South African Railways Beyer-Garratt Locomotives in South_Africa


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class FC (Locobase 13096)

Designed as a "modified Fairlie", this engine has a double firebox and two boilers on a single rigid frame. The two sets of engine bogies pivot underneath, showing that this actually was a Kitson-Meyer type.

Reder (1974) explains that SAR's Colonel Collins obtained this batch of engines to see if they could offer competition to the Beyer-Garratts, then monopolizing the articulated stud. Alas, reports Reder, "In negotiating curves, the pivot pins came under too much stress due to the pronounced lateral sway of the long overhangs. These engines thus proved more expensive to maintain than the Garratt locomotives, and as a result were soon scrapped."


Class FD (Locobase 2484)

Data from Holland, Volume II (1972), pp. 50-51. Works numbers were 23294-23297 in 1926.

As explained in Locobase 13096, the "Modified Fairlies" that Colonel FR Collins ordered were actually very similar to Kitson-Meyers, although the firebox layout was different. In any case, they were "...not very satisfactory" says Holland. "[T]he long overhang at front and back tended to vibrate in an up-and-down directions when the engine was in motion with a consequent setting up of metal fatigue and cracking of the frames."

Otherwise, Holland concedes, they were "powerful and good steamers", but did not last long in service.


Class GA (Locobase 745)

Data from Holland (1972,II), pp. 41 and "Recent 'Garratt' Patent Locomotives", Railway Engineer, Volume 43, No. 5 (May 1922), pp. 184-186. See also Peter Ball, "The Big Fiery Giant - The Story of the Beyer-Garratt Locomotive", The Heritage Portal (South Africa), dated Tuesday, November 17, 2015 - 15:43, at [external link], Works number was 5941 in 1918.

Trialled by the SAR for main-line service, this engine effectively ended Mallet articulated locomotive procurement in the South Africa. According to Holland (1972, II), the GA Mogul Garratt "...took greater loads ...running times were better, also coal and water consumption were lower." Average advantages included about 10% greater load running over the road in less time consuming 11% less fuel and weighing almost 40 tons (89,600 lb or 40,642 kg) less.

Peter Ball added some detail to Durrant's summary, beginning with the nicely tongue-in-cheek characterization of a competition that had "come down to just a two (iron) horse race ...between the Mallet and the Beyer-Garratt." The Garratt was the GA shown here and the North British Locomotive Company MH class 2-6-6-2 Mallet found in Locobase 2866. The "race course" would be the former Natal main line between Durban on the coast and Ladysmith up on the Highveld plateau. "[G]radients were as steep as 1 in 30 [3.33%] and curves as tight as 4 1/2 chains radius (just under 300 feet [91.4 m]."

While the tests showed the basic concept's superiority to the basic Mallet (which was by no means a bad design), the GA's lack of a trailing truck on the lead engine unit and a leading truck on the trailing engine unit inflicted flange wear on the drivers. All succeeding SAR Garratts, of which there were many, used a balanced-truck layout on each of the two engine units.

Problems with frame cracking led to an early retirement in 1938.


Class GB (Locobase 748)

Data from Holland (1972,II), pp. 41-42. See also "Recent 'Garratt' Patent Locomotives", Railway Engineer, Volume 43, No. 5 (May 1922), pp. 184-186. Works numbers were 5942 in 1921, 6181-6186 in 1924.

Branch-line Prairie Garratts, the first series production of the type in South Africa. The prototype, delivered in 1921, weighed 160,496 lb each and had 1,049 sq ft of heating surface in 128 tubes and 105 sq ft of firebox and 174 sq ft of superheat surface.

When BP produced the series shown in the specs, says Holland, they supplied a cab design with a more complete enclosure and cab windows.


Class GC (Locobase 749)

Data from Weiner (1930). See also Data from Holland (1972,II), pp. 43. Works numbers 6187-6192.

Prairie Garratts that were heavier than the GBs, but also used in branch-line operations as the axle load suggests.


Class GCA (Locobase 755)

Data from DF Holland, Volume II (1972), pp. 52-53. Works numbers were 970-982 in 1927, 1043-1068 in 1928.

Branch-line versions of the GC Prairie Garratt class with bar frames, round-topped fireboxes, and a lighter axle load. The second batch, delivered in 1928, weighed more in aggregate, but had a lower maximum axle load. A tendency to break side rods was the design's only failing, says Holland, who attributes the problem to small drivers turned at excessive speeds.

Data from Gavin Hamilton's excellent compilation of Garratt data posted at [external link]

(6 September 2005) shows different values for the EHS -- 1,366 sq ft -- and the superheater -- 226 sq ft -- for a total CHS as 1,592 sq ft. Locobase supposes that Hamilton's numbers were as delivered, while Holland's (taken from a locomotive diagram published in Holland's book) represent a later rebuild.


Class GD (Locobase 751)

Data from Wiener (1930). See also [external link]

(6 September 2005) and Holland, Volume II (1972), p.p. 47-48.

First batch's works numbers were 6263-6266. Beyer also delivered 2228-2234 (BP 6281-6287) in 1925 and 2235-2237 (BP 6288-6290) in 1926.

Data from Gavin Hamilton's excellent compilation of Garratt data posted at shows 260 sq ft for the superheater for a total of 1,937 sq ft of CHS. Locobase wonders if Wiener described one batch and Hamilton another.

Fourteen of this Double Prairie Garratt class entered service, working Capetown-Caledon (380 short tons on line that included 10 miles of continuous 2 1/2% grade), Durban-north coast (3.33% ruling grade over 124 miles), and Piertermaritzburg-Franklin (2 1/2% continuous grade over 37 miles to a summit of 2,944 ft).

In 1972, Holland's verdict on their utility was quite positive: "They were handy locomotives, trouble-free, and have given good service."

The class was scrapped in 1967.


Class GDA (Locobase 756)

Data from locomotive diagrams published on [external link] . See also Holland, Volume II (1972), pp. 61-62. Works numbers were 3115-3119 in 1929.

Branch line Double Prairie Garratts that repeated the GD design (Locobase 750) with a round-topped firebox and bar frame. They entered service only for a short time out of Cape Town and then lay idle for several years. Although they were eventually made to work satisfactorily, says Holland, "it has never been explained why it was found necessary to introduce a new class of locomotive of this type when the class GD had been found to be reliable and good locomotives."


Class GE - 1st order (Locobase 4382)

Data from Holland, Volume II (1972), pp. 31-32. Works numbers were 6193-6198 in 1925.

This was the first of 3 batches of powerful Double Mikado Garratts for use on the Zeerust-Mafeking and Pretoria-Pietersburg heavy freight service. All had the same boiler, but these first 6 had slightly more firebox area.


Class GE - 2nd order (Locobase 761)

Data from Holland, Volume II (1972), pp.45. Works numbers were 6339-6348.

Two years after the first batch of GE Double Mikados (Locobase 4382), Beyer Peacock delivered this second batch of Double Mikado Garratts in 1927. These had the same boilers, but slightly less superheat and smaller fireboxes.


Class GE - 3rd order (Locobase 2907)

Data from Holland, Volume II (1972), pp. 45. Works numbers were 6716-6717 in 1931.

This was the third batch of Class GE Double Mikado Garratts first put into service in 1924 (Locobase 4382), but with cylinders 1" larger in diameter and small increases in heating surface including 27 sq ft of arch tubes. At the time of their introduction, they probably were the most powerful narrow-gauge locomotives in service.


Class GEA (Locobase 768)

Firebox heating surface included 27 sq ft of arch tubes.

One of the biggest single batches of Garratt locomotives under a single order (BP#s 7168-7127). Holland (1972, II) notes that although based on the older GEs, these Mountain Garratt engines bore little resemblance to them. Their ambit was the Johannesburg-Zeerust line and the Mossel Bay-Oudtshoorn region.


Class GF (Locobase 765)

Data from diagrams published on the web at [external link] (visited 5 Jan 2001).

Hanomag built the first batch of 37 Pacific Garratt engines (works #s 10512-10548) in 1927 to the design of SAR's Col. FR Collins. He was seeking a mixed-traffic, branch-line engine. With the GF's, he achieved that goal once inside-bearing trucks were replaced by outside-bearing ones. That kink worked out, these engines were very successful, which led to another order to Henschel (18 -- works # 21053-21070 in 1928) and to JA Maffei (10 -- works # 5748-5757 -- also in 1928).

Four were later sold to the Mozambique Railways as series 911.


Class GG (Locobase 750)

Data from Holland, Volume II (1972), p. 47-49.

This was basically a one-off attempt at a Double Prairie Garratt express locomotive. She proved herself capable of 57 mph with a load and she could work up to 1,245 tons up a 1 1/4% grade -- no small accomplishment. Another run took 340 tons up a 2 1/2% grade 15 miles long in 62 minutes.

She proved unsteady at high speeds, however, and was relegated to secondary passenger and freight duties.


Class GH (Locobase 13099)

Data from DF Holland, Volume II (1972), p. 57. Works numbers were 5687-5688 in 1928.

Not satisfied with the Union Garratts U-boats already supplied to him by Maffei, Colonel Collins returned to the German builder for two more still bigger engines. Unlike the U-boats, this pair had the short boiler of the pure Garratt. They also had relatively high drivers for use on several expresses.

A significant oversight became apparent on the first trial runs according to Holland when it was found "...that they exceeded the moving structure gauge and scraped the platforms of every station through which they passed." Embarrassing as it must have been in 1928, the latter-day reader can't help but smile at Holland's report of the result: "They returned to Salt River works minus their steps and sundry fittings, and pungent letters were written by various irate stationmasters about the damage done to their platforms! [exclamation point in the original]."

The two engines never proved very successful. The modified Fairlie with its engine units pivoting around a central pivot "...gave trouble by causing broken frames and undue wear, " says Holland. "Further, the long overhange of the cradle frame from the pivot centers caused considerable vertical vibration when running, thus setting up structural weaknesses."


Class GL (Locobase 766)

Data from Holland, Volume II (1972), p. 61. Works numbers were 6520-6531 in 1929, 6639-6644.

Two arch tubes and two Nicholson syphons contributed to the generous direct heating surface area.

OS Nock (RWC V, pl 66) says these engines scaled the Durban bank to Cato Ridge, which included 38 miles of 1.5% grade, pulling 1,205 tons. The 4-8-2s these Mountain Garratts replaced could pull 500 tons and took 21 minutes longer. At the time of their introduction, says Holland (1972, II), this class comprised "the most powerful steam locomotives to be placed in service anywhere in the southern hemisphere."

[external link], put up by David Guelpa of Bloemfontein, has some personal comments about the GLs. From the driver's point of view, it was "a magnificent machine to work. One point was very clear. A driver had to be well acquainted with the GL and to many whom was not (sic) it was a battle to keep the loads moving. Many of them stalled on the upgrades and had to split the load in two in order to clear the section."

Firing the GL: "You either enjoyed the challenge or despised it." Limitations in the automatic stoker's distribution pattern meant that the fireman had to fill in down the middle and at the back. Adding to the backache was the small-diameter coal (1" or so). So fine was this coal that when the engine was being worked hard, it never even reached the grate before igniting.

"It was hard work," concedes Guelpa," but the best days of my life were woring on those mighty GLs."


Class GM (Locobase 767)

These Double Mountain Garratts (BP #s 6883-6898) were designed to a requirement to handle larger trains on the 60-lb rail of the Johannesburg-Mafeking line, whose profile had a sawtooth quality of up and down grades. These engines trailed a 6,750 gallon auxiliary water tank to supplement the meager tender capacity. That small capacity resulted from the SAR's chief civil enginer's demand for a reduction in axle loadings.

Holland (1972, II)


Class GMA/GMAM (Locobase 769)

Firebox heating surface included 25.2 sq ft of arch tubes. Superheat surface was later reduced to 636 sq ft.

Developments of Beyer, Peacock's pre-war GMs, these two classes of Double Mountain Garratts had cast-steel engine beds, roller bearings, a U-shaped welded foundation ring, mechanical stokers and rocking grates. GMAs had a tender water capacity of 1,650 gallons and coal capacity of 11 tons. Water capacity was augmented by a permanently coupled trailing tank car holding 6,750 gallons.

Henschel built the first 20 (works # 28680-28704) and the last 30 (works # 29600-29629). Beyer, Peacock and North British split the remainder, Beyer's building 4079-4098 and 4121-4130 and NBLC supplying 4099-4140 (works # 27691-27702 in 1956, 27769-27778 and 27783-27792 in 1958)..

They were very successful and well-balanced engines. Holland (1972, II) reports that hammer blow from their drivers didn't exceed 1 ton for any wheel at 45 mph.


Class GO (Locobase 771)

Firebox heating surface included 26 sq ft of arch tubes.

Powerful Mountain Garratts (Henschel work #s 28705-28729) for the light 45-lb rail of two SAR branches, Natal's Greytown-Pietermartizburg and Transkei's Amabele-Umtata line. These were among the last steam engines to be ordered for South Africa's principal gauge. Attached to 6810 gallon auxiliary water tank.

Holland, II

Ziel and Eagleson (1973) note that this class was "Renowned as heavy haulers that are flogged to the limits of their mechanical endurance."


Class HF (Locobase 13097)

Data from Holland, Volume II (1972), p. 52. Works numbers were 20698-20707 in 1927 and 21052 in 1928.

A "modified Fairlie" designed by the SAR's Colonel Collins arrived on the Natal North Coast and disappointed at first. According to Holland, G Ramsay, mechanical engineer in the SAR's Durban shops, came up with modifications to the blast pipe arrangement. Then its power could be put to good use.


Class NG.G 16 (Locobase 703)

Data from South African Railways & Harbors 8 - 1941 Locomotive Diagram supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. See also [external link], last accessed 12 June 2016.

Prairie Garratt originally ordered by Tsumeb Corporation in what was then South West Africa (later Namibia). But the SWA converted all of its rail lines to the Cape Gauge (1,067 mm) and these seven were sold to the SAR before delivery.

Years after they left SAR service, three of the class served the Ffestiniog & West Highland Railway in North Wales. As of 2016, 137 and 143 operated during the season, the former in Crimson Lake livery, the latter in Brunswick Green. 143's 2014 overhaul stretched over a year and a half, constituting what Festpedia declared was "the most comprehensive overhaul that a Ngg16 has had at the WHR".

Its comprehensive quality illustrates the relatively robust support network for steam locomotive operation available in the 2016 British Isles. Festpedia listed all of the new components installed: "suspension links, springs, horn cheeks, horn keeps, rod end bushes, all of the bushes in the valvegear and pony trucks." Much work on worn components was required, Festpedia, including an"issue that we did not anticipate": fixing the rear frame stretcher.

143 returned to service in May 2016.


Class NG.G 16 (Locobase 759)

Data from locomotive diagrams published on [external link] . See also Eryl Crump, "Welsh Highland Railway to restore a 'New' Garratt loco", North Wales Daily Post (29 June 2015) at http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/welsh-highland-railway-restore-new-9545164, last accessed 12 June 2016; and https://www.festipedia.org.uk/wiki/Locomotives_used_on_the_WHR, last accessed 12 June 2016.

It's not clear why these Prairie Garratts had a different class number from the NGG 13s. The data show them to have been identical except for slightly reduced weights. [external link] (July 2002) says the larger cabs were one useful alteration.

Unusual in the Garratt world for having round boilers (vs the square-shouldered Belpaire fireboxes), the first four came from Cockerill led the class with delivery of NG85- NG88 (works 3265-3268) in 1937. Beyer, Peacock soon followed with 109-116 in 1939 (works numbers 6919-6926). After World War II, Beyer's also delivered NG125 - NG 131 (7426-7432) of this class in 1951.

Most withdrawn from service in the 1980s. Three of the class eventually found their ways to the Ffestiniog &West Highlands Railway. Cockerill-built 87 was sold first to North Yorkshire's Robin Hood's Bay project, but was resold to the F&WHR in 2007. Restored between 2006 and 2009, entering service in March 2009. In 2012, the 87's wheels and tires were replaced and the locomotive restored to service in a Colonial Blue livery.

109's F&WHR story is quite different. After its purchase from the Exmoor Steam Railway in 2009, its "fast-track" restoration by apprentices at the London & North Western Railway Company at Crewe was funded by the Peter Waterman Trust. Unfortunately for their plans, funding for the apprenticeship program was canceled and all work stopped. In 2014, "most of the loco" was delivered to F&WHR's Dinas shed for long-term storage.

The 130 was later bought by Gloucestershire's Steam Power Services, which sold the locomotive to Exmoor Steam Railway in late 2014. The Ffestiniog & Welsh Highland Railway ( F&WHR) obtained the engine in mid-2015 when it received the two power units, the boiler cradle, bunker and water tank and sent the boiler off to the boiler works at South Devon Railway and stated that it would build the other bunker and water tank as well as a new cab. At the time of the article, the target date for returning the 130 to service was Spring 2018.


Class NG.G 16 (Locobase 760)

Prairie Garratt based on the Cockerill-Beyer Peacock design of 1936-1938.

Data from Gavin Hamilton's excellent compilation of Garratt data posted at [external link] (6 September 2005). See also Phil Girdlestone & Shaun McMahon, "2ft gauge Little Titans for the Welsh Highland - The 'NGG16s'" published in 1994 and archived at http://www.martynbane.co.uk/modernsteam/pg/ngg16a/ngg16s.htm, last accessed 17 February 2014. Martyn Bane wrote an equally good and comprehensive article on these two Garratts' restoration titled "Alfred County Railway - Garratt 2-6-2+2-6-2 NGG16A Nos. 141 & 155", archived at http://www.martynbane.co.uk/modernsteam/pg/ngg16a/ngg16a.htm . 1967-68, the very last steam engines built for South African Railways in South Africa, the last Garratts built anywhere, and probably the last (3894-3901) built by Hunslet. Withdrawn from service in 1985.

Taken in hand by the Sandstone Heritage Trust, the 155 and the earlier 141 were moved to the Alfred County Railway and made over into NGG16As. Adopting many of the innovations pioneered by Livio da Porta, the project involved the following modifications:

Gas Producer Combustion System (Porta's significant redesign of the firebox)

Lempor exhaust with a De Laval blower;

Kordina BETWEEN engine units, not between individual cylinders (the Kordina, named after the Russian engineer who designed it, reduced exhaust back pressure by dividing the exhaust from the cylinders into two);

Master Mechanics self cleaning type spark arrestor specially smoothed for low draught loss. Rounded char breakers were fitted;

Lightweight, mutli-ringed, articulated piston valves;

Valvegear alterations;

Proportional feed mechanical lubrication;

Extended mechanical lubrication, going from a 17 point feed to a 21 point feed;

Roller bearings fitted to the eccentric cranks;

Larger water tank opening to avoid precise "spotting" of the locomotive at water columns.

141 was begun first in February 1988 and rolled out in August 1989. 155 began in March 1990.


Class NG.G11 (Locobase 744)

Data from Holland II (1972) as amended by an NG 11 diagram hosted on [external link], accessed 21 May 2006. See also "Recent 'Garratt' Patent Locomotives", Railway Engineer, Volume 43, No. 5 (May 1922), pp. 184-186. Works number was 5941 in 1918.

These Garratts had been ordered in 1914, but World War I delayed their delivery until 1919. They were pretty fundamental engines, unsuperheated and using slide valves to supply the cylinders. A Belpaire boiler sat between the engine units.

They traversed the ruling 3% grade on the 98-mile Stuartstown section in Natal (later known as the Ixopo branch).

Two of the three were withdrawn from service in 1962.


Class NG.G11 (Locobase 746)

Data from Holland II (1972) as amended by an NG 11 diagram hosted on [external link], accessed 21 May 2006.

Essentially repeats of the Mogul Garratt 2-footers from 1920, but with superheaters and piston valves. They began on the Ixopo branch. When supplanted by larger NGG 16s, the pair migrated to the Estcourt û Weenen branch. NGG 13 2-6-2+2-6-2 engines replaced them in that service and they ended their days on the Avontuur line.

Both withdrawn from service in October 1974; 6200 has been preserved.


Class NG.G12 (Locobase 754)

FB works numbers 2506-2507. These Prairie Garratts were sub contracted from Beyer Peacock (BP works #s 6365-6366). It's interesting to see the miniature ratios of superheat to combined heating surface, percentage of weight on drivers in these tiny, light-rail locomotives. Water capacity was divided between front (800 Imp gallons) and rear (200 Imp gall) tanks.

Data from Gavin Hamilton's excellent compilation of Garratt data posted at [external link]

(6 September 2005).


Class NG.G13 (Locobase 753)

Data from locomotive diagrams published on [external link]

NG49-NG50, and NG77-NG83 were delivered in 1928. Works numbers for these Prairie Garratts were 10549-10551, 10598-10599, and 10629-10635, respectively.

Some of these operated until 1974

[external link] (a German steam locomotive parts supplier) gives the normal steaming capacity as 5,000 kg/hr. The same site says these were rated as capable of hauling a 165-short ton train up a 2% grade at 25 kph.

[external link] (accessed 18 May 2006) featured an article on the NGGs by Phil Girdleston & Shaun McMahon published in the November 1994 Railway World. In that account they said that this series set SAR narrow-gauge Garratt design for the next 40 years. The 10 axles spread the weight out along 45 lb/yard (18.75 kg/m) rail. The closest two axles to the center used the Golsdorf system of lateral centering while the pony trucks at the extremes were more converntional.

www.epweb.co.za/dave/appleexpress/Theengines.htm (July 2002) comments that "[t]he cabs were much more cramped than those of the orginal Garratts, and the firemen and their clothes in particular suffered. They took to wearing a shield of leather." The engineer, on the other hand, could escape the heat by "swinging outside the cab." Although no heavier on the axles than the earlier Garratts, these engines pulled a satisfactory load.


Class NG.G14 (Locobase 757)

Data from Gavin Hamilton's excellent compilation of Garratt data posted at [external link]

(6 September 2005).

Uprated NG.G12s with the same boiler and grate, but slightly larger pistons. Hanomag's works number for this Prairie Garratt was 10747.


Class U (Locobase 13098)

Data from DF Holland, Volume II (1972), p. 56.

Nicknamed "U-boats" to reflect both the class ID and their German origin, these "Union Garratts" were a hybrid articulated system. The Garratt-type front end held half of the total supply of water and had the pivot of the front engine located ahead of the smokebox. A second long water tank rode under the boiler. The Fairlie back end featured a fixed chassis and a pivoting rear engine under the massive coal bunker.

Holland argues that adopting the long frame of the Fairlie design was intended to simplify mechanical-stoker operation. Alas for the U-boats, the original Duplex mechanical stoker was removed in 1937 and the crew fell to hand-firing because a) after all, the engines were only used for short runs on the Reef, and blockages in the stokers were difficult to clear. "It must have been heavy work," Holland adds sympathetically,"to hand-fire the sixty square feet of grate area."

Holland also comments: "These were large and powerful engines, and had they been built as pure Garratts it is possible they might still have been running today [1972]."


Class na -- 3'6"" (Locobase 762)

Described in Wiener (1930), but no record of works numbers. Preceded the orders to German builders for slightly larger engines. Used in fast passenger service.

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassFCFDGAGBGC
Locobase ID13,096 2484 745 748 749
RailroadSouth African RailwaysSouth African RailwaysSouth African RailwaysSouth African RailwaysSouth African Railways
CountrySouth AfricaSouth AfricaSouth AfricaSouth AfricaSouth Africa
Whyte2-6-2+2-6-22-6-2+2-6-22-6-0+0-6-22-6-2+2-6-22-6-2+2-6-2
Number in Class13166
Road Numbers670671-67416491650, 2160-21652180-2185
Gauge3'6""3'6""3'6""3'6""3'6""
Number Built13166
BuilderNorth BritishNorth BritishBeyer, PeacockBeyer, PeacockBeyer, Peacock
Year19251926192019211924
Valve GearWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)8 / 2.44 8.50 / 2.599 / 2.748 / 2.448 / 2.44
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)17.69 / 5.3918.62 / 5.6816.17 / 17.8617.42 / 5.3117.70 / 5.39
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.45 0.46 0.56 0.46 0.45
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)56.67 / 17.2758.58 / 17.8658.58 / 17.8653 / 16.1556.67 / 17.27
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)23,520 / 10,66927,664 / 12,54833,040 / 14,98717,920 / 812823,520 / 10,669
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)138,656 / 62,893163,184 / 74,019234,080 / 106,177106,176 / 48,161141,120 / 64,011
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)223,328255,584299,600170,352216,832
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)3600 / 13.644680 / 17.735520 / 17.422780 / 10.533000 / 11.36
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT) 5.50 / 5 5.50 / 5 9.50 / 8.60 5.50 / 5 5.60 / 5.10
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)39 / 19.5045 / 22.5065 / 32.5029 / 14.5039 / 19.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)42.75 / 108646 / 116848 / 121942 / 106742 / 1067
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)180 / 12.40180 / 12.40180 / 12.40180 / 12.40180 / 12.40
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)14" x 23" / 356x584 (4)15" x 24" / 381x610 (4)18" x 26" / 457x660 (4)12" x 20" / 305x508 (4)14" x 23" / 356x584 (4)
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)32,268 / 14636.5435,922 / 16293.9653,703 / 24359.3020,983 / 9517.7432,844 / 14897.81
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.30 4.54 4.36 5.06 4.30
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)155 / 14.41178 / 16.54211.30 / 19.64104 / 9.67156.80 / 14.57
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)34 / 3.1641 / 3.8151.80 / 4.8123 / 2.1434 / 3.16
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1387 / 128.901730 / 160.722555 / 237.451018 / 94.611423 / 132.25
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)280 / 26.02371 / 34.47527 / 48.98203 / 18.87247 / 22.96
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1667 / 154.922101 / 195.193082 / 286.431221 / 113.481670 / 155.21
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume169.23176.22166.83194.42173.63
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation61207380932441406120
Same as above plus superheater percentage7160870810,90948447038
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area32,64337,80744,50021,90232,458
Power L173278376785580986811
Power MT698.99678.96443.881008.87638.42

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassGCAGDGDAGE - 1st orderGE - 2nd order
Locobase ID755 751 756 4382 761
RailroadSouth African RailwaysSouth African RailwaysSouth African RailwaysSouth African RailwaysSouth African Railways
CountrySouth AfricaSouth AfricaSouth AfricaSouth AfricaSouth Africa
Whyte2-6-2+2-6-22-6-2+2-6-22-6-2+2-6-22-8-2+2-8-22-8-2+2-8-2
Number in Class3814569
Road Numbers2190-2202,2600-26252220-2223, 2228-22372255-22592260-22652266-2275
Gauge3'6""3'6""3'6""3'6""3'6""
Number Built3814569
BuilderKruppBeyer, PeacockLinke-HofmannBeyer, PeacockBeyer, Peacock
Year19281925192919251927
Valve GearWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)8 / 2.44 8.50 / 2.59 8.50 / 2.5913.25 / 4.0413.25 / 4.04
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)18.75 / 5.7118.75 / 5.7122.87 / 6.9722.87 / 6.97
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.45 0.45 0.58 0.58
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)56.67 / 17.2758.33 / 17.7858.33 / 17.7870 / 21.3470 / 21.34
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)26,432 / 11,98928,560 / 12,95530,688 / 13,92030,128 / 13,66630,128 / 13,666
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)149,744 / 67,923168,784 / 76,559178,192 / 80,827231,840 / 105,161231,840 / 105,161
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)236,992255,472268,016332,416332,416
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)3000 / 11.363800 / 14.394560 / 14.395520 / 17.424600 / 17.42
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)7 / 6.40 5.60 / 5.10 5.50 / 5 9.90 / 910.10 / 9.20
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)42 / 2147 / 23.5049 / 24.5048 / 2448 / 24
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)42.80 / 108745.50 / 115646 / 116846 / 116846 / 1168
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)180 / 12.40180 / 12.40180 / 12.40180 / 12.40180 / 12.40
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)14" x 23" / 356x584 (4)15" x 24" / 381x610 (4)15" x 24" / 381x610 (4)18" x 24" / 457x610 (4)18" x 24" / 457x610 (4)
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)32,230 / 14619.3036,316 / 16472.6835,922 / 16293.9651,727 / 23463.0051,727 / 23463.00
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.65 4.65 4.96 4.48 4.48
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)163 / 15.15167 / 15.52181 / 16.82215 / 19.98202 / 18.77
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)34 / 3.1640.40 / 3.7540 / 3.7252 / 4.8352 / 4.83
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1388 / 1291677 / 155.861750 / 162.642589 / 240.612576 / 239.41
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)331 / 30.76355 / 32.99370 / 34.39362 / 33.64349 / 32.43
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1719 / 159.762032 / 188.852120 / 197.032951 / 274.252925 / 271.84
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume169.36170.82178.25183.13182.21
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation61207272720093609360
Same as above plus superheater percentage72838508842410,48310,483
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area34,91535,17038,11943,34440,723
Power L181187935841367576567
Power MT717.11621.87624.52514.03499.58

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassGE - 3rd orderGEAGFGGGH
Locobase ID2907 768 765 750 13,099
RailroadSouth African RailwaysSouth African RailwaysSouth African RailwaysSouth African RailwaysSouth African Railways
CountrySouth AfricaSouth AfricaSouth AfricaSouth AfricaSouth Africa
Whyte2-8-2+2-8-24-8-2+2-8-44-6-2+2-6-42-6-2+2-6-24-6-2+2-6-4
Number in Class2506512
Road Numbers2276-22774001-40502370-243422902320-2321
Gauge3'6""3'6""3'6""3'6""3'6""
Number Built2506512
BuilderBeyer, PeacockBeyer, PeacockseveralBeyer, PeacockMaffei
Year19301946192819251928
Valve GearWalschaertStephensonStephensonWalschaertWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)13.25 / 4.0413.38 / 4.08 9.50 / 2.9010 / 3.0510.75 / 3.28
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)22.92 / 6.9928.33 / 8.6323.58 / 7.1925.17 / 7.67
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.58 0.47 0.40 0.43
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)70 / 21.3480.83 / 24.6469.75 / 21.2667.33 / 20.5276.58 / 23.34
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)29,456 / 13,36133,600 / 15,24131,808 / 14,42836,288 / 16,46040,544 / 18,390
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)230,160 / 104,399259,840 / 117,862162,400 / 73,663211,680 / 96,017240,800 / 109,225
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)331,296415,520326,032330,960413,840
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)4600 / 17.425600 / 21.214800 / 18.184600 / 17.427200 / 27.27
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT) 9.90 / 911 / 1011 / 1010 / 9.1014.90 / 13.50
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)48 / 2454 / 2745 / 22.5059 / 29.5067 / 33.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)46 / 116848 / 121954 / 137257 / 144860 / 1524
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)180 / 12.40200 / 13.80185 / 12.80180 / 12.40180 / 12.40
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)19" x 24" / 483x610 (4)18.5" x 26" / 470x660 (4)16" x 26" / 406x660 (4)18" x 26" / 457x660 (4)19.5" x 26" / 495x660 (4)
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)57,634 / 26142.3763,031 / 28590.4138,765 / 17583.5345,224 / 20513.2950,421 / 22870.61
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.99 4.12 4.19 4.68 4.78
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)229 / 21.28212 / 19.70199 / 18.49219 / 20.35239 / 22.21
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)52 / 4.8351.30 / 4.7744 / 4.0952 / 4.8360 / 5.58
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)2603 / 241.912540 / 236.062242 / 208.362589 / 240.612655 / 246.75
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)364 / 33.83470 / 43.68473 / 43.96362 / 33.64665 / 61.80
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)2967 / 275.743010 / 279.742715 / 252.322951 / 274.253320 / 308.55
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume165.25157.00185.27169.05147.71
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation936010,2608140936010,800
Same as above plus superheater percentage10,48311,902952410,48312,960
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area46,16649,18443,07444,15051,624
Power L16154774410,31177519849
Power MT471.58525.63839.85484.35541.03

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassGLGMGMA/GMAMGOHF
Locobase ID766 767 769 771 13,097
RailroadSouth African RailwaysSouth African RailwaysSouth African RailwaysSouth African RailwaysSouth African Railways
CountrySouth AfricaSouth AfricaSouth AfricaSouth AfricaSouth Africa
Whyte4-8-2+2-8-44-8-2+2-8-44-8-2+2-8-44-8-2+2-8-42-8-2+2-8-2
Number in Class8171202511
Road Numbers2350-23572291-23064051-41702572-25961380-1390
Gauge3'6""3'6""3'6""3'6""3'6""
Number Built8171202511
BuilderBeyer, PeacockBeyer, PeacockseveralHenschel & SohnHenschel & Sohn
Year19301938195219541927
Valve GearStephensonWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)13.25 / 4.0414.42 / 4.4015.75 / 4.8014.41 / 4.3912.75 / 3.89
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)27.67 / 8.4330.33 / 9.2430.33 / 9.2422.87 / 6.97
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.48 0.52 0.48 0.56
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)83.58 / 25.4886.33 / 26.3186.33 / 26.3186.33 / 26.3169.83 / 21.28
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)40,992 / 18,59433,600 / 15,24135,168 / 15,95230,016 / 13,61533,600 / 15,241
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)324,464 / 147,175257,824 / 116,947273,616 / 124,110245,504 / 111,359230,272 / 104,450
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)472,864390,432429,520392,448336,112
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)8400 / 31.821600 / 6.062100 / 7.955520 / 20.91
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)13.20 / 1211 / 1014 / 12.7012.10 / 11 7.70 / 7
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)68 / 3454 / 2757 / 28.5051 / 25.5048 / 24
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)48 / 121954 / 137254 / 137254 / 137246 / 1168
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)200 / 13.80200 / 13.80200 / 13.80200 / 13.80180 / 12.40
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)22" x 26" / 559x660 (4)20.5" x 26" / 521x660 (4)20.5" x 26" / 521x660 (4)18.5" x 26" / 470x660 (4)18" x 24" / 457x610 (4)
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)89,137 / 40431.9168,796 / 31205.3868,796 / 31205.3856,028 / 25413.9051,727 / 23463.00
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.64 3.75 3.98 4.38 4.45
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)347 / 32.25281 / 26.12237.20 / 22.04226 / 21209 / 19.42
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)75 / 6.9764 / 5.9563.20 / 5.8756.60 / 5.2653 / 4.93
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)3396 / 315.613066 / 284.943211 / 298.422625 / 243.962271 / 211.06
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)835 / 77.60778 / 72.30747 / 69.42546 / 50.74598 / 55.58
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)4231 / 393.213844 / 357.243958 / 367.843171 / 294.702869 / 266.64
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume148.44154.34161.64162.26160.64
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation15,00012,80012,64011,3209540
Same as above plus superheater percentage18,00015,36015,04213,24411,543
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area83,28067,44056,45452,88445,520
Power L1884410,39610,07696458491
Power MT480.74711.16649.49692.89650.34

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassNG.G 16NG.G 16NG.G 16NG.G11NG.G11
Locobase ID703 759 760 744 746
RailroadSouth African RailwaysSouth African RailwaysSouth African RailwaysSouth African RailwaysSouth African Railways
CountrySouth AfricaSouth AfricaSouth AfricaSouth AfricaSouth Africa
Whyte2-6-2+2-6-22-6-2+2-6-22-6-2+2-6-22-6-0+0-6-22-6-0+0-6-2
Number in Class718832
Road NumbersTC6-TC12/NGG 137-NGG143NG85-88, 109-116, 125-131NG149-NG156NG51-NG53NG54-NG55
Gauge2'2'2'2'2'
Number Built718832
BuilderBeyer, PeacockseveralHunslet Taylor, JohannesburgBeyer, PeacockBeyer, Peacock
Year19581937196719201925
Valve GearWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m) 6.24 / 1.9013.87 / 4.23 6.25 5.75 / 1.75 5.75 / 1.75
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)13.87 / 4.2343.25 / 13.1813.8739.75 / 12.1239.75 / 12.12
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.45 0.32 0.45 0.14 0.14
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)43.25 / 13.1843.2546 / 14.0246 / 14.02
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)15,456 / 701115,546 / 705215,344 / 696013,860 / 628714,762 / 6696
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)90,692 / 41,13787,696 / 39,77880,976 / 36,73084,464 / 38,312
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)139,328132,384139,328100,240108,976
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)2190 / 8.301825 / 6.911590 / 6.021620 / 6.14
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT) 6.94 / 6.30 4.40 / 4 6.60 / 6 2.80 / 2.50
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)25 / 12.5024 / 1222 / 1123 / 11.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)33 / 83833 / 83833 / 83830 / 76230 / 762
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)180 / 12.40180 / 12.40180 / 12.40180 / 12.40180 / 12.40
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)12" x 16" / 305x406 (4)12" x 16" / 305x406 (4)12" x 16" / 305x406 (4)10.5" x 16" / 267x406 (4)10.5" x 16" / 267x406 (4)
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)21,364 / 9690.5621,364 / 9690.5621,364 / 9690.5617,993 / 8161.5017,993 / 8161.50
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.25 4.10 4.50 4.69
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)82.10 / 7.6382.10 / 7.6375 / 6.9781 / 7.5380.60 / 7.49
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)19.50 / 1.8119.50 / 1.8119.20 / 1.7819.30 / 1.7919.50 / 1.81
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)921 / 85.56921 / 85.59920 / 85.50980 / 91.04742 / 68.96
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)149 / 13.84149 / 13.85147 / 13.66142 / 13.20
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1070 / 99.401070 / 99.441067 / 99.16980 / 91.04884 / 82.16
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume219.87219.87219.63305.58231.37
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation35103510345634743510
Same as above plus superheater percentage40014001394034744072
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area16,84716,84715,39014,58016,829
Power L163166316618838876800
Power MT921.21952.68634.961064.93

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassNG.G12NG.G13NG.G14Una -- 3'6""
Locobase ID754 753 757 13,098 762
RailroadSouth African RailwaysSouth African RailwaysSouth African RailwaysSouth African RailwaysSouth African Railways
CountrySouth AfricaSouth AfricaSouth AfricaSouth AfricaSouth Africa
Whyte2-6-2+2-6-22-6-2+2-6-22-6-2+2-6-22-6-2+2-6-24-6-2+2-6-4
Number in Class212110
Road NumbersNG56-NG57NG58-60, 49-50, 77-83NG841370-1379
Gauge2'2'2'3'6""3'6""
Number Built212110
BuilderFranco-Belge, La CroyereHanomagHanomagMaffeiBeyer, Peacock
Year19271927193019271925
Valve GearWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m) 5.75 / 1.7513.17 / 4.019 / 2.7422.86 / 6.97
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)12.62 / 3.8542.75 / 13.0319.67 / 670 / 21.34
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.46 0.31 0.46 0.33
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)40 / 12.1966.92 / 20.40
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)8400 / 381015,848 / 71898960 / 406441,664 / 18,898
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)50,400 / 22,86192,008 / 41,73452,976 / 24,030246,400 / 111,765227,920 / 103,383
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)80,640138,15284,560369,152323,792
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)1200 / 4.551825 / 6.911200 / 4.556340 / 24.024600 / 17.42
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT) 2.20 / 2 4.40 / 4 2.20 / 216.80 / 15.3010.10 / 9.20
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)14 / 726 / 1315 / 7.5068 / 3463 / 31.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)30 / 76232.80 / 83330 / 76248 / 121945.50 / 1156
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)180 / 12.40180 / 12.40180 / 12.40180 / 12.40180 / 12.40
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)8.5" x 16" / 216x406 (4)12" x 16" / 305x406 (4)9" x 16" / 229x406 (4)18.5" x 26" / 470x660 (4)18" x 24" / 457x610 (4)
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)11,791 / 5348.3121,495 / 9749.9813,219 / 5996.0456,728 / 25731.4252,296 / 23721.09
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.27 4.28 4.01 4.34 4.36
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)45 / 4.1882.10 / 7.6345 / 4.18220 / 20.45199 / 18.49
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)10.50 / 0.9819.50 / 1.8110.50 / 0.9860 / 5.5851.60 / 4.80
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)424 / 39.39921 / 85.59424 / 39.392806 / 260.782565 / 238.38
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)98 / 9.10149 / 13.8598 / 9.10633 / 58.83344 / 31.97
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)522 / 48.491070 / 99.44522 / 48.493439 / 319.612909 / 270.35
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume201.74219.87179.95173.45181.44
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation18903510189010,8009288
Same as above plus superheater percentage22494001224912,74410,403
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area963916,847963946,72840,118
Power L165566278584885486427
Power MT1720.65902.571460.20458.89373.00

Photos