Rutland 2-8-2 "Mikado" Locomotives in the USA

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The Rutland Railroad was a small railroad operating in the state of Vermont with part of the line entering the state of New York. The earliest ancestor of the Rutland, the Rutland & Burlington Railroad, was chartered in 1843 by the state of Vermont to build between Rutland, VT and Burlington VT. The name was shortened to Rutland Railroad in 1867.

The New York Central Railroad obtained a controlling interest in the Rutland in 1904 and in 1911 sold half of its shares to the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad.

At its peak the Rutland had about 400 miles of track running from Chatham, NY north to Alburgh, VT and then west to Ogdensburg, NY along the St. Lawrence River. The Rutland entered receivership in1938. Cost cutting, including wage reduction, brought things around. Reorganized in1950 the name was changed from Rutland Railroad to Rutland Railway.

The Rutland Railroad bought six "Mikado" type locomotives in 1918, from the American Locomotive Company. These locomotives were built to the Mikado-Light USRA Specifications and were designated as Class H-6-a and assigned road numbers 32 through 37. They had 63" diameter drivers, 26" x 30" cylinders, a 200 psi boiler pressure, they exerted 54,725 pounds of tractive effort and each weighed 290,000 pounds. The firebox was 280 square feet, the evaporative heating surface was 3,777 square feet and with the superheater the combined heating surface was 4,659 square feet.

There are no surviving Rutland 2-8-2 Mikado type locomotives.


Roster by Richard Duley

ClassQty.Road NumbersYear BuiltBuilderNotes
H-6-a632-371918ALCO1
Notes:
  1. Number 34 scrapped in 1952. All the others scrapped in 1951.

Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class H-6 (Locobase 14575)

Data from tables in 1930 Locomotive Cyclopedia and from American Locomotive Company, Standardized Locomotives, US Railroad Administration (Alco Pamphlet 10049, 1918), pp. 16-17, reprinted by (Ocean, NJ: Specialty Press , 1973). See also . Works numbers were 59609-59614 in 1918.

The six Mikados supplied by the United States Railroad Administration were part of the big run of Light 2-8-2s (Locobase 40) produced to a common design during the US government's ownership of railroad operations at the end of World War One. All of the dimensions were identical except for a slight difference in heating surface area.

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassH-6
Locobase ID14,575
RailroadRutland (Rutland)
CountryUSA
Whyte2-8-2
Number in Class6
Road Numbers32-37
GaugeStd
Number Built6
BuilderAlco-Schenectady
Year1918
Valve GearWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)16.75 / 5.11
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)36.08 / 11
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.46
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)71.37 / 21.75
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)220,000 / 99,790
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)292,000 / 132,449
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)188,300 / 85,412
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)480,300 / 217,861
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)10,000 / 37.88
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)16 / 14.50
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)92
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)63 / 1600
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)200 / 13.80
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)26" x 30" / 660x762
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)54,724 / 24822.42
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.02
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)280 / 26.01
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)66.70 / 6.20
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)3777 / 350.89
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)882 / 81.94
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)4659 / 432.83
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume204.88
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation13,340
Same as above plus superheater percentage15,875
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area66,640
Power L114,940
Power MT598.85

Photos

Reference