Alabama Great Southern / Cincinnati New Orleans & Texas Pacific / Cincinnati, New Orleans & Texas Pacific / New Orleans & North Eastern / Southern / Virginia & Southwestern 2-8-2 "Mikado" Locomotives in the USA

Southern

The Southern Railway was the product of nearly 150 predecessor lines that were combined, reorganized and recombined beginning in the 1830s, formally becoming the Southern Railway in 1894.

By the end of steam the Southern Railway had grown to over 8,000 miles of line. It controlled several other railroads which included among many others: the Cincinnati New Orleans & Texas Pacific which ran from Cincinnati, OH to Chattanooga, TN, the Alabama Great Southern running from Chattanooga, TN to Meridian, MS, the New Orleans & Northeastern - from Meridian, MS to New Orleans, LA, and the Georgia Southern & Florida - Macon to Palatka, FL and Jacksonville, FL.

The Southern Railway took delivery of its first "Mikados" in 1911 when the Baldwin Locomotive Works delivered forty of them. These first 2-8-2s where designated as Class MS and were assigned road numbers 4501 through 4533 and 4624 through 4630. They had 63" drivers, 27" x 30" cylinders, a 175 psi boiler pressure and they exerted 51,625 pounds of tractive effort and each weighed 284,700 pounds. The fire box was 212 square feet, the evaporative heating surface was 3,231 and with the superheater the combined heating surface was 4,192 square feet.

In 1915, the Spenser shops built tenders, which consisted of the body of a tender mounted on the frame, cylinders and running gear from older steam locomotives. These so-called tractors were installed behind some of the Class MS 2-8-2s for use on the heavy grades of the Asheville Division. Road numbers 4535 through 4539 received a 2-8-0 tractor and a 2-6-0 tractor was installed behind road number 4561. The tractors were rated at 8,375 pounds of tractive effort and the group of seven locomotives was reclassified as Class MS-2.

The USRA assigned twenty-five ALCO-built USRA "Mikado-Light" locomotives to the Southern. They were designated as Class MS-1 and were assigned Southern road numbers 4750 through 4764 and CNO&TP road numbers 6285 through 6294. These locomotives had 63" drivers, 26" x 30" cylinders, a 200 psi boiler pressure and they exerted 57,724 pounds of tractive effort and each weighed 290,800 pounds. The firebox was 280 square feet, the evaporative surface was 3,783 square feet and with the superheater the combined heating surface was 4,665 square feet.

In order to upgrade motive power on one of its subsidiary, the New Orleans & Northeastern Railroad, the Southern designed a "Mikado" with a total weight of only 209,500 pounds to handle the weight restrictions of some of the bridges on the NO&N. These Baldwin-built locomotives delivered in 1916 were designated as Class MS-3 and assigned road numbers 6940 through 6944. They had 57" drivers, 22" x 28" cylinders, a 200 psi boiler pressure and they exerted 40,000 pounds of tractive effort. The firebox was 200 square feet, the evaporative surface was 2,573 square feet and with the superheater the combined heating surface was 3,119 square feet.

In 1923, the Southern began to receive what would become its main line freight locomotives. Between 1923 and 1928, 166 "Mikados" based on the USRA "Mikado-Heavy" design were bought from ALCO and the Baldwin Locomotive Works for the Southern Railway and some of its subsidiaries. These locomotives were designated as Class MS-4 and were given road numbers 4800 through 4914. They had 63" drivers, 27" x 32" cylinders, a 200 psi boiler pressure and they exerted 62,950 pounds of tractive effort and each weighed 329,300. The firebox was 305 square feet, the evaporative surface was 4,285 square feet and with the superheater the combined heating surface was 5,278 square feet. The CNO&TP also took delivery of forty-three of the Class MS-4 2-8-2s. Eighteen (road numbers 6320 through 6337) arrived from ALCO in 1926 and twenty-five (6350 through 6374) came from Baldwin in 1928. The AGS received eight ALCO-built Class MS-4 "Mikados" in 1926 and assigned them road numbers 6622 through 6629.

With a surplus of 2-10-2s, the Southern decided to rebuild some of them into 2-8-2s. In 1929, it converted one of them into new road number 4998 and it was out-shopped with 63" diameter drivers and was used for passenger service and fast freight. This locomotive, designated as Class MS-5, had 27" x 32" cylinders, a 210 psi boiler pressure and it exerted 66,000 pounds of tractive effort and each weighed 329,500 pounds. Between 1929 and 1931 it rebuilt four of the "Santa Fe" type locomotives into "Mikados" with 57" diameter drivers. They were designated as Class MS-6 and assigned road numbers 4995 through 4997 and 4999. These locomotives had 27" x 32" cylinders, a 200 psi boiler pressure and they exerted 69,575 pounds of tractive effort and each weighed 318,300 pounds. The firebox was 373 square feet, the evaporative surface was 3,721 square feet and with the superheater the combined heating surface was 4,557 square feet.

There were seven other "Mikados" and they were purchased second-hand from the Erie Railroad in 1942 to help with wartime traffic. This was a mixed group of ALCO, Baldwin and Lima built locomotives that were assigned AGS road numbers 6630 through 6636 and were designated as Class MS-7

There is one surviving Southern Railway 2-8-2 "Mikado" type locomotives. It is number 4501 and is on display at the East Station, TVRM in Chattanooga, TN.

Alabama Great Southern

The Southern Railway was the product of nearly 150 predecessor lines that were combined, reorganized and recombined beginning in the 1830s, formally becoming the Southern Railway in 1894.

By the end of steam the Southern Railway had grown to over 8,000 miles of line. It controlled several other railroads which included among many others: the Cincinnati New Orleans & Texas Pacific which ran from Cincinnati, OH to Chattanooga, TN, the Alabama Great Southern running from Chattanooga, TN to Meridian, MS, the New Orleans & Northeastern - from Meridian, MS to New Orleans, LA, and the Georgia Southern & Florida - Macon to Palatka, FL and Jacksonville, FL.

The Alabama Great Southern Railroad operated in Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Tennessee. It ran southwest from Chattanooga where it connects with the Cincinnati, New Orleans and Texas Pacific Railway to New Orleans through Birmingham and Meridian.

The first "Mikado" type locomotives on the Alabama Great Southern arrived in 1913 with the delivery of six of them built by the American Locomotive Company. They were designated as Class MS assigned road numbers 6600 through 6605. These locomotives had 63" diameter drivers, 27" x 30" cylinders, a 175 psi boiler pressure, they exerted 51,637 pounds of tractive effort and each weighed 284,700 pounds. The fire box was 212 square feet, the evaporative heating surface was 3,231 square feet and with the superheater the combined heating surface was 4,192 square feet.

In 1917, six more "Mikados" arrived which were built by the Lima Locomotive Works. They were close copies of the ones delivered in 1913 and were designated as Class MS and given road numbers 6606 through 6611.

The USRA assigned twenty-five ALCO-built USRA "Mikado-Light" locomotives to AGS' parent the Southern Railway. They were designated as Class MS-1 and fifteen were assigned Southern road numbers 4750 through 4764 and ten were sent to one of the Southern's subsidiaries the CNO&TP with road numbers 6285 through 6294 assigned. These locomotives had 63" drivers, 26" x 30" cylinders, a 200 psi boiler pressure and they exerted 57,724 pounds of tractive effort and each weighed 290,800 pounds. The firebox was 280 square feet, the evaporative heating surface was 3,783 square feet and with the superheater the combined heating surface was 4,665 square feet.

During 1922 and 1923, forty-five more 2-8-2s, identical to the USRA assigned "Mikados", were ordered by the Southern and delivered from ALCO. They were designated as Class MS-1 and assigned Southern road numbers 4765 through 4774, CNO&TP road numbers 6295 through 6319 and AGS numbers 6612 through 6621.

In 1923, the Southern began to receive what would become its main line freight locomotives. Between 1923 and 1928, 166 "Mikados" based on the USRA "Mikado-Heavy" design were bought from ALCO and the Baldwin Locomotive Works for the Southern Railway and some of its subsidiaries. The AGS received eight of them in 1926 which were designated as Class MS-4 and were given road numbers 6622 through 6629. These locomotives were built by ALCO and had 63" drivers, 27" x 32" cylinders, a 200 psi boiler pressure, exerted 62,950 pounds of tractive effort and each weighed 329,300. The firebox was 305 square feet, the evaporative heating surface was 4,285 square feet and with the superheater the combined heating surface was 5,278 square feet.

There were seven other "Mikado" type locomotives on the AGS roster. They were purchased second-hand from the Erie Railroad in 1942 to help with wartime traffic. This was a mixed group of ALCO, Baldwin and Lima built locomotives that were assigned AGS road numbers 6630 through 6636 and were designated as Class MS-7

There are no surviving Alabama Great Southern 2-8-2 "Mikado" type locomotives.


Roster by Richard Duley

Southern

ClassQty.Road NumbersRoadYear BuiltBuilderNotes
MS 334501-4533Southern Railway1911Baldwin1
MS 204534-4553Southern Railway1912Baldwin1,6
MS 254554-4578Southern Railway1913Baldwin1,6
MS 254579-4603Southern Railway1914Baldwin1
MS 204604-4623Southern Railway1914ALCO1
MS 74624-4630Southern Railway1911Baldwin1
MS 34631-4633Southern Railway1913Baldwin1
MS 24634-4635Southern Railway1914ALCO1
MS-1 154750-4764Southern Railway1918ALCO2,3
MS-1 104765-4774Southern Railway1923ALCO3
MS-4 40 4800-4839Southern Railway1923ALCO4
MS-4 254840-4864Southern Railway1924ALCO4
MS-4 204865-4884Southern Railway1926ALCO4
MS-4 304885-4914Southern Railway1928ALCO4
MS-5 14998Southern Railway1929Sou Rwy5
MS-6 34995-4997Southern Railway1929-1930Sou Rwy5
MS-6 14999Southern Railway1931Sou Rwy5
Notes:
  1. Numbers 4501-4635 on the roster until 1939 and all except number 4501 were gone by 1953.
  2. USRA allocated "Mikado-Light" locomotives.
  3. Numbers 4750-4774 were scrapped between 1951 and 1953.
  4. Numbers 4800-4914 on the roster until 1952 and all were gone by 1954.
  5. Numbers 4995-4999 were built from Southern Railway 2-10-2s and scrapped in1952.
  6. Numbers 4535-4539, number 4561 and number 4576 were reclassified as Class MS-2 after they were equipped with tractor tenders

Alabama Great Southern

ClassQty.Road NumbersFrom Other RRYear AcquiredYear BuiltBuilderNotes
MS 66600-66051913ALCO1
MS 66606-66111917Lima1
MS-1 106612-66211922ALCO1
MS-4 86622-66291926ALCO1
MS-7 76630-6636Erie Railroad19421911-1913Various2
Notes:
  1. All of the Alabama Great Southern 2-8-2s were on the roster until 1949 and were scrapped between 1950 and 1954.
  2. Second hand locomotive bought from the Erie Railroad in 1942 and scrapped between 1949 and 1952.

Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class 101/K/Ms (Locobase 16039)

Data from Excel spreadsheet supplied by Chris Hohl in his 31 March 2015 and DeGolyer, Volume 38, pp. 288+ and Volume 48, pp. 183+. Baldwin's works numbers were 37244-37248, 37259, 37384 in November 1911, 40662-40663 in September 1913, 40722 in October.

This batch of ten Mikados was delivered to the V&SW at the same time identical engines were produced for the Mobile & Ohio (Locobase 13796). They followed the Southern's K-class Mikado design. The last three, delivered almost two years after the first seven, put 3,400 more pounds (1,542 kg) on the drivers. All of the Ks were delivered with fireboxes able to accept arch tubes, but not fitted with them. They all had 14" (356 mm) piston valves.

At the end of 1916, the V&SW was incorporated into the Southern and the 101s were renumbered. By the end of the 'teens, all would be equipped with 32 sq ft (2.95 sq m) of arch tubes and have their boiler pressures set to 180 psi (12.4 bar).


Class 301/K/Ms (Locobase 16041)

Data from DeGolyer, Volume 48, p. 191+. Baldwin's works numbers were 40746-40749 in October 1913 and 40822 in November. Alco's Richmond works number was 54788 in 1914.

Baldwin was building large batches of K-class Mikados (Locobase 44), its subsidiary roads were buying smaller amounts. Part of the Southern's Queen & Crescent Route, the railroad's infamous "Rathole Division" in Kentucky and Tennessee demanded as much tractive power as its limited tunnel clearances would permit. These engines were delivered without arch tubes, although the specs state that the firebox's arch could accept them later.

Boiler pressure would soon be set to 200 psi

All of the 900s were renumbered by the Southern in 1917.


Class 306/K/Ms (Locobase 11077)

Data from SRY 5 - 1943 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Works numbers were 5389-5394 in July 1917.

Although placed in class K, this batch of Mikes had larger boilers and fireboxes than the widely used Ks bought earlier by the Southern system (for which see Locobase 44). Grate area increased because Lima added 12" to the grate's width. The biggest change was a more than 20% increase in superheater area through the addition of ten more flues.

The diagram, dated July 12, 1919, gives only the evaporative heating surface. The superheat area is an estimate based on a similar flue count and length on two other Mikados from the same period.


Class 900/K/Ms (Locobase 16040)

Data from CNO&TP Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. See also DeGolyer, Volume 38, p. 287+ and Vol 43, pp. 31+.

Baldwin's works numbers were 37136-37145 in October 1911 (road 900-903, 907, 921-922), 37164-37166, 37199-37208, 37274-37278 in November (road 923-924, 904-919); 39376-39379, 39415-39420 in February 2013 (road 925-934).

While Baldwin was building large batches of K-class Mikados (Locobase 44), its subsidiary roads were buying smaller amounts. Part of the Southern's Queen & Crescent Route, the railroad's infamous "Rathole Division" in Kentucky and Tennessee demanded as much tractive power as its limited tunnel clearances would permit.

Like the other Ks, these engines were delivered without arch tubes, although the specs state that the firebox's arch could accept them later. By the end of the 'teens, all would be equipped with 32 sq ft (2.95 sq m) of arch tubes and have their boiler pressures set to 180 psi (12.4 bar).

All of the 900s were renumbered by the Southern in 1917.


Class I / Ks / Ms-3 (Locobase 6095)

Data from the 1917 New Orleans & North Eastern locomotive diagram book supplied in March 2004 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. See also DeGolyer, Vol 50, pp. 256+. Works numbers were 41577-41579 in August 1914 and 42743-42744 in December 1915.

These Mikados and the Class H Pacifics delivered in the same year shared everything but driver diameter. Baldwin's specs noted that the rail weight was 75 lb/yard (37.5 kg/metre), maximum grade of 1%, and curves of up to 6 degrees.

The Southern first renumbered them 6910-6914, but reclassed them Ms-3 and gave them 6940-6944. Retirements began in November 1946, when the last four were withdrawn. The class leader was sold to the Emory River Railroad in March 1947.


Class K/Ms (Locobase 44)

Data from Southern Railway diagrams hosted on southern.railfan.net/images/archive/southern/steam_loco_diagrams (viewed September 2002) and DeGolyer, Volumes 38, pp. 270+; 42, pp. 296+; 43, pp. 31+; 48, pp. 175+; 50, pp. 307+. (Many thanks to Chris Hohl for his 22 September 2017 email reporting unlikely boiler pressure values for 177 entries. A Locobase macro caused the error .)

Baldwin's works numbers were:

1911

October 37085-37099, 37129-37135

1912

November 38890-38903

December 38943-38947, 38996-38999

1913

January 39000-39001, 39105-39109

1914

April 41337-41346

May 41357-41371

Alco's Richmond works numbers beginning in 1914 were: 54675-54691, 54770-54774.

Although North American railroads are known for their semi-custom attitudes in purchasing similar, but not interchangeable, locomotives from commercial builders, some of the systems bought hundreds of engines built to the same specifications.

These Mikados are a good example of such a program. Between 1911 and 1917, the Southern, its subsidiaries, and the Mobile & Ohio bought K-class superheated locomotives. See the following Locobases for the entries for each railroad:

44 (current entry) Southern 135

13796 Mobile & Ohio 21

16040 CNO&TP 35

16039 Virginia & Southwestern 10

The Southern's buy amounted to 135 of these Mikes from Baldwin and Richmond over six years. The diagram, dated 1911, gives only the evaporative heating surface. The Baldwin spec shows an original calculation for the superheater area of 837 sq ft (77.75 m), but a 21 October 1913 inked correction reports 699 sq ft. Piston valves measured 14" (356 mm) in diameter. All of the Ks were delivered with fireboxes able to accept arch tubes, but not fitted with them. By the end of the 'teens, all would be equipped with 32 sq ft (2.95 sq m) of arch tubes and have their boiler pressures set to 180 psi (12.4 bar).

Baldwin produced road numbers 4501-4603, 4624-4633 while Richmond supplied 4604-4623 and 4634-4635. All of this class had Walschaerts gear except the following engines, which had Southern gear: 4579-4623, 4634-4635, and 6605.

Beginning in 1915, at least seven of the Southern engines -- 4535-4539 and 4576 -- were fitted with a "tractor" on the tender, essentially converting the tender into a 2-8-0 with 18x24" cylinders. In place of the usual two bogie trucks, the design placed the tender tank and bunker on a frame that held the cylinders, Four evenly spaced axles holding 50" (1,270 mm) wheels and a single axle at the front with 30" (762 mm) wheels. (The Erie and Virginian Triplexes used similar tender engines.) Thus equipped, the tender weighed 230,000 lb (104,326 kg( fully loaded and developed 23,100 lb (10,478 kg) starting tractive effort. (4561 received a 2-6-0 tender engine set up.)

The July 1917 Popular Mechanics magazine (p. 45) described the result as a "duplex" engine and said the design was a response to congestion on the 68-mile (109.5 km), notoriously adversely graded, single-tracked Saluda grade in western North Carolina. In service, the PM article claimed, the duplex could move 30% more tons per train than could its non-duplex duplicate. A moment's thought will show that as the boiler and grate weren't enlarged, this bonus had limited duration before the whole assembly ran out of puff.

Another problem, which to a lesser extent also affected Beyer-Garratt locomotives, was that as the tender used up its water and coal, its factor of adhesion dropped considerably with greater slipping and loss of traction. It's also not clear to Locobase how steam admission was coordinated between the large cylinders forward and the smaller cylinders behind. As might be expected, the tender tractors were removed in a few years.


Class Ms-1 (Locobase 1428)

Data from tables and diagram in 1930 Locomotive Cyclopedia, SRY 1- 1926 List & Description of Locomotives supplied in April 2004 and SRY 5 - 1929 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange

Southern's USRA light Mikes came as a 25-engine batch from Schenectady in 1918; these engines used Walschaert valve gear. Works numbers were 59615-59629 for the Southern itself and 59630-59639 designated for the Cincinnati, New Orleans & Texas Pacific.

So successful was this standard design that the Southern ordered another 45 from Alco-Richmond in 1922-1923. Richmond supplied 63425-63434 and 63553-63567 to the CNO & TP in 1922 and 64842-64851 to the Southern in 1923. These all worked Southern valve gear.


Class Ms-4 (Locobase 6485)

Data from Allen Stanley's collection of locomotive diagram books. This class was shown on a diagram dated May 21, 1943. Works numbers were 66834-66851.

See Locobase 36 for the baseline Ms-4. This set of 18 (and most likely the 25 Baldwins delivered two years later) had fewer tubes and flues that were 2 feet longer each. To distribute the steam, the design was well-served by 16"-diameter piston valves with 7 inches of travel. A Duplex stoker and Elesco feedwater heater (mounted in its characteristic cylinder over the head light) were additional refinements.

According to Dale Roberts and Bill Schafer in Drury (1993), the Ms-4s in general were the standard freight engine all through the Southern system and would occasionally stand in for a passenger engine. The class was retired in 1952-1950.


Class Ms-4 (Locobase 36)

Data from table and diagram in 1930 Locomotive Cyclopedia and

southern.railfan.net/images/archive/southern/steam_loco_diagrams (viewed September 2002). See also DeGolyer, Volume 80, pp. 706+. (Many thanks to Chris Hohl for his 22 September 2017 email reporting unlikely boiler pressure values for 177 entries. A Locobase macro caused the error .)

These were the USRA Heavy Mikado designs with enhancements. Firebox heating surface area included 49 sq ft (4.55 sq m) in the combustion chamber and 28 sq ft (2.6 sq m) in arch tubes. Fourteen inch (356 mm) piston valves admitted steam to the cylinders. Water was pre-heated by feed water heaters from Elesco, Worthington, and Coffin.

Used in fast freight (and occasional passenger) service through World War II.

4800-4839 Richmond 1923 (works numbers 64802-64841)

4840-4884 Alco 1924, 1926 (works numbers 66034-66879) with Baker valve gear

4885-4914 Baldwin 1928 (works numbers 60392-60442) with Walschaerts gear

115 total;

51 others on the CNO&TP (Richmond, 1926, works numbers 66834-66851, road #s 6320-6337) -- see Locobase 6485; Baldwin, 1928, works numbers 60450-60494, road #s 6350-6374) and Alabama Great Southern (Richmond, 1926, works numbers 66852-66859, road #s 6622-6629).


Class Ms-6 - 57"" (Locobase 11084)

Data from table and diagram in SRY 5 - 1943 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

Four of the Ss-1 Santa Fes (see Locobase 1427) -- 5205, 5227, 5244, 5228 -- were truncated in 1929-1931 to create low-drivered Mikados. They retained their original frames, but and apparently the same boilers (at least the same tube and flue counts - which were shared by the Ms-4 class described in Locobase 36), but the boilers at least were cut down by 5 1/2 feet.

This was part of a larger conversion program that was interrupted by the impact of the Depression on traffic volume and revenue. The 4 Ms-6 engines remained in service until 1952.

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class101/K/Ms301/K/Ms306/K/Ms900/K/MsI / Ks / Ms-3
Locobase ID16,039 16,041 11,077 16,040 6095
RailroadVirginia & Southwestern (SRS)Alabama Great Southern (SRS)Alabama Great Southern (SRS)Cincinnati New Orleans & Texas Pacific (SRS)New Orleans & North Eastern (SRS)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-22-8-22-8-22-8-22-8-2
Number in Class1066355
Road Numbers101-111/4624-4633301-306/6600-6605306-311 / 6606-6611900-934/6250-6283500-504 / 6940-6944
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built1066355
BuilderBaldwinseveralLimaBaldwinBaldwin
Year19111913191719111914
Valve GearWalschaertvariousWalschaert or SthrnWalschaertWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)16.50 / 5.0316.50 / 5.0316.50 / 5.0316.50 / 5.0315 / 4.57
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)34.75 / 10.5934.75 / 10.5934.75 / 10.5934.75 / 10.5933.50 / 10.21
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.47 0.47 0.47 0.47 0.45
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)67.04 / 20.4467.04 / 20.4366.87 / 20.3867.04 / 20.4367.58 / 20.60
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)54,940 / 24,92060,400 / 27,39754,940 / 24,920
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)212,300 / 96,298215,700 / 97,840231,000 / 104,780215,700 / 97,840160,000 / 72,575
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)269,000 / 122,016272,940 / 123,804295,000 / 133,810272,940 / 123,804209,500 / 95,028
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)153,000 / 69,400153,000 / 69,400153,000 / 69,400153,000 / 69,400154,000 / 69,853
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)422,000 / 191,416425,940 / 193,204448,000 / 203,210425,940 / 193,204363,500 / 164,881
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)8000 / 30.308000 / 30.308000 / 30.308000 / 30.307500 / 28.41
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)12 / 10.9012 / 10.9012 / 10.9012 / 10.9014 / 12.70
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)88 / 4490 / 4596 / 4890 / 4567 / 33.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)63 / 160063 / 160061.50 / 156263 / 160057 / 1448
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)175 / 12.10175 / 12.10200 / 13.80175 / 12.10200 / 13.80
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)27" x 30" / 686x76227" x 30" / 686x76227" x 30" / 686x76227" x 30" / 686x76222" x 28" / 559x711
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)51,638 / 23422.6351,638 / 23422.6360,454 / 27421.5151,638 / 23422.6340,418 / 18333.32
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.11 4.18 3.82 4.18 3.96
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)121 / 17.74191 / 17.74217 / 20.17191 / 17.74200 / 18.59
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)53.30 / 4.9554 / 5.0262 / 5.7654 / 5.0246 / 4.28
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)3198 / 297.103198 / 297.103583 / 332.993198 / 297.102573 / 239.13
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)699 / 64.94699 / 64.94922 / 85.69699 / 64.94546 / 50.74
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)3897 / 362.043897 / 362.044505 / 418.683897 / 362.043119 / 289.87
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume160.86160.86180.23160.86208.86
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation9328945012,40094509200
Same as above plus superheater percentage11,00611,15114,88011,15110,856
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area24,98739,44252,08039,44247,200
Power L19330965313,370965313,090
Power MT387.55394.64510.40394.64721.46

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassK/MsMs-1Ms-4Ms-4Ms-6 - 57""
Locobase ID44 1428 6485 36 11,084
RailroadSouthern (SRS)Southern (SRS)Cincinnati, New Orleans & Texas Pacific (SRS)Southern (SRS)Southern (SRS)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-22-8-22-8-22-8-22-8-2
Number in Class13570181224
Road Numbers4500-46354750-4774, 6285-63296320-63374800-4914+4995-4997, 4999
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built1357018122
BuilderseveralAlcoSeveralSeveralSouthern
Year19111918192619231929
Valve GearWalschaert or SthrnvariousWalschaertBaker or WalschaertWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)16.50 / 5.0316.80 / 5.1216.50 / 5.0316.75 / 5.1116.50 / 5.03
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)34.75 / 10.5936.10 / 1135 / 10.6736.92 / 11.2535.83 / 10.92
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.47 0.47 0.47 0.45 0.46
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)67.04 / 20.4371.38 / 21.7667.37 / 20.5371.68 / 21.8571.45 / 21.78
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)54,940 / 24,92056,000 / 25,40160,700 / 27,53360,400 / 27,397
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)215,700 / 97,840221,500 / 100,471249,000 / 112,945239,500 / 108,636237,700 / 107,819
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)272,940 / 123,804290,800 / 131,905329,400 / 149,414326,000 / 147,871318,300 / 144,379
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)153,000 / 69,400184,560 / 83,715180,750 / 81,987191,600 / 86,908188,300 / 85,412
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)425,940 / 193,204475,360 / 215,620510,150 / 231,401517,600 / 234,779506,600 / 229,791
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)8000 / 30.3010,000 / 37.889000 / 34.0910,000 / 37.8810,000 / 37.88
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)12 / 10.9014 / 12.7020 / 18.2016 / 14.5016 / 14.50
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)90 / 4592 / 46104 / 52100 / 5099 / 49.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)63 / 160063 / 160063 / 160063 / 160057 / 1448
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)180 / 12.40200 / 13.80200 / 13.80200 / 13.80200 / 13.80
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)27" x 30" / 686x76226" x 30" / 660x76227" x 32" / 686x81327" x 32" / 686x81327" x 32" / 686x813
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)53,113 / 24091.6854,724 / 24822.4262,949 / 28553.2262,949 / 28553.2269,575 / 31558.73
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.06 4.05 3.96 3.80 3.42
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)212 / 19.70280 / 26.02263 / 24.44305 / 28.34373 / 34.67
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)53.30 / 4.9566.70 / 6.2070 / 6.5170.30 / 6.5376.30 / 7.09
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)3231 / 300.283783 / 351.584104 / 381.414285 / 398.233721 / 345.82
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)699 / 64.96882 / 81.97843 / 78.35993 / 92.29836 / 77.70
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)3930 / 365.244665 / 433.554947 / 459.765278 / 490.524557 / 423.52
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume162.52205.21193.53202.07175.47
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation959413,34014,00014,06015,260
Same as above plus superheater percentage11,32115,87516,38016,73118,007
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area45,02966,64061,54272,59088,028
Power L110,06014,94712,88014,60411,746
Power MT411.28595.08456.15537.72435.77

Photos

Reference