Big Four / Indiana Harbor Belt / Kanawha & Michigan / Lake Shore & Michigan Southern / Michigan Central / New York Central / Pittsburgh & Lake Erie / Pittsburgh, McKeesport & Youghiogeny 2-8-2 "Mikado" Locomotives in the USA

New York Central

Mikados were built from the early 1900s to as late as the mid 1940s in Canada, although the vast majority came into service prior to 1930. The railroad owning the largest number of Mikados (1,350 system wide) was the New York Central (which was also the largest owner of 0-8-0 switchers, 4-8-2 "Mohawks" and 4-6-4 "Hudsons"). As of January 1, 1946, the system had 921 2-8-2s on its roster.

That 1946 roster of 2-8-2s was broken down as follows:

Many years ago in TRAINS, an unknown person surveyed all Mikados contemporary with the H10 and discovered a secret: Lima had given the H10 double the superheating surface of then other classes. A few years later, Andre Chapelon did pretty much the same thing in France, and has been hailed as a genius ever since. Outside of that, the Lima design was an upgrade of the existing H7 2-8-2, a design that might be called average, if not mediocre. As an interesting sidelight, the Lima designer, Will Woodard, had earlier drawn up plans for a "Super-Power" 2-8-4 based on the USRA light design.

There are no surviving NYC 2-8-2 "Mikado" type locomotives.

Boston & Albany

The New York Central rebuilt 482 of its Class G-5, 2-8-0 locomotives into 2-8-2 "Mikado" type locomotives. Most of these locomotives were rebuilt between 1913 and 1915. The Baldwin Locomotive Works converted five of them, the Lima Locomotive Works rebuilt ten, the NYC West Albany Shops rebuilt nineteen and the American Locomotive Company's Brooks Works reworked 448 of them. The NYC designated these new "Mikados" as Class H-5. One assumes that because the rebuilt 2-8-2s were former Class G-5 as 2-8-0s that they became Class H-5 as 2-8-2s. In addition to the converted 2-8-2s, ALCO and Lima delivered a total of 179 new Class H-5 locomotives. All 661 of the locomotives had 63" diameter drivers, 25" x 32" cylinders, a 180 psi boiler pressure and they exerted 48,570 pounds of tractive effort.

The Boston & Albany Railroad received ten of the rebuilt locomotives in 1925. The group was built by ALCO and designated as Class H-5g and assigned road numbers 1214-1223. During 1913 and 1914 the B&A took delivery of 14 new 2-8-2s, which were built by ALCO and designated as Class H-5j. These locomotives were given road numbers 1200-1213.

In 1922, Lima delivered an experimental 2-8-2 locomotive to the NYC, which was a heavier Class than those in current use that could deliver 4470 pounds more tractive effort and was also equipped with a booster, which added another 11,000 pounds of tractive force. This locomotive was designated as Class H-10 and was given road number 8000.

Satisfied with the H-10 the NYC ordered 200 more of them. Eight of these Class H-10s were delivered to the B&A in 1923. These locomotives were built by ALCO, were designated as Class H-10a and assigned road numbers 183-190.

There were also six other Lima-built Class H-5 "Mikados" on the B&A. They were transferred from the NYC&HR during 1939-1941 and were designated as Class H-5t and assigned road numbers 1224-1229.

There are no surviving B&A 2-8-2 "Mikado" type locomotives.

Lake Shore & Michigan Southern

The Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Railway Company was formed in 1869, under the laws of the States of New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Michigan and Illinois, by the consolidation of The Michigan Southern and Northern Indiana Railroad Company with a line from Chicago to Toledo, The Lake Shore Railway Company with a line from Toledo to Erie, and The Buffalo and Erie Railroad Company with a line from Erie to Buffalo. The two first named companies were consolidated on April 6, 1869, under the name of The Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Railway Company, and this company was, on June 22, 1869, consolidated with The Buffalo and Erie Railroad Company, retaining the former name. 1871-2 the following branch mileage was constructed: Sandusky to Oak Harbor, 34.70 miles; Ashtabula to Jamestown, 36.09 miles; and from Sandusky Junction to Old Pier Depot, 3.74 miles.

In 1903, a low grade line was constructed between Plymouth (now Carson), Ohio, and Brookfield, Ohio, 42.59 miles, of which 18.10 miles were built by The Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Railway Company and 24.49 miles by The Mahoning Coal Railroad Company.

The American Locomotive Company delivered 70 "Mikados" to the NYC during 1912 and 1913. Thirty-five of them went to the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern and Thirty-five went to the Michigan Central. Ten of the LS&MS locomotives were delivered in 1912 and were designated as Class H-7a and assigned road numbers 4000-4009. The other 25 were delivered during 1912-1913, were designated as Class H-7b and assigned road numbers 4010-4034. All 70 of these locomotives had 63" drivers, 27" x 30" cylinders, a 190 psi boiler pressure and they exerted 56,100 pounds of tractive effort. By 1917, the 25 designated as Class H-7b were transferred to the Michigan Central and later renumbered NYC road numbers 2035-2059.

There are no surviving Lake Shore & Michigan Southern 2-8-2 "Mikado" type locomotives.

Michigan Central

The American Locomotive Company delivered 70 "Mikados" to the NYC during 1912 and 1913. Thirty-five of them went to the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern and Thirty-five went to the Michigan Central. The Michigan Central locomotives were designated as Class H-7 and were assigned road numbers 7900-7934. They had 63" drivers, 27" x 30" cylinders, a 190 psi boiler pressure and they exerted 56,100 pounds of tractive effort.

In 1918, the USRA allocated 194 "Mikado-Light" locomotives to the NYC. The MC received 20 of them. They were designated as Class H-6a and were given road numbers 7970-7989.

ALCO delivered 60 more 2-8-2s to the NYC in 1920. Ten of these locomotives went to the MC and were similar to the previous Class H-7 except they had a 200 psi boiler pressure and exerted 59,000 pounds of tractive effort. They were designated as Class H-7e and were given road numbers 7960-7969.

In 1922, the Lima Locomotive Works delivered an experimental 2-8-2 locomotive, which was a heavier Class H-7e that could deliver 4470 pounds more tractive effort and was also equipped with a booster, which added another 11,000 pounds of tractive force. This locomotive was designated as Class H-10 and was given road number 8000.

Satisfied with the H-10 the NYC ordered 200 more of them. Fifteen of these Class H-10s were delivered to the MC during 1923 and 1924. They were designated as Class H-10b and were assigned road numbers 237-251.

There are no surviving Michigan Central 2-8-2 "Mikado" type locomotives.

Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis (Big Four)

The New York Central rebuilt 482 of its Class G-5, 2-8-0 locomotives into 2-8-2 "Mikado" type locomotives. Most of these locomotives were rebuilt between 1913 and 1915. Baldwin converted five of them, Lima rebuilt ten, the NYC West Albany Shops rebuilt nineteen and ALCO - Brooks Works reworked 448 of them. The NYC designated these new "Mikados" as Class H-5. One assumes that because the rebuilt 2-8-2s were former Class G-5 as 2-8-0s that they became Class H-5 as 2-8-2s. In addition to the converted 2-8-2s, ALCO and Lima delivered a total of 179 new Class H-5 locomotives. All 661 of the locomotives had 63" diameter drivers, 25" x 32" cylinders, a 205 psi boiler pressure, they exerted 55,317 pounds of tractive effort and each weighed 294,700 pounds. The rebuilt locomotives had a firebox of 230 square feet, an evaporative heating surface of 3,777 square feet and with the superheater the combined heating surface was 4,659 square feet. The new locomotives built by Lima had a firebox of 230 square feet, an evaporative heating surface of 4,031 square feet and with the superheater the combined heating surface was 4,901 square feet.

The Cleveland Cincinnati Chicago & St. Louis received 109 of the rebuilt locomotives in three groups. They were designated as Class H-5l and were assigned road numbers 6000-6063, 6125-6149 and 6698 ….6722. There were also 25 new Class H-5 "Mikados" and five of them were designated as Class H-5s and assigned road numbers 6064-6068 and the others were designated as Class H-5t and assigned road numbers 6064-6988.

The USRA allocated 194 "Mikado-Light" locomotives to the NYC. The CCC&StL received 25 of them in 1918. These locomotives were built by the Baldwin Locomotive Works and were designated as Class H-6a and given road numbers 6089-6113. They had 63" diameter drivers, 26" x 30" cylinders, a 200 psi boiler pressure and they exerted 54,725 pounds of tractive effort and each weighed 292,000 pounds. The firebox was 280 square feet, the evaporative heating surface was 3,777 square feet and with the superheater the combined heating surface was 4,659 square feet.

In 1922, the Lima Locomotive Works delivered an experimental 2-8-2 locomotive, which was a heavier Class H-7e that could deliver 4486 pounds more tractive effort and was also equipped with a booster, which added another 11,000 pounds of tractive force. This locomotive was designated as Class H-10 and was given road number 8000.

Satisfied with the H-10 the NYC ordered 200 more of them. Seventy-five of these Class H-10s were delivered to the CCC&St.L between 1922 and 1924. There were 50 of them built by ALCO that were designated as Class H-10a and assigned road numbers 133-182 and there were 25 built by Lima that were designated as Class H-10b and assigned road numbers 212-236. These locomotives had 63" diameter drivers, 28" x 30" cylinders, a 200 psi boiler pressure and they exerted 63,467 pounds of tractive effort. The ALCO-built locomotives weighed 334,000 pounds and the Lima-built locomotives weighed 334,500 pounds. All of Class H-10a and H-10b locomotives had a firebox of 257 square feet, an evaporative heating surface was 4,415 square feet and with the superheater the combined heating surface was 6.195 square feet.

There are no surviving CCC&StL 2-8-2 "Mikado" type locomotives.

Kanawha & Michigan

The Kanawha and Michigan Railroad completed its rail line between Point Pleasant, WV and Charleston in Kanawha County, WV in 1892. A year later the K&M completed an extension of the its rail line to Gauley Bridge,WV. The completion of a bridge in 1893 by the Chesapeake & Ohio Railway across the New River, at Gauley, provided the K&M a link with the C&O, at K&M Junction, near Gauley Bridge, WV.

In 1910, the C&O bought control interest of the K&M, planning to use it to connect the C&O with the Great Lakes area, but anti-trust laws soon forced the C&O to abandon its K&M interests. In 1922, the K&M leased its line to the New York Central System, and eventually it became a part of the NYC.

When the Kanawha & Michigan Railroad decided to buy "Mikado" type locomotives it decided to use tank type locomotives. The first to arrive were a pair built by the American Locomotive Company and delivered in 1902. They were assigned road numbers 555 & 556. These locomotives had 49" diameter drivers, 19"x 26"cylinders, a 200 psi boiler pressure, they exerted 32,564 pounds of tractive effort and each weighed 216,000 pounds. The firebox was 165 square feet, and the evaporative heating surface was 2,493 square feet. In 1907, another ALCO-built tank locomotive of the same design of the 1902 locomotives was delivered and given road number 557.

In 1912, another two tank "Mikados" were delivered by ALCO which and were given road number 558 & 559. These locomotives had 49" diameter drivers, 19"x 26"cylinders, a 200 psi boiler pressure, they exerted 32,564 pounds of tractive effort and each weighed 234,000 pounds. The firebox was 165 square feet, and the evaporative heating surface was 2,493 square feet.

There are no surviving K&M 2-8-2T "Mikado" type locomotives as they were all scrapped by 1937.

Pittsburgh & Lake Erie

The Pittsburgh & Lake Erie Railroad was chartered in 1875, and in 1889, it came under the control of the New York Central and was then operated it as part of the NYC system. The original line ran from Youngstown at Haselton, Ohio to 24th street Pittsburgh, PA near the Smithfield Street Bridge and the Jones and Laughlin Iron Works, opened in 1879.

The P&LE followed the Monongahela River to the Golden Triangle, then the Ohio River northwest to Beaver, Pennsylvania. From there it follows the Beaver River to New Castle, Pennsylvania, then the Mahoning River, and finally crossing into Ohio just below Lowellsville, Pennsylvania to Youngstown at Haselton, Ohio.

The first "Mikado" type locomotives to arrive on the Pittsburgh & Lake Erie were the five that were built by the American Locomotive Company and delivered in 1916. They were designated as Class H-8a and were given road numbers 9500 through 9504. These locomotives had 57" diameter drivers, 26.5" x 30" cylinders, a 190 psi boiler pressure, they exerted 59,691 pounds of tractive effort and each weighed 320,500 pounds. The firebox was 278 square feet, the evaporative heating surface was 4,740 square feet and with the superheater the combined heating surface was 5,824 square feet. Four years later ALCO built and delivered five more 2-8-2 which were very similar to the Class H-8a locomotives it delivered in 1916. These locomotives were designated as Class H-8b and were assigned road numbers 9520 through 9524.

In 1919, the USRA allocated fifteen "Mikado-Heavy" locomotives to the P&LE. Five were built by ALCO and designated as Class H-9b and were given road numbers 9505 through 9509. The other ten were built by the Baldwin Locomotive Works and designated as Class H-9d with road numbers 9510 through 9519. These locomotives had 63" diameter drivers, 27" x 32" cylinders, a 190 psi boiler pressure, they exerted 59,801 pounds of tractive effort and each weighed 331,000 pounds. The firebox was 307 square feet, the evaporative heating surface was 4,085 square feet and with the superheater the combined heating surface was 5,278 square feet.

In 1923, the New York Central began to receive new "Mikados" which were built by the Lima Locomotive Works and the American locomotive Company. These locomotives were of the design developed by Lima's mechanical engineer William E. Woodard. He made a number of significant changes to maximize a steam locomotive's capacity to generate and utilize steam which made the locomotive significantly more powerful and faster. Woodard used an H-10 experimental heavy 2-8-2 which was designed for the Michigan Central and applying both relatively new science, every efficiency-enhancing tool available, a larger firebox, increased superheat, a feedwater heater, improved draughting, higher boiler pressure, streamlined steam passages and a trailing-truck booster engine, and by applying limited cutoff to prevent locomotive engineers from using excessive steam at starting. This design was demonstrated to be 26% more efficient overall than its immediate predecessor, and the NYC bought 301 copies.

In 1923, ALCO delivered ten locomotives of this new design which were designated as Class H-10a and given roads numbers 191 through 200. The locomotives had 63" diameter drivers, 28" x 30" cylinders, a 210 psi boiler pressure, they exerted 66,640 pounds of tractive effort and each weighed 334,000 pounds. The firebox was 291 square feet, the evaporative heating surface was 4,578 square feet and with the superheater the combined heating surface was 6,358 square feet.

In 1924, eleven more ALCO-built "Mikados" came from ALCO. This group was designated as Class H-10b and assigned road numbers 201 through 211. These locomotives had 63" diameter drivers, 28" x 30" cylinders, a 200 psi boiler pressure, they exerted 63,467 pounds of tractive effort and each weighed 334,500 pounds. The firebox was 291 square feet, the evaporative heating surface was 4,578 square feet and with the superheater the combined heating surface was 6,358 square feet.

There are no surviving Pittsburgh & Lake Erie 2-8-2 "Mikado" type locomotives.

Pittsburgh, McKeesport & Youghiogheny

The Pittsburgh, McKeesport and Youghiogheny Railroad incorporated August 3, 1881, under the general laws of the State of Pennsylvania. The road extends from the terminus of the Pittsburgh and Lake Erie Railroad in Pittsburgh, PA at 24th street to Connellsville, PA. The railroad followed the Monongahela River to McKeesport, PA, then the Youghiogheny River to Connellsville, PA.

From Connellsville the line was extended with braches to 88.9 through construction of it own tracks and in1890 it acquired the McKeesport & Belle Vernon Railroad Company giving the PMcK&Y a total of 116.2 miles of track.

It was leased to the Pittsburgh and Lake Erie Railroad Company, on January 1, 1884, for a term of nine hundred and ninety-nine years from August 3, 1881. Under the terms of the lease The Pittsburgh and Lake Erie Railroad Company and The Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Railway Company guarantee six percent interest on the bonds, and six percent per annum dividend on its capital stock. The property of the Pittsburgh, McKeesport and Youghiogheny was operated by the Pittsburgh and Lake Erie during its entire life.

The Pittsburgh, McKeesport and Youghiogheny Railroad received its first "Mikado" type locomotives in 1916 with the arrival of five of them which were designated as Class H-8a and assigned road numbers 9550b through 9554. They were joined in 1917, by another batch of twenty designated as Class H-8b with road numbers 9555 through 9574 assigned and a final group of five designated as Class H-8c which were given road numbers 9575 through 9579 were delivered in 1918. All thirty were built by the American Locomotive Company These Class H-8 locomotives had 57" diameter drivers, 26.5" x 30" cylinders, a 190 psi boiler pressure, they exerted 56,691 pounds of tractive effort and each weighed 320,500 pounds. The firebox was 278 square feet, the evaporative heating surface was 4,740 square feet and with the superheater the combined heating surface was 5,824 square feet.

In 1918, the USRA allocated ten "Mikado-Heavy" locomotives to the PMcK&Y. They were delivered in 1918 and were designated as Class H-9a and assigned road numbers 9580 through 9589. There was another five allocated and delivers in 1919. This group was designated as Class H-9c and given road numbers 9590 through 9594. All fifteen were built by the American Locomotive Company. The locomotives had had 63" diameter drivers, 27" x 33" cylinders, a 190 psi boiler pressure, they exerted 59,801 pounds of tractive effort and each weighed 331,000 pounds. The firebox was 307 square feet, the evaporative heating surface was 4,285 square feet and with the superheater the combined heating surface was 5,278 square feet.

There are no surviving Pittsburgh, McKeesport & Youghiogheny 2-8-2 "Mikado" type locomotives.

Toledo & Ohio Central

In 1900, the Toledo & Ohio Central Railroad gained control of the Kanawha & Michigan and the Kanawha & West Virginia Railroad. In 1910, the New York Central gained control of the Toledo & Ohio Central, into which it merged the K&M, the K&WV, and several other railroads in 1938. The Toledo & Ohio Central was finally merged into the New York Central System in 1952.

The USRA allocated 194 .Mikado-Light. locomotives to the NYC. The T&OC received fifteen of them in 1918. They were designated as Class H-6a and given road numbers 9732-9746. These ALCO-built locomotives had 63. diameter drivers, 26. x 30. cylinders, a 200 psi boiler pressure and they exerted 54,700 pounds of tractive effort and each weighed 292,000 pounds.

There are no surviving Toledo & Ohio Central 2-8-2 .Mikado. type locomotives.


Roster by Richard Duley

ClassQtyRoad NumbersLater NumbersYear BuiltBuilderNotes
H-5a-e1223600-37211912ALCO 
H-5p, q23722, 37231925ALCO 
H-5h503725-37741913ALCO 
H-5f, k563775-38301913-1914ALCO 
H-5m, n223831-38521914ALCO 
H-5p823853-39341915-1918ALCO 
H-5t503935-39841916Lima 
H-5p454071-41151915-1916ALCO 
H-5l94116-41241913ALCO 
H-6a505100-51491918ALCO11 to PM
H-6a455150-51941918-1919LimaUSRA
H-10a651-651922-1923Lima 
H-10a5766-1221922-1923ALCO 
H-10a10123-1321922-1923Lima 
H-10b50320-3691924ALCO 
H-5l646000 - 60631502 - 15631913 - 1915ALCORebuilt from Class G-5 2-8-0 locomotives
H-5s,t256064 - 60881564 - 15881916Lima 
H-5l256125 - 61491485 - 15011913ALCORebuilt from Class G-5 2-8-0 locomotives
H-5l256698 - 67221625 - 16491913 - 1915ALCORebuilt from Class G-5 2-8-0 locomotives
H-6a256089 - 61131700 - 17241918BaldwinUSRA allocated "Mikado-Light" locomotives
H-7e506150 - 61991950 - 19991920ALCOOn May 2, 1957, at Cincinnati, OH 2-8-2 number 1977 became the last steam locomotive to work for the New York Central.
H-7e18000 1922LimaExperimental
H-10a50133 - 182 1922 - 1923ALCO 
H-10b25212 - 236 1923 - 1924Lima 

Boston & Albany

ClassQty.Road NumbersFrom Other RRYear AcquiredYear BuiltBuilderNotes
H-5j 61200-12051913ALCO1
H-5j 81206-12131914ALCO2
H-5g101214-12231915ALCO3
H-5t 61224-1229NYC&HR1939-19411916Lima4
H-10a 8183-1901923ALCO5
Notes:
  1. Numbers 1200-1205 scrapped between 1950 and 1955
  2. Number 1212 scrapped in 1940. All the others scrapped between 1950 and 1953.
  3. Number 1223 scrapped in 1939. Number 1222 scrapped in 1942. Number 1215 scrapped in 1949. Number 1222 sold to the Duluth South Shore & Atlantic in 1942 and became number 1054. All the others scraped between 1950 and 1955.
  4. Numbers 1224-1229 transferred from the NYC&HR.. Ex NYC&HR numbers 1463, 1480, 1453, 1462, 1464 and 1441 in that order. Numbers 1224-1229 scrapped between 1952 and 1955.
  5. Numbers 183-190 scrapped between 1951 and 1953.

Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis

ClassQty.Road NumbersLater NumbersYear BuiltBuilderNotes
H-5l 1600015001914ALCO1
H-5l 1600115011913ALCO2
H-5l 26002-60031502-15031914ALCO3
H-5l 1600415041913ALCO4
H-5l 36005-60071505-15071914ALCO5
H-5l 26008-60091508-15091913ALCO6
H-5l106010-60191510-15191914Lima7
H-5l136020-60321520-15261913ALCO8
H-5l206033-60521533-15361914ALCO9
H-5l116053-60631553-15631915ALCO10
H-5s, t256064-60881564-15881916Lima11
H-5l256125-61491485-15011913ALCO12
H-5l256698 ….67221625 ….16491913-1915ALCO13
H-6a256089-61131700-17241918Baldwin14
H-7e506150-61991950-19991920ALCO15
H-10a25133-157133-1571922ALCO16
H-10a25158-182158-1821923ALCO17
H-10b25212-236212-2361924Lima18
Notes:
  1. Number 6000 rebuilt from Class G-5 2-8-0 locomotive scrapped in 1936.
  2. Number 6001 rebuilt from Class G-5 2-8-0 locomotive scrapped in 1951.
  3. Rebuilt from Class G-5 2-8-0 locomotives. Number 6003 scrapped in 1949. Number 6002 scrapped in 1952.
  4. Number 6004 rebuilt from Class G-5 2-8-0 locomotive scrapped in 1953.
  5. Rebuilt from Class G-5 2-8-0 locomotives. Number 6007 scrapped in 1940. Numbers 6005 and 6006 scrapped in 1952.
  6. Rebuilt from Class G-5 2-8-0 locomotives. Number 6009 scrapped in 1936. Number 6008 scrapped in 1951.
  7. Rebuilt from Class G-5 2-8-0 locomotives. Number 6014 sold to the Tennessee, Alabama & Georgia in 1936 and became TA&G number 302. Numbers 6010, 6012, 6013, 6016 and 6019 scrapped in 1936. Number 6015 scrapped in 1940. Number 6011 scrapped in 1941. Number 6017 scrapped in 1950. Number 6018 scrapped in 1953.
  8. Rebuilt from Class G-5 2-8-0 locomotives. Numbers 6027-6032 scrapped in 1935. Number 6021 scrapped in 1949. Numbers 6020 and 6022-6025 scrapped in 1951. Number 6026 scrapped in 1953.
  9. Rebuilt from Class G-5 2-8-0 locomotives. Numbers 6036, 6040, 6041, 6043, 6044, 6050 and 6051 scrapped in 1936. Number 6045 sold to the Georgia Railroad in 1937 and became GA number 305. Number 6035 sold to the Atlanta, Birmingham & Coast in 1939 and became AB&C number 228. Number 6034 scrapped in 1942. Numbers 6037 and 6038 scrapped in 1949. Number 6048 scrapped in 1950. Numbers 6046, 6047 and 6052 scrapped in 1951. Numbers 6037, 6039 and 6042 scrapped in 1952. Number 6049 scrapped in 1953.
  10. Number 6054 sold to the Georgia Railroad in 1937 and became GA number 306. Number 6057 sold to the Tennessee Central in 1937 and became TC number 730. Numbers 6055 and 6056 sold to the Atlanta, Birmingham & Coast in 1938 and became AB&C numbers 225 and 226. Number 6061 sold to the Atlanta, Birmingham & Coast in 1938 and became AB&C number 230. Number 6063 sold to the Tennessee Central in 1938 and became TC number 729. Numbers 6058, 6059 and 6060 scrapped in 1940. Number 6053 scrapped in 1949. Number 6062 scrapped in 1954.
  11. Rebuilt from Class G-5 2-8-0 locomotives. Number 6065 scrapped in 1940. Numbers 6067 and 6073 scrapped in 1949. All the others scrapped between 1951 and 1957.
  12. Rebuilt from Class G-5 2-8-0 locomotives. Numbers 6125-6149 transferred from the LS&MS in 1919, Ex LS&MS numbers 4125-4149. Number 6147 sold to the Tennessee, Alabama & Georgia in 1935 and became TA&G number 301. Numbers 6126, 6130, 6133, 6134, 6138, 6140, 6143 and 6145 scrapped in 1935. Numbers 6132 and 6135 scrapped in 1936. Numbers 6127, 6128 and 6144 transferred to the Peoria & Eastern in 1937 and became P&E numbers 32-34. P&E number 32 scrapped in 1940. P&E numbers 33 and 34 scrapped in 1951 and 1950. Number 6148 sold to the Atlanta, Birmingham & Coast in 1939 and became AB&C number 231. Numbers 6129 and 6139 scrapped in 1949. Number 6136 scrapped in 1950. Number 6141 scrapped in 1951. Numbers 6131, 6137, 6142, 6146 and 6149 scrapped in 1952.
  13. Twenty 2-8-2 locomotives rebuilt from Class G-5 2-8-0 locomotives. Numbers 6698, 6699, 6700, 6704, 6705, 6707, 6708, 6710, 6712, 6713, 6718, 6719, 6720 and 6721 built in 1914. Numbers 6702, 6706, 6709, 6714, 6717 and 6722 built in 1915.
  14. USRA allocated "Mikado-Light" locomotives. Numbers 6699, 6705 and 6718 scrapped in 1936. Number 6706 sold to the Tennessee, Alabama & Georgia in 1936 and became TA&G number 303. Number 6714 and 6721 transferred to the Peoria & Eastern in 1937 and became P&E numbers 35 and 37. P&E numbers 35 and 37 scrapped in 1951. Number 6717 sold to the Tennessee Central in 1938 and became TC number 728. Number 6700 scrapped in 1940. Numbers 6698, 6707 and 6713 scrapped in 1949. Numbers 6708 and 6709 scrapped in 1950. Numbers 6702 and 6720 scrapped in 1951. Numbers 6704, 6710, 6712, 6719 and 6722 scrapped in 1952.
  15. Numbers 6150-6199 scrapped between 1954 and 1959 except number 6194 was scrapped in 1944. On May 2, 1957, at Cincinnati, Ohio 2-8-2 number 1977 (former number 6177) became the last steam locomotive to run on the New York Central Lines.
  16. Numbers 133-157 scrapped between 1950 and 1953.
  17. Numbers 158-182 scrapped between 1950 and 1953 except number 179 was transferred to the P&LE in 1950 and became P&LE number 215. P&LE number 215 scrapped in 1954.
  18. Numbers 212-236 scrapped between 1950 and 1954 except numbers 229 and 235 transferred to the P&LE in 1950 and became P&LE numbers 212 and 216.

Kanawha & Michigan

Qty.Road NumbersNYC Class NYC NumbersYear BuiltBuilderNotes
2555-556Hxa9500-95011902ALCO1
1557Hxa95021907ALCO2
2558-559Hxb9503-95041912ALCO3
Notes:
  1. Tank locomotives. Numbers 555 & 556 renumbered 9500-9501 in 1924. Number 9500 scrapped in 1932. Number 9501 renumbered 7180 in 1936 and then scrapped in 1937.
  2. Tank locomotive. Number 557 renumbered 9502 in 1924 and then scrapped in 1932.
  3. Tank Locomotives. Numbers 558 & 559 renumbered 9503 & 9504 in 1924 and then scrapped in 1934.

Pittsburgh & Lake Erie

ClassQty.Road NumbersYear BuiltBuilderNotes
H-8a59500-95041916ALCO1
H-9b59505-95091919ALCO2
H-9d109510-95191919Baldwin3
H-8d59520-95241920ALCO4
H-10a10191-2001923ALCO5
H-10b11201-2111924ALCO6
Notes:
  1. Numbers 9500 & 9501 were sold to Lake Erie & Eastern in 1928 and then to the Monongahela in 1941 and became Monongahela numbers 189 and 190. Number 9502 was sold to the Monongahela in 1944 and became Monongahela number 193. Numbers 9503 & 9504 were sold to Cambria & Indiana in 1944 and became C&I numbers 24 and 25.
  2. Numbers 9505-9509 were USRA allocated "Mikado-Heavy" locomotives. Number 9509 was scrapped in 1947. All the others were scrapped between 1950 and 1952.
  3. Numbers 9510-9519 were USRA allocated "Mikado-Heavy" locomotives. Number 9519 was scrapped in 1948. All the others were scrapped between 1950 and 1952.
  4. Numbers 9520-9522 were sold to the Monongahela in 1940 and became Monongahela numbers 186, 187 and 188. Numbers 9523 & 9524 were sold to the Cambria & Indiana in 1939 and became C&E numbers 20 & 21.
  5. Numbers 191-200 were scrapped between 1951 and 1953.
  6. Numbers 201-211 were scrapped between 1953 and 1954.

Pittsburgh, Mckeesport & Youghiogheny

ClassQty.Road NumbersYear BuiltBuilderNote
H-8a 59550-95541916ALCO1
H-8b209555-95741917ALCO2
H-8c 59575-95791918ALCO3
H-9a109580-95891918ALCO4
H-9c 59590-95941919ALCO5
Notes:
  1. Numbers 9550 and 9551 sold to the Monongahela in 1944 and became Monongahela numbers 191 and 192. Number 9552 sold in 1939 and became Algiers, Winslow & Western number 9552. Numbers 9553 and 1954 sold to the NdeM in 1945 and became numbers 4100 and 4101.
  2. Numbers 9555, 9556, 9557, 9562, 9565, 9566, 9567, 9570, 9572 and 9573 sold to the NdeM in 1945 and became NdeM numbers 4107, 4115, 4113, 4108-4112, 4114 and 4116 in that order. Numbers 9558, 9559, 9561, 9563, 9564, 9568 and 9571 sold to the Monongahela in 1947-1948 and became Monongahela numbers 199, 200, 196, 194, 197, 198 and 195 in that order. Number 9574 was sold in 1946 and number 9560 was sold in 1948 to the Northwestern Railway of Mexico and became numbers 101 and 100. Number 9569 scrapped in 1948.
  3. Numbers 9575-9579 sold to the NdeM in 1944-1945 and became NdeM numbers 4102-4106.
  4. Numbers 9580-9589 USRA allocated "Mikado-Heavy" locomotives. Number 9588 scrapped in 1948. All the others scrapped between 1950 and 1953.
  5. Numbers 9590-9594 USRA allocated "Mikado-Heavy" locomotives. Number 9590 scrapped in 1948. Number 9592 scrapped in 1951. Numbers 9593 and 9594 scrapped in 1952. Number 9591 scrapped in 1953.

Toledo & Ohio Central

ClassQty.Road NumbersYear BuiltBuilderNote
H-6a159732-97461918ALCO1
Notes:
  1. USRA allocated "Mikado-Light" locomotives. Numbers 9732-9746 renumbered 1732-1746 in 1951. Number 9737 scrapped in 1949. Number 9735, 9738, 9744, 9745 and 9746 scrapped in 1951. Numbers 9732, 9734, 9736, 9740 and 9741 scrapped in 1954. Numbers 9733 and 9739 scrapped in 1955. Numbers 9742 and 9743 scrapped in 1956.

Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class H-10 (Locobase 9696)

Data from "Michigan Central's Mikado (2-8-2) Locomotive No. 8,000", Railway and Locomotive Engineering, Vol XXXV, No 9 (September 1922), pp. 227-230 and John F Welch, "The Wonder Locomotive", Locomotive Engineers Journal, Volume 56, No 10 (October 1922), pp. 767-771; and "Locomotive Power Output per Unit of Weight", Railway Engineer, Volume , No 11 (November 1922), p. 420-422. (Thanks to Chris Hohl for his 26 May 2017 and attached builder's card, which corrected a low tender coal capacity and added an 11,000 lb booster capability.) Works number was 6242 in June 1922.

From the start, Lima's pioneer superpower locomotive gave notice that it represented a significant improvement in power and economy compared to any freight locomotive that had preceded it. At every point where steam could be made hotter or drier or both, the locomotive was designed to encourage that result. A feedwater heater mounted over the smokebox preheated the water to 225 deg F. A new brick arch in the firebox contained a double row of tubes and a more reflective brick. The main throttle was moved to the front end and after the superheater in terms of steam passage. There were NO small tubes; all of the tubes in the boiler measure the same dimension-3 1/4" (82.5 mm). Piston valves measured 14" (356 mm) in diameter.

Tests also demonstrated a much reduced dynamic augment, in many cases as much as 50% less at 30, 40, and 50 mph.

The 8000 was tested thoroughly, according to the article:

"The engine has been given much wider range of service than is usually accorded. It was previously designed to haul a heavy train in fast freight service and especially adapted therefor, but it has proven its effectiveness in very heavy, relatively slow drag freight service to the extent of hauling 10,039 tons in 147 cars, a train 1 1/4 miles long, from Toledo, O., to Detroit, Mich., a distance of 47.6 miles, on June 30, 1922, in 3 hours, 31 minutes running time.

"The engine has been in operation since about the first of June between Detroit and Toledo, and between Toledo and Jackson, Mich. The Michigan Central Railway is preparing to make exhaustive test of the engine, data from which will be available. So far the engine has exceeded the expectation of the builders both in developing high drawbar

pull and in economy of operation ....

"No trouble has been experienced in maintaining full boiler pressure when operating

at maximum capacity, while the evaporation per pound of fuel is phenomenal, as shown by the fact that for three of the full tonnage runs made between Detroit and Toledo, the total water divided by total fuel averaged 9.7 Ibs."

This last number is significantly higher than most other locomotive designs could report at that time.

See Locobases 7078 and 7079 (H-10a) and 29 (H-10b) for the series versions of the H-10 design.


Class H-10a (Locobase 7078)

Data from P&LE-PMcK&Y 3 1-26 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. See Locobase 9696 for 8000, the original H-10 .

Builder's numbers were 64753-64762 (June 1923) and 65612-65622 (September 1924). This order (S.1431) was part of a larger H-10a program that equipped several of the New York Central system's railroads. Note that the Type E superheater used in these engines meant that there were no flues (or no tubes, depending on how one categorizes the 3 1/4" (82.5 mm) diameter tubes that made up all of the flues in these boilers.)


Class H-10a (Locobase 7079)

Data from P&LE-PMcK&Y 3 1-26 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

This program equipped several of the New York Central system's railroads with a dramatically revised Mikado design that would come into full flower with the H-10b; see Locobase 9696 for 8000, the original H-10 .

Note that the kind of superheater used in these engines meant that there were no flues (or no tubes, depending on how one categorizes the 253 3 1/4" (82.5 mm) diameter tubes that made up all of the flues in these boilers.) Particularly noticeable is the much higher superheat percentage (in this case 28% of the total).

Very few changes were made to these engines over their careers. Lima supplied 75, Schenectady the balance to the Michigan Central with road numbers 123-132, the Big Four (CCC&StL) --see Locobase 9697, Boston & Albany, numbered 183-190, and the New York Central itself. See the separate entry for the P & LE engines (Locobase 7078).


Class H-10a (Locobase 9697)

Data from MC 7 - 1937 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

As part of the overall H-10 adoption by entire New York Central System (see Locobase 7079), the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis ordered its own set of Mikes. These had 8 fewer tubes, but were otherwise essentially identical.


Class H-10b (Locobase 29)

This represented the most numerous class of Mikados on the New York Central, totalling 302 locomotives in H-10 (Locobase 9696), H-10a, H-10b subclasses. (Many thanks to Chris Hohl for his 22 September 2017 email reporting unlikely boiler pressure values for 177 entries. A Locobase macro caused the error .) Lima and Alco shared the 190-engine batch that was delivered in 1923 after Lima's demonstrator, the Michigan Central 8000 which was designed by Lima's William E. Woodard.

In addition to the 50 delivered by Alco-Schenectady (works numbers 65562-65611) directly to the New York Central, the builder sent eleven more (works numbers 65612-65622) to the Pittsburgh & Lake Erie as their 201-211. Lima's contribution included 25 (works numbers 6813-6837) for the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis (Big Four) with road numbers 221-236 and 15 to the Michigan Central (works numbers 6838-6852) with road numbers 237-251.

Tom Gearhart (trg6000@adelphia.net ) responded to an email request in February 2001 with data on heating surfaces, weight on the drivers, and other information. He supplied two examples -- the prototype ( see Locobase 9696 for 8000, the original H-10) and #213 -- from which Locobase chose the later data (corrected by 1930 NYC locomotive guide) . Boiler pressure dropped slightly and the superheater grew in proportion. Note the high superheat percentage combined with a relatively large boiler (in relation to the cylinder volume) for a superheated Mikado.

See Alan Bates "Why the H-10 was a Landmark Locomotive" in the June 1975 Trains magazine.


Class H-5a to h, k, m-n (Locobase 1384)

Data from 1926 NYC locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

462 of these engines were conversions of the G-5 2-8-0s that had entered service only a few years earlier (Locobase 5372). According to Drury (1993), it was a question for the Central of whether to put the money into upgrading virtually all main parts of the 2-8-0, or take the opportunity to enlarge the design to meet increased traffic demands.

Leaving the firebox alone except for increasing the arch tube area, the builders mentioned below took the Consolidation and:

1) enlarged the cylinders, 2) lengthened the boiler tubes and flues by 5 feet, 3) decreased boiler pressure by 20 psi, 4) stretched the engine wheelbase by 8 feet, and 5) increased adhesion by about 5 tons.

The goal seems to have been to raise freight train speeds by giving each cubic foot of cylinder in the engine more steam to work with and encouraging it to move faster by providing a steadier ride.

Baldwin rebuilt the first 5, Lima 10, the Central's own West Albany shops 20, and the lion's share--427--at Alco's Brooks works. Lima and Schenectady delivered 179 new H-5s--50 H-5h (Schenectady 1913), 81 H-5s, t (Lima 1916), 15 H-5r (Schenectady 1916), 20 H-5u (Schenectady & Lima 1923), and 5 H-5v (Lima 1924).

Dr Jonathan Smith of Iowa State (http://orion.math.iastate.edu/jdhsmith/term/slusnyc.htm, visited 10 Dec 2004) illustrates the bewildering combinations possible in so extensive an upgrade by publishing four sets of heating surfaces depending on the combination of number of boiler tubes and type of superheater:

EHS SHS Small tubes

3957sq.ft. 920sq.ft. 252

4010sq.ft. 920sq.ft. 257 (Locobase 15860)

4031sq.ft. 870sq.ft. 259 (This entry)

4094 sq.ft. 870sq.ft. 265 (Locobase 9745)

The Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic's 1050-1054 class of Mikados was made up of the 1232 and 1304 in July 1937, 1323 and 1327 in January 1941, and 1222 in March 1942.

The Atlanta, Birmingham & Coast bought eleven of the locomotives sold by the NYC to locomotive rebuilder/reseller Georgia Car & Locomotive. Given road numbers 225-235, the class had borne NYC road numbers 1555-1556, 1317, 1535, 1642, 1561, 1499, 1203, 1244, 1275, 1234.

LS&MS 6157 and 6014 as well as NYC 633, 1226, 1243, 1204, 1283 went to the Tennessee, Alabama & Georgia as their 304-306. Atlanta & St Andrews Bay bought the 1247 from locomotive rebuilder/reseller Georgia Car & Locomotive and gave it road number 404. After the 1557 was sold to the Alton & Southern as their 17, the locomotive went on to the Tennessee Central and took number 730.


Class H-5l (Locobase 9745)

Data from CCC&StL 3 - 1914 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

It's interesting to see the trouble the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago, and St Louis went to in making over their G-5 Consolidations into these H-5 Mikados. Unusually, they farmed out the project to Lima (20 engines) and Alco's Brooks Works at Dunkirk, NY (all the rest). Compared to the New York Central engines described in Locobase 1384, this set had six more tubes.


Class H-5p, q, t (Locobase 15860)

Data from 1926 NYC locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

Locobase 1384 outlines the main purposes of this large rebuild program in which Consolidations were transformed into Mikados (Locobase 5382). The present entry describes 179 engines that, for some reason, had two fewer boiler tubes: 110 H-5p and 19 H-5q were rebuilds. In 1916, Lima built two batches of H-5t, 20 numbered between 6069-6088 and 50 numbered 3935-3984.

As the NYC began retiring this class in the 1930s, it found buyers for some of the engines in smaller railroads. After locomotive rebuilder/reseller Georgia Car & Locomotive bought the 1342, 1341, and 1350 in 1937, it sold the trio to the Atlanta & St Andrews Bay as their 403, 401, 402, respectively. In the same year, the 1460 and 1470 went to North Carolina's High Point, Thomasville & Denton.


Class H-5r (Locobase 15857)

Data from Edward L May and William D Edson, "Locomotives of the New York Central Lines" (1966), p 114. Works numbers were 55893-55907 in August 1916.

Locobase 1384 discusses this large class of Mikados in some detail. Although 462 of the class were rebuilt Consolidations, the H-5 designation covered some newly built locomotives like this small order for the NYC's transfer line.

The class was renumbered late in their careers in 1949 by the New York Central. All of the new numbers were in the 1310-1343 range.


Class H-6a-cchamber removed (Locobase 5221)

Data from http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/nyc/toe-p55.gif (visited December 2002). See also NYC 1-1944 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

One of the largest studs of USRA light Mikados (Locobase 40) was owned by the New York Central system. The parent lines had 79, while others went to

the Big Four (25 from Baldwin in 1918, road numbers 1700-1724),

Lake Erie & Western (15 from Baldwin in 1918, road 5540-5554), Michigan Central (20 from Alco-Schenectady in 1918, road 7970-7989), and the Toledo & Ohio Central (15 from Alco Schenectady in 1918).

The 14" piston valves had a 6 1/2" of travel. The firebox heating surface included 27 sq ft of arch tubes.

Although the light Mikados had a combustion chamber, the New York Central removed it from most of their locomotives beginning in the early 1920s. Locobase's data reflects the deletion, which resulted in more tube heating surface area and more superheater area. Some were later fitted with feed water heaters. The effect on heating surface area of installing thermic syphons in several locomotives is shown in Locobase 15858.

By 1944, the earlier Baldwins (road numbers 1700-1724) retained their original boilers, but all had had the combustion chambers removed. None had received thermic syphons. 24 of the Schenectady locomotives (1732-1849) were fitted with new boilers.


Class H-6a-thermic syphon (Locobase 15858)

Data from NYC 1-1944 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

Locobase 5221 describes the New York Central Lines' H-6a Mikados, which were built as USRA Light Mikados (Locobase 40), once the railroad had removed the combustion chamber. Like the USRA designs, the cylinders were served by 14" (356 mm) piston valves that had 6 1/2" of travel. The firebox heating surface included 27 sq ft of arch tubes.

This entry shows the 26 H-6a that were later fitted with thermic syphons that added 70.5 sq ft (8.55 sq m) to the firebox heating surface area.


Class H-7a, b (Locobase 5401)

Data from http://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/steam-282-specs.htm (visited 15 February 2003), which notes that the design had 16" piston valves. Works numbers were 52536-52551 in 1912, 52784-52787 in 1913.

Wes Barris, on http://www.steamlocomotive.com/Mikado/ (visited 15 February 2003), says this was "a fairly routine design" that worked in the MidWest New York Central system. According to Drury (1993), the LS&MS bought two batches -- 10 H-7a and 25 H-7b.

4000 and 4009 were sold in 1930 to the Montour Railroad as their 40-41. The other H-7a from the first batch retained their LS&MS numbers throughout their careers, which ended with their scrapping in a block in September 1933.

The second H-7a group (4010-4019) and the H-7bs were renumbered by the Michigan Central in 1917 to 7950-7959 and 7935-7949, respectively. All had their first two digits changed to 20 by the NYC in 1936. H-7a 2051 worked for the New York Central for almost forty years, then went north to Canada to the Cumberland Railway & Coal Company in 1950. The CR&C sold the 2051 to the Sydney & Louisburg in 1955. The S&L gave her number 106 and operated her until 1960.


Class H-7c, d (Locobase 5402)

Data from http://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/steam-282-specs.htm (visited 15 February 2003), which notes that the design had 16" piston valves. Works numbers were 54092-54126 in 1913.

As noted in 5401, Wes Barris, on http://www.steamlocomotive.com/Mikado/(visited 15 February 2003), says this was "a fairly routine design" that worked in the MidWest New York Central system. According to Drury (1993), the Michigan Central bought its 35 in one batch.


Class H-7e (Locobase 5403)

Data from http://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/steam-282-specs.htm (visited 15 February 2003), which notes that the design had 16" piston valves. Works numbers were 62297-62306 in November 1920.

This class was a slight modification of the original H-7 design that traded a few firetubes for a couple more flues. This brought the superheater ratio up to 1 in 5. Alco delivered these 10 to the MC while supplying the Big Four with 49 of the same design; see Locobase 5402.

As explained in Locobase 5404, data from NYC 1 - 1946 Locomotive Diagram book (supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange) gives a range of weights for this class ranging from 328,000 lb to 343,100 lb. Locobase chose the highest weight for this set of 10 in part because it was a separate order and in part to show the effect (albeit modest) on certain ratios.


Class H-7e (Locobase 5404)

Data from http://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/steam-282-specs.htm (visited 15 February 2003), which notes that the design had sizable 16" piston valves. Works numbers were 62247-62271 in October 1920 and 62272-62296 in November.

The H-7e was a slight modification of the original H-7 design that traded a few firetubes for a couple more flues. This brought the superheater ratio up to 1 in 5.

Data from NYC 1 - 1946 Locomotive Diagram book ( supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange) gives a range of weights for this class randing from 328,000 lb to 343,100 lb. Locobase picks a value from the table that falls in the middle. The differences are due in part to the provision of Delta trailing trucks in some engines.

The Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago, and St Louis engines were procured at the same time as the 10 for the Michigan Central; see Locobase 5403.


Class H-8a (Locobase 7065)

Data from P&LE-PMcK&Y 3 1-26 and MNGHLA 12 - 1947 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Works numbers were 55646-55650 in March 1916

These were delivered to the P & LE as a single batch . The firebox heating surface included 32 sq ft of arch tubes.

9500-9501 were sent to the Lake Erie & Eastern and renumbered 9595-9596. They then went to the Monongahela as part of the MR's L-3 class and numbered 189-190. 9502 arrived on the same railroad three years later and took road number 193.

One of these later went to Pemex and was given a Nacional de Mexico class designation of KR-5 and numbered 4115. At that time it trailed a tender holding 16,000 gallons of water and 5,000 gallons of fuel oil that weighed 286,596 lb.


Class H-8a, c (Locobase 7066)

Data from P&LE-PMcK&Y 3 1-26 and MNGHLA 12 - 1947 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Works numbers were 55651-55652 in March 1916, 55653-55655 in April, and 58088-58092 in February 1918.

Part of the same batch as the five that went to the Pittsburgh and Lake Erie (Locobase 7065). The Pittsburgh, McKeesport & Youghiogheny operated in the western coal regions of Pennsylvania.

9550-9551 went to the Monongahela in 1944 as part of class L-3 and numbered 191-192. The H-8c quintet found second careers in 1944-1945 on the Petroleum Mexicanos as 5000-5004.


Class H-8b (Locobase 15862)

Data from P&LE-PMcK&Y 3 1-26 and MNGHLA 12 - 1947 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Works numbers were 56778-56787 and 57058-57067 in 1917.

Essentially identical to the H-8a that went to the PMcK&Y (Locobase 7065), this larger group of Mikados introduced both trailing-truck boosters and automatic stokers to the design.

In 1947-1948, seven of the class went to the Monongahela Railroad as part of class L-3. Numbered 194-200, they were the former 9563, 9571, 9561, 9564, 9568, 9558, and 9559, respectively. Twelve locomotives--9553, 9554, 9572, 9573, 9566, 9562, 9570, 9557, 9555, 9567, 9556, 9565-- found second careers in 1944-1945 on the Petroleum Mexicanos as 5005-5016. 9574 also went to Pemex, but was numbered 4117.


Class H-8d (Locobase 15861)

Data from P&LE-PMcK&Y 3 1-26 and MNGHLA 12 - 1947 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

Most of the H-8 Mkados owned by the P&LE and the Pittsburgh, McKeesport & Youghiogheny had the same boiler and firebox dimensions (see, e.g., Locobase 7065). When the P&LE went back to Schenectady in 1920, however, they took the opportunity to delete fourteen small tubes in favor of two more flues and their superheater elements. The P&LE book doesn't show that the -8d were fitted with either a booster or automatic stoker, as had been delivered in the PMcK&Y in 1917.

The class left the P&LE within twenty years. The last two went to the Cambria & Indiana in 1939 as their 20-21. The first three left a year later to join what would be a very large stud of H-8s on the Monongahela as their 186-188.


Class H-9a , c (Locobase 7076)

Data from P&LE-PMcK&Y 3 1-26 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Brooks works numbers for H-9a were 60345-60354 in October 1918. Schenectady works numbers for the H-9c were 61029-61033 in March 1919 in the same batch as the P&LE H-9b.

These were United States Railroad Administration (USRA) Heavy Mikados (Locobase 41) that were delivered as specified. The New York Central apparently didn't care for combustion chambers in their USRA Mikados, so they deleted them in favor of extending the tube and flue lengths by 21" (533 mm). The principal effect was to increase both evaporative heating surface area and superheating surface areas.


Class H-9b, d (Locobase 7077)

Data from P&LE-PMcK&Y 3 1-26 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Alco-Schenectady's works numbers for the five H-9b were 61024-61028 in March 1919. Baldwin works numbers for the H-9d were 51433-51436, 51473-51475, 51507-51508 in March and April 1919.

These were United States Railroad Administration (USRA) Heavy Mikados (Locobase 41) that were delivered as specified and identical to the PMcK&Y Mikes shown in Locobase 7076.

As noted in 7076, the New York Central apparently didn't care for combustion chambers in their USRA Mikados, so they deleted them in favor of extending the tube and flue lengths by 21" (533 mm). The principal effect was to increase both evaporative heating surface area and superheating surface areas.


Class H-Xa (Locobase 9403)

Data from NYC 1 - 1930 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. See also E E R Tratman, "Tank Locomotives", Official Proceedings of the Western Railway Club (Chicago: W F Hall Printing Company, 1905), pp. 368. Works numbers were 26253-26254 in 1902.

A rare standard-gauge tank engine design that clearly was intended for switching duties, but used six axles instead of the usual three or four., or at least so Locobase supposed. But comments by the K&M's master mechanic W A Brown suggest somewhat wider ranging duties at first. Brown commented that the "Calumet" type had operated for two years on coal branches, where they met grades as steep as 4 to 4 1/2% and 10-12 degree curves.

"They have given most excellent satisfaction in this service, " said Brown in his written comments, which he outlined in detail. "Their work consists of taking trains of empties to the mine branches, placing them at the tipples and bringing loads out, having a run on the main line with these loaded trains of about twenty miles to terminals, where the cars are taking to the distributing yards and there made up into trains for destination."

And, despite the coal branches' uneven tank,, the railroad had "experienced no trouble with them in regard to derailments due to surging of water in tank, making them unevenly balanced."

According to Richard Leonard's website (http://www.railarchive.net/nyccollection/km9501.htm, accessed 23 April 2008), the class served West Virginia classification yards into the late 1930s.

Two were delivered in 1902 - they are shown here. The third in this original order and two more from 1912 were slightly bigger and appear in Locobase 9404.


Class H-Xb (Locobase 9404)

Data from NYC 1 - 1930 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Works numbers were 43701 in 1907 and 51514-51525 in 1912.

These were essentially repeats of the H-Xa pair that was produced in 1902 (Locobase 9403). For some reason, the builder added two more tubes to the boiler and the side tanks held 500 US gallons (1,893 litres) more water. Otherwise, the five locomotives in the two classes were essentially identical and were rated at the same power.

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassH-10H-10aH-10aH-10aH-10b
Locobase ID9696 7078 7079 9697 29
RailroadMichigan Central (NYC)Pittsburgh & Lake Erie (NYC)New York Central (NYC)Big Four (NYC)New York Central (NYC)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-22-8-22-8-22-8-22-8-2
Number in Class12119050190
Road Numbers8000/2090/2100191-2001-122/2101-2222133-182/2233-2282320-360/2360-2399, 2080-2089
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built12119050190
BuilderLimaAlco-SchenectadyseveralAlco-Schenectadyseveral
Year19221923192319221924
Valve GearBakerBakerBakerBakerWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)16.50 / 5.0316.50 / 5.0316.50 / 5.0316.50 / 5.0316.50 / 5.03
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)37 / 11.2837 / 11.2837 / 11.2837 / 11.2837 / 11.28
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.45 0.45 0.45 0.45 0.45
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)71.54 / 21.8171.54 / 21.8171.54 / 21.8178.25 / 23.85
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)245,500 / 111,357248,000 / 112,491252,100 / 114,351252,500 / 114,532246,000 / 111,584
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)334,000 / 151,500335,000 / 151,954341,600 / 154,947342,500 / 155,356337,000 / 152,861
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)199,700 / 90,583200,300 / 90,855200,300 / 90,855276,000 / 125,192276,000 / 125,192
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)533,700 / 242,083535,300 / 242,809541,900 / 245,802618,500 / 280,548613,000 / 278,053
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)10,000 / 37.8816,000 / 60.6110,000 / 37.8815,000 / 56.8218,000 / 68.18
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)16 / 14.5010 / 9.1010 / 9.1018 / 16.4015 / 13.60
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)102 / 51103 / 51.50105 / 52.50105 / 52.50103 / 51.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)63 / 160063 / 160063 / 160063 / 160063 / 1600
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)200 / 13.80210 / 14.50210 / 14.50200 / 13.80200 / 13.80
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)28" x 30" / 711x76228" x 30" / 711x76228" x 30" / 711x76228" x 30" / 711x76228" x 30" / 711x762
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)63,467 / 28788.1866,640 / 30227.4366,640 / 30227.4363,467 / 28788.1863,467 / 28788.18
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.87 3.72 3.78 3.98 3.88
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)291 / 27.03291 / 27.04257 / 23.88257 / 23.88261 / 24.25
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)66.40 / 6.1766.40 / 6.1766.40 / 6.1766.40 / 6.1766.80 / 6.21
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)4578 / 425.314578 / 425.464544 / 422.304415 / 410.324387 / 407.71
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)1780 / 165.371780 / 165.431780 / 165.431780 / 165.432020 / 187.73
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)6358 / 590.686358 / 590.896324 / 587.736195 / 575.756407 / 595.44
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume214.12214.12212.53206.50205.19
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation13,28013,94413,94413,28013,360
Same as above plus superheater percentage16,99817,84817,84817,13117,635
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area74,49678,22169,08266,30668,904
Power L121,66122,74422,53321,33423,447
Power MT778.07808.74788.21745.08840.52

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassH-5a to h, k, m-nH-5lH-5p, q, tH-5rH-6a-cchamber removed
Locobase ID1384 9745 15,860 15,857 5221
RailroadNew York Central (NYC)Big Four (NYC)New York Central (NYC)Indiana Harbor Belt (NYC)New York Central (NYC)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-22-8-22-8-22-8-22-8-2
Number in Class42310412915143
Road Numbers1200-16496000-6036, 6701, 6703,3722, 3852250-2641700-24, 1732-46, 1770-89, 1800-09, 17-29, 34-94
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built42315143
BuilderseveralseveralseveralAlco-SchenectadyNYC
Year19121913191519161918
Valve GearWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)16.50 / 5.0316.50 / 5.0316.50 / 5.0316.50 / 5.0316.75 / 5.11
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)35.25 / 10.7434.67 / 10.5735.25 / 10.7435.25 / 10.7436.09 / 11
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.47 0.48 0.47 0.47 0.46
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)67 / 20.4264.75 / 19.7467.37 / 20.5367.58 / 20.6071.37 / 21.75
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)215,500 / 97,749213,300 / 96,751216,100 / 98,021215,900 / 97,931220,000 / 99,790
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)280,000 / 127,006281,100 / 127,505289,300 / 131,224289,700 / 131,406292,000 / 132,449
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)150,500 / 68,266150,500 / 68,266159,000 / 72,121185,400 / 84,096
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)431,600 / 195,771439,800 / 199,490448,700 / 203,527477,400 / 216,545
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)7500 / 28.417500 / 28.417500 / 28.418000 / 30.3010,000 / 37.88
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)12 / 10.9012 / 10.9012 / 10.9012 / 10.9016 / 14.50
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)90 / 4589 / 44.5090 / 4590 / 4592 / 46
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)63 / 160063 / 160063 / 160063 / 160063 / 1600
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)190 / 13.10180 / 12.40190 / 13.10200 / 13.80200 / 13.80
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)25" x 32" / 635x81325" x 32" / 635x81325" x 32" / 635x81325" x 32" / 635x81326" x 30" / 660x762
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)51,270 / 23255.7148,571 / 22031.4651,270 / 23255.7153,968 / 24479.5054,724 / 24822.42
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.20 4.39 4.21 4.00 4.02
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)230 / 21.37230 / 21.38230 / 21.37230.90 / 21.45243.50 / 22.62
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)56.50 / 5.2556.50 / 5.2556.50 / 5.2556.50 / 5.2566.70 / 6.20
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)4031 / 374.494094 / 380.484010 / 372.544096 / 380.534109 / 381.74
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)870 / 80.82870 / 80.86870 / 80.82880 / 81.75983 / 91.32
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)4901 / 455.314964 / 461.344880 / 453.364976 / 462.285092 / 473.06
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume221.72225.19220.57225.30222.89
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation10,73510,17010,73511,30013,340
Same as above plus superheater percentage12,66712,00112,66713,33415,875
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area51,56648,85251,56654,49257,953
Power L114,27713,59114,25415,21316,146
Power MT584.23561.89581.67621.38647.20

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassH-6a-thermic syphonH-7a, bH-7c, dH-7eH-7e
Locobase ID15,858 5401 5402 5403 5404
RailroadNew York Central (NYC)Lake Shore & Michigan Southern (NYC)Michigan Central (NYC)Michigan Central (NYC)Big Four (NYC)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-22-8-22-8-22-8-22-8-2
Number in Class2635351049
Road Numbers1770-1789, 1817, 22, 27, 45, 66, 734000-4034/795-7959/2035-20597900-7934/2000-20347960-7969/2060-20696150-6199
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built2635351049
BuilderNYCAlcoAlco-BrooksAlco-BrooksAlco-Schenectady
Year19181912191319201920
Valve GearWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)16.75 / 5.1116.50 / 5.0316.50 / 5.0316.50 / 5.0316.50 / 5.03
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)36.09 / 1136.08 / 1136.08 / 1136.08 / 1136.08 / 11
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.46 0.46 0.46 0.46 0.46
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)71.37 / 21.7571.92 / 21.9271.92 / 21.9271.25 / 21.7271.25 / 21.72
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)220,000 / 99,790245,000 / 111,130245,000 / 111,130250,900 / 113,806244,200 / 110,767
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)292,000 / 132,449322,000 / 146,057322,000 / 146,057343,100 / 155,628335,900 / 152,362
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)185,400 / 84,096159,700 / 72,439159,700 / 72,439276,000 / 125,192186,700 / 84,686
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)477,400 / 216,545481,700 / 218,496481,700 / 218,496619,100 / 280,820522,600 / 237,048
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)10,000 / 37.8810,000 / 37.8810,000 / 37.8810,000 / 37.8810,000 / 37.88
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)16 / 14.5014 / 12.7014 / 12.7016 / 14.5016 / 14.50
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)92 / 46102 / 51102 / 51105 / 52.50102 / 51
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)63 / 160063 / 160063 / 160063 / 160063 / 1600
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)200 / 13.80190 / 13.10190 / 13.10200 / 13.80200 / 13.80
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)26" x 30" / 660x76227" x 30" / 686x76227" x 30" / 686x76227" x 30" / 686x76227" x 30" / 686x762
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)54,724 / 24822.4256,064 / 25430.2356,064 / 25430.2359,014 / 26768.3359,014 / 26768.33
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.02 4.37 4.37 4.25 4.14
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)300.80 / 27.95246 / 22.86246 / 22.86250 / 23.23250 / 23.23
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)66.70 / 6.2059.50 / 5.5359.50 / 5.5359.60 / 5.5459.60 / 5.54
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)4166 / 387.034737 / 440.244737 / 440.244650 / 432.164650 / 432.16
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)983 / 91.321084 / 100.741084 / 100.741163 / 108.091163 / 108.09
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)5149 / 478.355821 / 540.985821 / 540.985813 / 540.255813 / 540.25
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume225.98238.27238.27233.90233.90
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation13,34011,30511,30511,92011,920
Same as above plus superheater percentage15,87513,45313,45314,30414,304
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area71,59055,62155,62160,00060,000
Power L116,53715,77815,77817,28917,289
Power MT662.87567.91567.91607.66624.34

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassH-8aH-8a, cH-8bH-8dH-9a , c
Locobase ID7065 7066 15,862 15,861 7076
RailroadPittsburgh & Lake Erie (NYC)Pittsburgh, McKeesport & Youghiogeny (NYC)Pittsburgh, McKeesport & Youghiogeny (NYC)Pittsburgh & Lake Erie (NYC)Pittsburgh, McKeesport & Youghiogeny (NYC)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-22-8-22-8-22-8-22-8-2
Number in Class51020515
Road Numbers9500-95049550-9554, 9575-95799555-95749520-95249580-9594
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built51020515
BuilderAlco-SchenectadyAlco-SchenectadyAlco-SchenectadyAlco-SchenectadyAlco
Year19161916191719201918
Valve GearWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)16.50 / 5.0316.50 / 5.0316.50 / 5.0316.50 / 5.0316.75 / 5.11
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)36.08 / 1136.08 / 1136.08 / 1136.08 / 1136.92 / 11.25
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.46 0.46 0.46 0.46 0.45
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)71.79 / 21.8871.79 / 21.8871.79 / 21.8871.79 / 21.8879.17 / 24.13
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)62,310 / 28,26362,310 / 28,26362,310 / 28,26362,310 / 28,263
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)238,900 / 108,363238,900 / 108,363248,500 / 112,718239,000 / 108,409250,000 / 113,398
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)320,500 / 145,377320,500 / 145,377330,000 / 149,686322,700 / 146,374331,000 / 150,139
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)200,000 / 90,719200,000 / 90,719283,900 / 128,775182,000 / 82,554283,900 / 128,775
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)520,500 / 236,096520,500 / 236,096613,900 / 278,461504,700 / 228,928614,900 / 278,914
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)12,500 / 47.3512,500 / 47.3516,000 / 60.6112,500 / 47.3516,000 / 60.61
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)19 / 17.3019 / 17.3019 / 17.3019 / 17.3018 / 16.40
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)100 / 50100 / 50104 / 52100 / 50104 / 52
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)57 / 144857 / 144857 / 144857 / 144863 / 1600
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)190 / 13.10190 / 13.10190 / 13.10190 / 13.10190 / 13.10
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)26.5" x 30" / 673x76226.5" x 30" / 673x76226.5" x 30" / 673x76226.5" x 30" / 673x76227" x 32" / 686x813
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)59,691 / 27075.4159,691 / 27075.4159,691 / 27075.4159,691 / 27075.4159,801 / 27125.31
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.00 4.00 4.16 4.00 4.18
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)278 / 25.84278 / 25.84278 / 25.83250 / 23.23307 / 28.53
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)60 / 5.5860 / 5.5860 / 5.5760 / 5.5770.80 / 6.58
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)4740 / 440.524740 / 440.524740 / 440.364650 / 4324285 / 398.23
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)1084 / 100.741084 / 100.741084 / 100.711163 / 108.051164 / 92.29
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)5824 / 541.265824 / 541.265824 / 541.075813 / 540.055449 / 490.52
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume247.51247.51247.51242.81202.07
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation11,40011,40011,40011,40013,452
Same as above plus superheater percentage13,56613,56613,56613,68016,277
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area62,85662,85662,85657,00070,579
Power L114,97314,97314,97315,42615,331
Power MT552.70552.70531.34569.18540.78

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassH-9b, dH-XaH-Xb
Locobase ID7077 9403 9404
RailroadPittsburgh & Lake Erie (NYC)Kanawha & Michigan (NYC)Kanawha & Michigan (NYC)
CountryUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-22-8-2T2-8-2T
Number in Class523
Road Numbers9505-9509555-556/9500-9501557-559/9502-9504
GaugeStdStdStd
Number Built523
BuilderseveralAlco-BrooksAlco-Brooks
Year191919021907
Valve GearWalschaertStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)16.75 / 5.1115 / 4.5715 / 4.57
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)36.92 / 11.2534 / 10.3634 / 10.36
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.45 0.44 0.44
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)79.17 / 24.1334 / 10.3634 / 10.36
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)250,000 / 113,398154,000 / 69,853154,000 / 69,853
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)331,000 / 150,139240,800 / 109,225245,000 / 111,130
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)283,900 / 128,775
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)614,900 / 278,914240,800245,000
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)16,000 / 60.612500 / 9.473000 / 11.36
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)18 / 16.405 / 4.505 / 4.50
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)104 / 5264 / 3264 / 32
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)63 / 160049 / 124549 / 1245
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)190 / 13.10200 / 13.80200 / 13.80
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)27" x 32" / 686x81319" x 26" / 483x66019" x 26" / 483x660
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)59,801 / 27125.3132,564 / 14770.8032,564 / 14770.80
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.18 4.73 4.73
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)307 / 28.53165 / 15.33165 / 15.33
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)70.80 / 6.5846.20 / 4.2946.20 / 4.29
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)4285 / 398.232642 / 245.542493 / 231.69
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)1164 / 92.29
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)5449 / 490.522642 / 245.542493 / 231.69
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume202.07309.65292.19
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation13,45292409240
Same as above plus superheater percentage16,27792409240
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area70,57933,00033,000
Power L115,33166376352
Power MT540.78380.05363.73

Photos

Reference