.202826 / 262.542719 / 252.692937 / 272.852620 / 243.49
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume187.65215.42198.76210.70206.06
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation882098009800980015,250
Same as above plus superheater percentage10,05511,17211,56411,66217,080
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area36,93641,04049,32449,74242,112
Power L110,25313,07714,34616,01111,255
Power MT434.69580.47608.22678.81527.94

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassD1aD1bD2aD2bD2c
Locobase ID15,715 15,716 15,717 15,718 15,719
RailroadCanadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)
CountryCanadaCanadaCanadaCanadaCanada
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class10106101
Road Numbers556-565/350-359/560, 564/354, 358/258, 259/7258471-476566-575456/378/278/268
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built1010610
BuilderRhode IslandCPRCPRBurnham, Williams & CoCPR
Year18911909189018901909
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)14.67 / 4.4714.67 / 4.4711.83 / 3.6111.83 / 3.6113.25 / 4.04
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)24.86 / 7.5824.74 / 7.5421.48 / 6.5521.48 / 6.5522.92 / 6.99
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.59 0.59 0.55 0.55 0.58
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)47.24 / 14.4047.08 / 14.3547.77 / 14.5647.77 / 14.5648.54 / 14.79
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)26,284 / 11,92227,300 / 12,38335,000 / 15,876
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)73,500 / 33,339103,000 / 46,72081,900 / 37,14992,000 / 41,731101,000 / 45,813
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)103,500 / 46,947135,000 / 61,235106,000 / 48,081112,000 / 50,802133,000 / 60,328
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)93,000 / 42,18493,000 / 42,184110,000 / 49,895
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)199,000 / 90,265205,000 / 92,986243,000 / 110,223
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)3600 / 13.643600 / 13.644800 / 18.184800 / 18.184800 / 18.18
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)11 / 1011 / 1011 / 1011 / 1011 / 10
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)41 / 20.5057 / 28.5046 / 2351 / 25.5056 / 28
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)63 / 160063 / 160062 / 157562 / 157563 / 1600
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)160 / 11180 / 12.40180 / 12.40175 / 12.10180 / 12.40
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)18" x 24" / 457x61018" x 24" / 457x61018" x 24" / 457x61018" x 24" / 457x61018" x 24" / 457x610
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)16,786 / 7614.0118,885 / 8566.1019,189 / 8703.9918,656 / 8462.2318,885 / 8566.10
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.38 5.45 4.27 4.93 5.35
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)132 / 12.26152 / 14.12125 / 11.61114 / 10.59152 / 14.12
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)19 / 1.7728.60 / 2.6623.40 / 2.1723.20 / 2.1628.60 / 2.66
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1432 / 133.041544 / 143.441291 / 119.941291 / 119.941100 / 102.19
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)260 / 24.15
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1432 / 133.041544 / 143.441291 / 119.941291 / 119.941360 / 126.34
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume202.59218.43182.64182.64155.62
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation30405148421240605148
Same as above plus superheater percentage30405148421240606126
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area21,12027,36022,50019,95032,558
Power L1497261605042476111,230
Power MT447.40395.55407.17342.27735.38

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassD2dD2eD3aD3cD3d, D3f, D3g
Locobase ID15,720 15,721 15,709 15,722 15,723
RailroadCanadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)
CountryCanadaCanadaCanadaCanadaCanada
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class211110
Road Numbers377-378459/379/279/269534/380/7280548/393/392/292/27927313-7316, 7327-7332
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built1
BuilderCPRCPRCPRCPRCPR
Year18901922
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)13.25 / 4.0413.25 / 4.0411.83 / 3.6111.83 / 3.6111.83 / 3.61
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)22.83 / 6.9622.83 / 6.9621.48 / 6.5521.29 / 6.4921.81 / 6.65
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.58 0.58 0.55 0.56 0.54
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)48.33 / 14.7348.33 / 14.7348.06 / 14.6548.17 / 14.6848.36 / 14.74
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)33,500 / 15,19536,000 / 16,329
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)82,000 / 37,19590,000 / 40,82394,752 / 42,979102,000 / 46,26696,000 / 43,545
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)106,000 / 48,081110,000 / 49,895120,000126,000 / 57,153120,000 / 54,431
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)104,000 / 47,174104,000 / 47,17485,000 / 385,55494,000 / 42,63885,000 / 38,555
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)210,000 / 95,255214,000 / 97,069205,000220,000 / 99,791205,000 / 92,986
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)4080 / 15.454800 / 18.183600 / 13.644800 / 18.183600 / 13.64
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)11 / 1011 / 1011 / 1011 / 1011 / 10
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)46 / 2350 / 2553 / 26.5057 / 28.5053 / 26.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)62 / 157562 / 157562 / 157558 / 147362 / 1575
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)180 / 12.40180 / 12.40180 / 12.40180 / 12.40180 / 12.40
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)18" x 24" / 457x61018" x 24" / 457x61019" x 24" / 483x610 (1)18" x 24" / 457x61020" x 24" / 508x610 (1)
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)29" x 24" / 737x610 (1)30" x 24" / 762x610 (1)
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)19,189 / 8703.9919,189 / 8703.9914,959 / 6785.3020,513 / 9304.5516,401 / 7439.38
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.27 4.69 6.33 4.97 5.85
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)121 / 11.24120 / 11.15125 / 11.61152 / 14.12125 / 11.61
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)28.60 / 2.6628.60 / 2.6623.40 / 2.1728.50 / 2.6523.40 / 2.17
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1586 / 147.341491 / 138.521291 / 119.94996 / 92.531291 / 119.94
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)229 / 21.27
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1586 / 147.341491 / 138.521291 / 119.941225 / 113.801291 / 119.94
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume224.37210.93327.84140.91295.88
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation51485148421251304212
Same as above plus superheater percentage51485148421261054212
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area21,78021,60022,50032,55822,500
Power L157655502388593963630
Power MT464.99404.33271.18609.25250.09

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassD3eD3h, D3kD4a, b, c, d, eD4fD4f
Locobase ID15,724 15,725 15,681 10,103 8057
RailroadCanadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)
CountryCanadaCanadaCanadaCanadaCanada
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class18301310
Road Numbers417/317631-638/433-440/333-340/7333-7340450-479480-492480-92 / 478-80 / 378-80
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built83013
BuilderCPRCPRCPRBurnham, Williams & CoCP
Year1910189418971905
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)11.83 / 3.6113.42 / 4.0913.42 / 4.0913.42 / 4.0913.42 / 4.09
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)21.48 / 6.5523.06 / 7.0323.94 / 7.3023.94 / 7.3023.94 / 7.30
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.55 0.58 0.56 0.56 0.56
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)48.37 / 14.7447.87 / 14.5948.75 / 14.8648.29 / 14.7248.29 / 14.72
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)35,000 / 15,87632,550 / 14,76434,000
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)100,000 / 45,35997,000 / 43,99998,000 / 44,45296,320 / 43,69097,000 / 43,999
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)130,000 / 58,967126,000 / 57,153129,000 / 58,513127,680 / 57,915132,000 / 59,874
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)85,000 / 38,55593,000 / 42,18497,000 / 43,99980,640 / 36,57888,000 / 39,916
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)215,000 / 97,522219,000 / 99,337226,000 / 102,512208,320 / 94,493220,000 / 99,790
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)3600 / 13.644200 / 15.913840 / 14.553840 / 14.554800 / 18.18
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)11 / 1011 / 1011 / 1011 / 10
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)56 / 2854 / 2754 / 2754 / 2754 / 27
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)62 / 157562 / 157562 / 157562 / 157562 / 1575
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)180 / 12.40200 / 13.80200 / 13.80200 / 13.80180 / 12.40
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)18" x 24" / 457x61018" x 24" / 457x61019" x 24" / 483x61013.5" x 24" / 343x61019" x 24" / 483x610
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)23" x 24" / 584x610
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)19,189 / 8703.9921,321 / 9671.0523,756 / 10775.5517,840 / 8092.1021,381 / 9698.27
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 5.21 4.55 4.13 5.40 4.54
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)152 / 14.12118 / 10.96118 / 11.15153 / 14.22120 / 11.15
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)28.50 / 2.6528.60 / 2.6628.60 / 2.6628.50 / 2.6529 / 2.70
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)996 / 92.531428 / 132.661428 / 132.661615 / 150.091594 / 148.14
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)229 / 21.27
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1225 / 113.801428 / 132.661428 / 132.661615 / 150.091594 / 148.14
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume140.91202.02181.31406.18202.39
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation51305720572057005220
Same as above plus superheater percentage61055720572057005220
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area32,55823,60023,60030,60021,600
Power L110,0445900529542625181
Power MT664.30402.29357.35292.65353.26

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassD4gD5aD6a - compoundD6a - superheatedD6b/D6d - later configuration
Locobase ID4491 15,727 9441 2658 9442
RailroadCanadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)
CountryCanadaCanadaCanadaCanadaCanada
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class763202039
Road Numbers417-492/2425-24362460-200-202/494-496926-945/500-519500-519521-538, 540-559
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built76320
BuilderseveralCPRAlco-SchenectadyseveralCPR
Year1912189719021912
Valve GearWalschaertStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)11.83 / 3.6113.42 / 4.0914.83 / 4.5214.83 / 4.5214.83 / 4.52
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)22.08 / 6.7323.35 / 7.1225.92 / 7.9022.67 / 6.9122.67 / 6.91
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.54 0.57 0.57 0.65 0.65
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)50.25 / 15.3249.10 / 14.9754.54 / 16.6254.54 / 16.6254.54 / 16.62
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)43,000
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)108,500 / 49,215110,000 / 49,895124,000 / 56,246128,000 / 58,060131,000 / 59,421
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)146,000 / 66,225137,000 / 62,142168,000 / 76,204172,000 / 78,018176,000 / 79,832
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)75,000 / 34,01990,000 / 40,823122,000 / 55,338122,000 / 55,338127,000 / 57,606
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)221,000 / 100,244227,000 / 102,965290,000 / 131,542294,000 / 133,356303,000 / 137,438
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)6000 / 22.733840 / 14.556000 / 22.736000 / 22.736000 / 22.73
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)12 / 10.9011 / 10 8.30 / 9.1010 / 9.1010 / 9.10
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)60 / 3061 / 30.5069 / 34.5071 / 35.5073 / 36.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)62 / 157562 / 157569 / 175363 / 160063 / 1600
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)180 / 12.40200 / 13.80210 / 14.50210 / 14.50210 / 14.50
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)19" x 24" / 483x61019" x 24" / 508x61022" x 26" / 559x660 (1)20" x 26" / 508x66020" x 26" / 508x660
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm) / 76235" x 26" / 889x660 (1)
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)21,381 / 9698.2723,756 / 10775.5523,335 / 10584.5929,467 / 13366.0229,467 / 13366.02
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 5.07 4.63 5.31 4.34 4.45
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)154 / 14.31143 / 13.29171.96 / 16.64193 / 17.94173 / 16.08
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)28 / 2.6031.80 / 2.9530.71 / 2.8530.80 / 2.8633 / 3.07
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1081 / 100.461593 / 147.992445 / 227.231798 / 167.101832 / 170.26
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)195 / 18.12328 / 30.48306 / 28.44
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1276 / 118.581593 / 147.992445 / 227.232126 / 197.582138 / 198.70
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume137.26202.27427.48190.19193.78
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation50406360644964686930
Same as above plus superheater percentage57966360644974387900
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area31,87828,60036,11246,61041,416
Power L185166056551313,33012,714
Power MT519.11364.12294.05688.77641.90

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassD6b/D6d - superheatedD6c - superheatedD8a/D12aD9bD9c
Locobase ID15,731 15,730 15,734 5352 15,679
RailroadCanadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)
CountryCanadaCanadaCanadaCanadaCanada
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class39120137
Road Numbers521-538, 540-5595391176-1179/796-799/1996-19991300/560566-597
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built201
BuilderCPRCPRCPRSchenectadySchenectady
Year190319031903
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonWalschaertWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)14.50 / 4.4214.50 / 4.4213.17 / 4.0114.83 / 4.5214.83 / 4.52
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)25.17 / 7.6725.17 / 7.6724.17 / 7.3726.08 / 7.9526.08 / 7.95
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.58 0.58 0.54 0.57 0.57
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)53 / 16.1553 / 16.1553.92 / 16.4354.50 / 16.6154.50 / 16.61
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)45,000 / 20,41249,660 / 22,525
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)128,000 / 58,060129,000 / 58,513144,000 / 65,317141,095 / 64,000142,000 / 64,410
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)168,000 / 76,204172,000 / 78,018178,000 / 80,740192,000 / 87,090190,000 / 86,183
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)126,600 / 57,425126,600 / 57,425122,000 / 55,338122,000 / 55,338122,000 / 55,338
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)294,600 / 133,629298,600 / 135,443300,000 / 136,078314,000 / 142,428312,000 / 141,521
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)6000 / 22.736000 / 22.736000 / 22.736000 / 22.73
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)11 / 1011 / 1013.20 / 1211 / 10
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)71 / 35.5072 / 3680 / 4078 / 3979 / 39.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)63 / 160063 / 160063 / 160062 / 157563 / 1600
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)200 / 13.80200 / 13.80200 / 13.80200 / 13.80190 / 13.10
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)20" x 26" / 508x66022" x 26" / 559x660 (1)21" x 28" / 533x71122" x 30" / 559x762 (1)21" x 30" / 533x762
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)33" x 26" / 838x660 (1)35" x 30" / 889x762 (1)
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)28,063 / 12729.1823,509 / 10663.5233,320 / 15113.7228,538 / 12944.6333,915 / 15383.60
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.56 5.49 4.32 4.94 4.19
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)160 / 14.86160 / 14.86203 / 18.86171.92 / 16.73180 / 16.72
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)33 / 3.0733 / 3.0735 / 3.2549.82 / 4.6349.60 / 4.61
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1819 / 168.992050 / 190.452580 / 239.692483 / 231.692442 / 226.87
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)366 / 34349 / 32.42290408 / 37.90
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)2185 / 202.992399 / 222.872580 / 239.692773 / 231.692850 / 264.77
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume192.41358.42229.85376.24203.05
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation66006600700099649424
Same as above plus superheater percentage77227590700010,96010,743
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area37,44036,80040,60037,82238,988
Power L113,13597766726736511,635
Power MT678.70501.22308.92345.24541.92

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassE2a/E2bE2cE2dE2e/E1eE2f/E1f
Locobase ID15,744 15,745 15,746 15,747 15,748
RailroadCanadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)
CountryCanadaCanadaCanadaCanadaCanada
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class42511
Road Numbers439-442/805-807/2000-2002808-809/2008-2009551-555/811-12, 815, 813-14/2003+812/2006815/2007
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built45
BuilderCPRCPRCPRCPRCPR
Year18891911189119101911
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)13.25 / 4.0413.25 / 4.0413.25 / 4.0413.25 / 4.0413.25 / 4.04
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)22.83 / 6.9622.83 / 6.9622.83 / 6.9622.83 / 6.9622.83 / 6.96
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.58 0.58 0.58 0.58 0.58
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)48.33 / 14.7348.33 / 14.7348.33 / 14.7349.12 / 14.9749.12 / 14.97
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)84,000 / 38,102115,000 / 52,163103,000 / 46,720108,000 / 48,988116,000 / 52,617
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)107,000 / 48,534145,000 / 65,771129,000 / 58,513135,000 / 61,235146,500 / 66,451
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)104,000 / 47,174104,000 / 47,174104,000 / 47,174110,000 / 49,895117,750 / 53,411
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)211,000 / 95,708249,000 / 112,945233,000 / 105,687245,000 / 111,130264,250 / 119,862
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)4080 / 15.454080 / 15.454080 / 15.454080 / 15.455610 / 21.25
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)11 / 1011 / 1011 / 1011 / 1011 / 10
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)47 / 23.5064 / 3257 / 28.5060 / 3064 / 32
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)70 / 177870 / 177870 / 177870 / 177870 / 1778
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)180 / 12.40180 / 12.40180 / 12.40180 / 12.40180 / 12.40
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)19" x 24" / 483x61018" x 24" / 457x61018" x 24" / 457x61018" x 24" / 457x61018" x 24" / 457x610
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)18,937 / 8589.6916,996 / 7709.2716,996 / 7709.2716,996 / 7709.2716,996 / 7709.27
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.44 6.77 6.06 6.35 6.83
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)111 / 10.31152 / 14.12118 / 10.96118 / 10.96152 / 14.12
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)28.50 / 2.6528 / 2.6028.50 / 2.6528.50 / 2.6528.60 / 2.66
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1506 / 139.911157 / 107.491408 / 130.811169 / 108.601170 / 108.70
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)253 / 23.50255 / 23.69257 / 23.88
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1506 / 139.911410 / 130.991408 / 130.811424 / 132.291427 / 132.58
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume191.22163.68199.19165.38165.52
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation51305040513051305148
Same as above plus superheater percentage51305947513060536075
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area19,98032,28521,24025,06332,285
Power L1549512,460593612,04412,605
Power MT432.66716.60381.16737.57718.69

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassE3a - smooth tubesE4dE5d, e, h - superheatedE5f/gSM
Locobase ID15,749 15,753 4507 6554 11,253
RailroadCanadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)
CountryCanadaCanadaCanadaCanadaCanada
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class1014515
Road Numbers820-822/2020-2021/2013-2022825-846/2025-20462062-2099906-920/2106-2120456, 459
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built75
BuilderCPRCPRCPRCPRCPR
Year191319111889
Valve GearWalschaertWalschaertStephensonWalschaertStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)13.25 / 4.0414.50 / 4.4214.50 / 4.4214.83 / 4.5213.25 / 4.04
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)22.83 / 6.9624.50 / 7.4724.92 / 7.6025.92 / 7.9022.92 / 6.99
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.58 0.59 0.58 0.57 0.58
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)48.37 / 14.7450.86 / 15.5052.46 / 15.9954.50 / 16.61
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)36,425 / 16,52240,000 / 18,14446,000 / 20,865
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)103,500 / 46,947116,000 / 52,617129,000 / 58,513136,000 / 61,68984,000 / 38,102
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)130,000 / 58,967152,000 / 68,946166,000 / 75,296180,000 / 81,647107,000 / 48,534
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)100,000 / 45,359112,600 / 51,075126,600 / 57,425127,000 / 57,606
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)230,000 / 104,326264,600 / 120,021292,600 / 132,721307,000 / 139,253
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)3600 / 13.645400 / 20.456000 / 22.736000 / 22.73
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)11 / 10 8.80 / 811 / 1010 / 9.10
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)58 / 2964 / 3272 / 3676 / 3847 / 23.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)70 / 177870 / 177870 / 177870 / 177875 / 1905
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)180 / 12.40200 / 13.80200 / 13.80200 / 13.80180 / 12.40
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)19" x 24" / 483x61020" x 24" / 508x61020" x 26" / 508x66020" x 26" / 508x66020" x 22" / 508x559
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)18,937 / 8589.6923,314 / 10575.0725,257 / 11456.4025,257 / 11456.4017,952 / 8142.90
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 5.47 4.98 5.11 5.38 4.68
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)144 / 13.38155 / 14.40160 / 14.86190 / 17.66120.40 / 11.19
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)25 / 2.3232.50 / 3.0233 / 3.0730.80 / 2.8625.30 / 2.35
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1736 / 161.281378 / 128.021833 / 170.291795 / 166.821491 / 138.52
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)362 / 33.63368 / 34.19389 / 36.15
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1736 / 161.281740 / 161.652201 / 204.482184 / 202.971491 / 138.52
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume220.42157.91193.89189.87186.39
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation45006500660061604554
Same as above plus superheater percentage45007865772272694554
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area25,92037,51037,44044,84021,672
Power L1654914,46814,67315,4165887
Power MT418.49824.91752.29749.70463.52

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassSO/C1bSR/D3bSR2/D3jSR2/D4a, D4b, D4c, D4dST 12 / D6b
Locobase ID15,708 3750 9939 9935 15,729
RailroadCanadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)
CountryCanadaCanadaCanadaCanadaCanada
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class137322820
Road Numbers477-479534-550, 556-575, 585-602, 608-617639-640/441-442/7341-7342641-668981-1000/520-539
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built137322820
BuilderCanadian Locomotive CoCPRCPRCPRNorth British
Year18901890189718971903
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)11.83 / 3.6111.8313.42 / 4.0914.50 / 4.42
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)21.29 / 6.4921.4823.06 / 7.0325.17 / 7.67
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.56 0.55 0.58 0.58
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)47.81 / 14.5748.0647.83 / 14.5853 / 16.15
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)36,000 / 16,32933,50032,550 / 14,76433,500 / 15,19545,000
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)81,000 / 36,74194,752 / 42,97997,000 / 43,99996,000 / 43,545128,000 / 58,060
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)105,000 / 47,627120,000126,000 / 57,153126,000 / 57,153169,000 / 76,657
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)94,000 / 42,63885,00092,050 / 41,753126,600 / 57,425
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)199,000 / 90,265205,000218,050 / 98,906295,600 / 134,082
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)4800 / 18.183600 / 11.364350 / 16.486000 / 22.73
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)11 / 1011 / 9.109 / 8.2011 / 10
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)45 / 22.5053 / 26.5054 / 2753 / 26.5071 / 35.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)58 / 147362 / 157562 / 157562 / 157563 / 1600
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)180 / 12.40180 / 12.40200 / 13.80200 / 13.80200 / 13.80
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)18" x 24" / 457x61018" x 24" / 457x61019" x 24" / 483x610 (1)19" x 24" / 483x610 (1)22" x 26" / 559x660 (1)
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)29" x 24" / 737x610 (1)29" x 24" / 737x610 (1)33" x 26" / 838x660 (1)
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)20,513 / 9304.5519,189 / 8703.9916,621 / 7539.1716,621 / 7539.1723,509 / 10663.52
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.95 4.94 5.84 5.78 5.44
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)120 / 11.15125118 / 10.96118 / 10.96160 / 14.86
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)23.40 / 2.1723.40 / 2.1728.54 / 2.6528.60 / 2.6633 / 3.07
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1282 / 119.101291 / 119.981428 / 132.661440 / 133.782423 / 225.10
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1282 / 119.101291 / 119.981428 / 132.661440 / 133.782423 / 225.10
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume181.37182.64362.63365.68423.63
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation42124212570857206600
Same as above plus superheater percentage42124212570857206600
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area21,60022,50023,60023,60032,000
Power L146335042454645735259
Power MT378.30351.94309.97315.05271.74

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassST 12 / D6dST11/D9aST12 // D6aST13/E5fST2/E3a
Locobase ID10,373 13,511 9765 15,759 3749
RailroadCanadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)
CountryCanadaCanadaCanadaCanadaCanada
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class203638123
Road Numbers961-980/540-5591301-1337/566-597825-849867-870, 874-881/906-917625-627/820-822
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built203638123
BuilderSachsische MaschinenfabrikAlco-SchenectadyseveralSchenectadyCP
Year19031903190219031893
Valve GearStephensonWalschaertStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)14.50 / 4.4214.83 / 4.5214.50 / 4.4214.83 / 4.5213.25 / 4.04
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)25.17 / 7.6726.08 / 7.9524.92 / 7.6025.92 / 7.9022.83 / 6.96
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.58 0.57 0.58 0.57 0.58
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)53 / 16.1554.50 / 16.6152.45 / 15.9954.08 / 16.4852.49 / 16
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)43,000 / 19,504
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)128,000 / 58,060142,000 / 64,410136,700 / 62,006125,000 / 56,69998,000 / 44,200
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)164,500 / 74,616190,000 / 86,183173,830 / 78,848166,000 / 75,296125,000 / 55,500
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)127,000 / 57,606122,000 / 55,338126,600 / 57,425116,000 / 52,617
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)291,500 / 132,222312,000 / 141,521300,430 / 136,273282,000 / 127,913
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)6000 / 22.736000 / 22.736000 / 22.736000 / 22.733600 / 12
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)11 / 1011 / 1011 / 1011 / 1010 / 10
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)71 / 35.5079 / 39.5076 / 3869 / 34.5054 / 27
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)63 / 160063 / 160069 / 175370 / 177870 / 1778
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)210 / 14.50200 / 13.80210 / 14.50200 / 13.80180 / 12.40
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)22" x 26" / 559x660 (1)22" x 30" / 559x762 (1)20" x 26" / 508x66020" x 26" / 508x66019" x 24" / 483x610
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)33" x 26" / 838x660 (1)35" x 30" / 889x762 (1)
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)24,684 / 11196.4928,085 / 12739.1626,904 / 12203.4625,257 / 11456.4018,937 / 8589.69
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 5.19 5.06 5.08 4.95 5.18
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)152.60 / 14.18180 / 16.72165 / 15.33179 / 16.63144.40 / 13.37
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)33.10 / 3.0849.82 / 4.6334.90 / 3.2430.80 / 2.8625.40 / 2.36
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)2415 / 224.443065 / 284.752429 / 225.662452 / 227.801453 / 135.04
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)2415 / 224.443065 / 284.752429 / 225.662452 / 227.801453 / 135.04
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume422.23464.43256.93259.36184.49
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation69519964732961604572
Same as above plus superheater percentage69519964732961604572
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area32,04636,00034,65035,80025,992
Power L154454985831282615799
Power MT281.35232.18402.15437.10391.37

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassST3/E4aST3/E4bST3/E4cST5 - compoundST5/E5a
Locobase ID15,750 15,751 15,752 15,755 15,754
RailroadCanadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)
CountryCanadaCanadaCanadaCanadaCanada
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class66436
Road Numbers203-208/825-830/2027212-223/831-843/2031, 2037, 2039, 2043224-227/843-846810-812/856-858801-806
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built66436
BuilderCPRCPRCPRCPRCPR
Year18991899190019021902
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)14.50 / 4.4214.50 / 4.4214.50 / 4.4214.50 / 4.4214.50 / 4.42
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)24.50 / 7.4724.50 / 7.4724.50 / 7.4724.83 / 7.5724.83 / 7.57
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.59 0.59 0.59 0.58 0.58
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)50.86 / 15.5050.86 / 15.5050.86 / 15.5052.46 / 15.9952.46 / 15.99
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)46,800 / 21,22846,800 / 21,22846,800 / 21,22845,000 / 20,41248,000 / 21,772
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)116,000 / 52,617116,000 / 52,617115,000 / 52,163127,000 / 57,606137,000 / 62,142
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)151,000 / 68,493151,500 / 68,719152,000 / 68,946166,000 / 75,296174,000 / 78,925
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)112,600 / 51,075112,600 / 51,075112,600 / 51,075126,600 / 57,425126,600 / 57,425
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)263,600 / 119,568264,100 / 119,794264,600 / 120,021292,600 / 132,721300,600 / 136,350
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)5400 / 20.455400 / 20.455400 / 20.456000 / 22.736000 / 22.73
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT) 8.80 / 8 8.80 / 8 8.80 / 811 / 1011 / 10
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)64 / 3264 / 3264 / 3271 / 35.5076 / 38
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)70 / 177870 / 177870 / 177870 / 177870 / 1778
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)200 / 13.80200 / 13.80200 / 13.80200 / 13.80200 / 13.80
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)19" x 24" / 483x61020" x 24" / 508x61021.5" x 24" / 546x610 (1)22" x 26" / 559x660 (1)20" x 26" / 508x660
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)32" x 24" / 813x610 (1)33" x 26" / 838x660 (1)
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)21,041 / 9544.0523,314 / 10575.0718,563 / 8420.0521,158 / 9597.1225,257 / 11456.40
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 5.51 4.98 6.20 6.00 5.42
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)155 / 14.40155 / 14.40155 / 14.40153 / 14.21166 / 15.42
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)32.50 / 3.0232.50 / 3.0232.50 / 3.0231 / 2.8834.90 / 3.24
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1872 / 173.911872 / 173.911872 / 173.912385 / 221.572398 / 222.78
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1872 / 173.911872 / 173.911872 / 173.912385 / 221.572398 / 222.78
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume237.69214.52371.25416.99253.65
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation65006500650062006980
Same as above plus superheater percentage65006500650062006980
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area31,00031,00031,00030,60033,200
Power L178427078552957117967
Power MT447.12403.56317.98297.42384.62

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassST6/E5cST7/E5dST7/E5eSV2/D5b
Locobase ID15,756 15,757 15,758 15,726
RailroadCanadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)Canadian Pacific (CPR)
CountryCanadaCanadaCanadaCanada
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class612323
Road Numbers807-812/856-861/2056-2061812-824825-856197-199/491-493
GaugeStdStdStdStd
Number Built312323
BuilderCPRCPRNeilson/NBLCPR
Year1902190219031897
Valve GearStephensonWalschaertWalschaertStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)14.50 / 4.4214.50 / 4.4214.50 / 4.4213.42 / 4.09
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)24.83 / 7.5724.83 / 7.5724.83 / 7.5723.35 / 7.12
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.58 0.58 0.58 0.57
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)52.46 / 15.9952.46 / 15.9952.46 / 15.9949.10 / 14.97
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)45,000 / 20,41246,000 / 20,86546,000 / 20,865
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)127,000 / 57,606129,000 / 58,513129,000 / 58,513110,000 / 49,895
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)165,000 / 74,843166,000 / 75,296166,000 / 75,296137,000 / 62,142
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)126,600 / 57,425126,600 / 57,425126,600 / 57,42590,000 / 40,823
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)291,600 / 132,268292,600 / 132,721292,600 / 132,721227,000 / 102,965
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)6000 / 22.736000 / 22.736000 / 22.733840 / 14.55
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)11 / 1011 / 1011 / 1011 / 10
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)71 / 35.5072 / 3672 / 3661 / 30.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)70 / 177870 / 177870 / 177862 / 1575
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)200 / 13.80200 / 13.80200 / 13.80200 / 13.80
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)20" x 26" / 508x66020" x 26" / 508x66020" x 26" / 508x66020" x 24" / 508x610 (1)
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)30" x 24" / 762x610 (1)
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)25,257 / 11456.4025,257 / 11456.4025,257 / 11456.4018,223 / 8265.82
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 5.03 5.11 5.11 6.04
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)153 / 14.21160 / 14.86160 / 14.86143 / 13.29
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)31 / 2.8833 / 3.0733 / 3.0731.80 / 2.95
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1812 / 168.342392 / 222.222392 / 222.221593 / 147.99
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)366 / 34
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)2178 / 202.342392 / 222.222392 / 222.221593 / 147.99
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume191.67253.02253.02365.09
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation6200660066006360
Same as above plus superheater percentage7254660066006360
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area35,80232,00032,00028,600
Power L114,490787878784859
Power MT754.60403.91403.91292.15

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