Missouri-Kansas-Texas 2-8-2 "Mikado" Locomotives in the USA

The first "Mikados" to arrive on the Missouri-Kansas-Texas Railroad was a very large group received from the American Locomotive Company in 1913 and 1914. These locomotives, 70 in total, were designated as Class L-1 and were assigned road numbers 701-770. They had 61" drivers, 26 1/2" x 30" cylinders, a 195 psi boiler pressure and they exerted 57,250 pounds of tractive effort. Road numbers 701-760 (Class L-1-a) were coal burners and numbers 761-770 (Class L-1-b) burned oil.

In 1915, thirty-five more "Mikados" came from ALCO. This group was designated as Class L-2-a and was giver road numbers 801-835. These 2-8-2s had 61" drivers, 28" x 30" cylinders, a 195 psi boiler pressure and a tractive effort of 63,900 pounds. The last group to be built by ALCO followed this group in 1918. This group of 25 locomotives was designated as Class L-2-b and assigned road numbers 836-860. They were very similar to the L-2-a class expect they had a larger grate area. The 35 Class L-2-a locomotives had a tendency to be rough riding and they were poor steamers and were scrapped in 1934. The Class L-2-b locomotives were very similar but performed very well and lasted to the end of steam on the M-K-T.

In the early 1920s The Lima Locomotive Works built 60 "Mikados" for the M-K-T. Twenty were delivered in 1920 (Class L-2-c, road numbers 861-880) and the others came in 1923 (Class L-2-d, road numbers 881-920). These locomotives had 61" drivers, 28" x 30" cylinders, a 195 psi boiler pressure and they exerted 63,900 pounds of tractive effort. All but six of the Class L-2-c locomotives were built as oil burners and all had trailing truck boosters.

There are no surviving Katy 2-8-2 "Mikado" type locomotives.


Roster by Richard Duley

ClassQty.Road NumbersYear BuiltBuilderNotes
L-1-a60701-7601913-1914ALCO1
L-1-b10761-7701914ALCO2
L-2-a35801-8351915ALCO3
L-2-b25836-8601918ALCO2
L-2-c20861-8801920Lima4,5
L-2-d40881-9201923Lima4,6
Notes
  1. All built as Coal Burners
  2. All built as Oil Burners
  3. Because of poor performance all were scrapped in 1934
  4. All had a trailing truck booster.
  5. All but six were built as oil burners.
  6. All built as oil burner.

Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class L-1a/L-1b (Locobase 1366)

Data from MKT 1941 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. See also "Equipment and Supplies--Locomotive Building", Railway Age Gazette, Vol 53, No. 21 (22 November 1912), pp. 1011.

Sixty engines in the L-1a class delivered 1913-1914, 10 more in 1914. All fitted with Walschaert valve gear except for the last 10 -- 761-770 -- which had Baker gear.

The Railway Age's brief description including a list of suppliers of "special equipment", component manufacturers that give a snapshot of the complex of industries that supported US steam locomotive manufacture at its height. A comparison with a typical Baldwin list would suggest which suppliers might have been "captives" of one major builder or another and which served the industry in general. The latter group extractred from this list includes Westinghouse, American brick arch, Janney, Pyle-National, Nathan, and possibly Worth Brothers Steel.

Axles Cambria.

Bell ringer Gollmar

Brakes Westinghouse

Brake beams Waycott

Brake shoes Streeter

Brick arch American

Couplers Janney

Driving boxes Cast steel

Headlight Pyle-National Electric

Injector Nathan

Journal bearings Hewitt

Safety valve CoaIe

Sanding devices Handlan

Sight-feed lubricators Nathan

Springs Railway Steel Spring Co

Staying Tate, Rome Special

Steam gages' American

Superheater Schmidt

Tires Railway Steel Spring Co

Tubes Worth Bros

Valve gear Walschaert


Class L-2a (Locobase 1367)

Data from table in May 1916 issue of Railway Mechanical Engineer (RME).

These engines had a reputation for slipperiness and a rough ride. Consequently, they were scrapped early in 1934. One suspects the relatively high ratio of boiler to grate may have had something to do with their unpopularity; the similar L-2bs, which had a larger firebox, lasted until the 1950s.


Class L-2b (Locobase 1368)

Data from 1933 MKT locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

Although apparently similar to the L-2a, these engines had a larger firebox. It's likely that Alco heard an earful about the L-2a's bad riding qualities and fixed them because the L-2bs lasted until the 1950s.


Class L-2c/L-2d (Locobase 1369)

Data from MKT 5 - 1939 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Works numbers were 5940-5959 in 1920.

Follow-ons to the successful L-2bs that were virtually identical, but put 5 more tons total on the lead and traling trucks. Like the earlier locomotives, these had 14" (356 mm) piston valves.

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassL-1a/L-1bL-2aL-2bL-2c/L-2d
Locobase ID1366 1367 1368 1369
RailroadMissouri-Kansas-Texas (MKT)Missouri-Kansas-Texas (MKT)Missouri-Kansas-Texas (MKT)Missouri-Kansas-Texas (MKT)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-22-8-22-8-22-8-2
Number in Class70352560
Road Numbers701-770801-835836-860861-920
GaugeStdStdStdStd
Number Built70352560
BuilderAlcoAlco-SchenectadyAlco-SchenectadyLima
Year1913191519181920
Valve GearBaker or WalschaertBakerWalschaertWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)16.50 / 5.0316.50 / 5.0316.50 / 5.0316.50 / 5.03
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)35.08 / 10.6934.83 / 10.6235.67 / 10.8736.42 / 11.10
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.47 0.47 0.46 0.45
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)70.61 / 21.5269.90 / 21.3172.49 / 22.0972.50 / 22.10
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)214,500 / 97,296233,500 / 105,914234,000 / 106,141234,000 / 106,141
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)287,500 / 130,408314,000 / 142,428315,000 / 142,882324,000 / 146,964
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)168,000 / 76,204165,100 / 74,888174,500 / 79,152192,600 / 87,362
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)455,500 / 206,612479,100 / 217,316489,500 / 222,034516,600 / 234,326
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)8000 / 30.308000 / 30.3010,000 / 37.8810,000 / 37.88
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)2990 / 11.3012.50 / 11.404000 / 15.204000 / 15.20
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)89 / 44.5097 / 48.5098 / 4998 / 49
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)61 / 154961 / 154961 / 154961 / 1549
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)195 / 13.40185 / 12.80195 / 13.40195 / 13.40
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)26.5" x 30" / 673x76228" x 30" / 711x76228" x 30" / 711x76228" x 30" / 711x762
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)57,245 / 25965.9360,631 / 27501.7963,909 / 28988.6763,909 / 28988.67
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.75 3.85 3.66 3.66
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)250 / 23.23247 / 22.96249 / 23.14254 / 23.61
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)57.50 / 5.3462.70 / 5.8370.40 / 6.5470.40 / 6.54
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)3628 / 337.174341 / 403.444179 / 388.384191 / 389.50
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)887 / 82.431025 / 95.261112 / 103.351055 / 98.05
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)4515 / 419.605366 / 498.705291 / 491.735246 / 487.55
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume189.44203.04195.46196.02
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation11,21311,60013,72813,728
Same as above plus superheater percentage13,45513,80316,61116,474
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area58,50054,37758,75259,436
Power L113,31413,02114,30913,868
Power MT547.36491.76539.25522.63