Burlington & Missouri River / Chicago, Burlington & Quincy / Colorado & Southern / Jacksonville Southeastern / Wichita Valley 4-4-0 "American" Locomotives in the USA


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class 317/A-2 (Locobase 5551)

Data from Corbin & Kerka (Steam Locomotives of the Burlington Route, 1960, p. 28). See also DeGolyer, Volume 9, p. 112. Works numbers were 4696 in June 1879, 4697-4698, 4700-4702, 4705, 4707 in July, 4769-4771, 4773, 4777 in September.

Aside from noting the wagon-top boiler and 28" (711 mm) steam dome over the firebox, Corbin & Kerka's description counted the rocking grates, injector, two brass feed pumps, and diamond stack with a 16" (406 mm) minimum diameter.

They were later grouped with a heterogeneous assembly of contemporary locomotives in the A-2 class.


Class 47 (Locobase 5558)

Data from a May 1, 1858 table prepared by CG Hammond, General Superintendent of the CB&Q shown in Corbin & Kerka (1960), pp 254-255. Works numbers were 34-35, 39-42 in July 1856. Road numbers were 51-52, 47-50, respectively.

The builders' data comes from a table compiled by B. Rumary based on information from Jeremy Lambert and supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004.

The boiler pressure is estimated. The grate area, firebox heating surface, and total heating surface are calculated. See Locobase 5552 for full explanation. While the dimensions are not derived from actual measurement, they agree with those of similar American 4-4-0s of the era.

This series of coal-burning, outside-connected freight locomotives had a bigger cylinder volume to satisfy with fewer tubes in a boiler that was nonetheless 19' long. Locobase 5559 shows the the taller-drivered, smaller-cylinder variant.


Class 53 (Locobase 5559)

Data from a May 1, 1858 table prepared by CG Hammond, General Superintendent of the CB&Q shown in Corbin & Kerka (1960), pp 254-255. Works numbers were 36-38 in July 1856.

The builders' data comes from a table compiled by B. Rumary based on information from Jeremy Lambert and supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004.

The boiler pressure is estimated. The grate area, firebox heating surface, and total heating surface are calculated. See Locobase 5552 for full explanation. While the dimensions are not derived from actual measurement, they agree with those of similar American 4-4-0s of the era.

A quartet of coal-burning, outside-connected, mixed-service locomotives that shared many components with Manchester's 47-52 (Locobase 5558) , including a 19' foot long boiler and the same number and diameter of firetubes. But the tubes were 6" longer and the grate was bigger.


Class 57 (Locobase 5562)

Data from a May 1, 1858 table prepared by CG Hammond, General Superintendent of the CB&Q shown in Corbin & Kerka (1960), pp 254-255.

The boiler pressure is estimated. The grate area, firebox heating surface, and total heating surface are calculated. See Locobase 5552 for full explanation. While the dimensions are not derived from actual measurement, they agree with those of similar American 4-4-0s of the era.

Pair of Rogers wood burners. 57 had 14 1/2" cylinders, both had a boiler 18' 2" long.


Class 7 (Locobase 11616)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines, as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Vol 15, p. 73. Works numbers were 9924, 9948 in April 1889 and 10437 in November.

The Jacksonville Southeastern operated between Jacksonville, Ill and Mount Vernon, which lay 184 miles asway. The first two of the trio of Eight-wheelers were lettered for the JS while the 19 wore C P & St L for the Chicago, Peoria & St Louis, a subsidiary "organized in the interest" of the JS.

In any case, the next year saw them taken in by the Jacksonville Louisville & Saint Louis after a consolidation and reorganization, a process repeated 6 years later in 1896 and resulting in the Jacksonville & St Louis.

NB: These engines, those of the Wilmington & Northern of the same year (Locobase 15808), and the pair delivered to the Spokane Falls & Northern in 1890 (Locobase 8864) were virtually identical in all boiler and firebox dimensions. The SF&N heating surface areas are given in the Great Northern's diagrams and Locobase bases his estimate of direct heating surface on a slightly longer grate in the JS and W&N.


Class A-1 (Locobase 2566)

Data from a locomotive diagram published on Vernon Beck's website -- http://home.earthlink.net/~vnlbeck/A/a17191a.tif (accessed 22 March 2003). A note on the 1912 diagram says that engines 108 & 109 of this class "carry 160# of steam." Other measurements indicate that at least some of this class ran on 64" drivers.

Corbin & Kerka (1960, p 185) show a slightly larger heating surface area -- 1,245 sq ft -- but otherwise identical numbers.


Class A-2 (1868) (Locobase 5449)

Data from a locomotive diagram published on Vernon Beck's website -- http://home.earthlink.net/~vnlbeck/A/a2d2.tif (accessed 22 March 2003).

The builder and numbers come from Corbin & Kerka (1960), p 258.


Class A-3 (Locobase 5451)

Data from a locomotive diagram published on Vernon Beck's website -- http://home.earthlink.net/~vnlbeck/A/a2d2.tif (accessed 22 March 2003). Rupert Gamlen's roster (accessed 29 March 2003) tells us that 27 of these were built from 1870 to 1887. The diagram shows that at least two of them originally were numbered 110-111 and came from the Quincy, Omaha & Kansas City Railway, a predecessor railway that was known as "The OK Route".

Corbin & Kerka's (1960, p 261) summary shows a wide variety of builders and dates -- Baldwin, Danforth Cooke, Manchester, and several Burlington shop locations (Galesburgh, Plattsmouth, Beardstown). Four originally operated with the Burlington & Missouri River (as 26, 79, 115, 139; later 414, 420, 422, 423).


Class A-5 (Locobase 8513)

Data from CB&Q Asstd Steam Loco Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

This designation covers several different locomotives rebuilt by the CB & Q in 1879, 1884, 1885, & 1896.


Class Antelope (Locobase 5554)

Data from a May 1, 1858 table prepared by CG Hammond, General Superintendent of the CB&Q shown in Corbin & Kerka (1960), pp 254-255.

The boiler pressure is estimated. The grate area, firebox heating surface, and total heating surface are calculated. See Locobase 5552 for full explanation. While the dimensions are not derived from actual measurement, they agree with those of similar American 4-4-0s of the era.

About the only common dimensions for this class were the boiler length and diameter as well as the tube length.

The four engines had different combinations of tube number, firebox dimensions, and driver diameter:

As presented in Hammond's table, they were:

Name Driver Diam Tube # FB Lgth Width Height

Antelope 72" 147 3'11" 3'2" 4'10"

Reindeer 68" 147 3'10" 3'1" 4'10"

Panther 72" 147 3'10" 3'1" 4' 7"

Roebuck 66" 149 3'10" 3'1" 4'10"


Class Batavia (Locobase 5556)

Data from a May 1, 1858 table prepared by CG Hammond, General Superintendent of the CB&Q shown in Corbin & Kerka (1960), pp 254-255.

The boiler pressure is estimated. The grate area, firebox heating surface, and total heating surface are calculated. See Locobase 5552 for full explanation. While the dimensions are not derived from actual measurement, they agree with those of similar American 4-4-0s of the era.

These two wood-burners -- the other was named "Excelsior" -- were built in the same year as the Manchester coal-burner "Wataga". Given how close all of the principal dimensions were, these might have been used as "controls" in an attempt to determine the benefits of coal-fired operation. According to Corbin & Kerka, the decision was made by 1857 to go with coal entirely.


Class C-2-E (Locobase 7362)

Data from the Wichita Valley 1 - 1915 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

The Wichita Valley Railway was an 1890 brainchild of Morgan Jones and Grenville Dodge; the latter partner had overseen the construction of the Union Pacific's transcontinental line in the 1860s. The termini for the WVR were more modest, but still considerable -- a main line from Wichita Falls 300 miles west to Seymour at the state line. It's not clear from the Handbook of Texas account -- http://www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online/articles/WW/eqw17.html (accessed 2 Jan 2005) -- how far the builders actually got. In 1905, the Colorado & Southern gained control and when the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy snapped up the C & S in 1908, the WVR became a separately operated subsidiary. At that time, the WVR leased the Wichita Falls Railroad and the Abilene & Northern to connect Abilene and Wichita Falls.

Most of the locomotives in the diagram book were purchased from other railroads. The diagram page shows that #3 was originally OC number 13. These locomotives came from a relatively early time in the life of the Schenectady Works and had works #2120 & 2117, respectively. #2, which was produced 4 years later, had a slightly larger firebox and four more tubes (186) and a 3" longer spread between the drivers.

It was "obsolete" and "dismantled" before the book was published on 1 Jan 1915.


Class C-2-J-1 / C-2-H (Locobase 7363)

Data from the Wichita Valley 1 - 1915 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

These were produced a year after the Schenectady engines shown in Locobase 7362 and were very similar. Their power dimensions were identical except for the Cooke locomotives' 3" smaller drivers. The boilers had a few fewer tubes and the grate was a bit smaller as well.

Locobase notes that No. 10 originally served the Fort Worth & Denver as its #9, but that its characteristics are essentially identical to those of the 4-5.

By 1915 all three were characterized as "obsolete".


Class C-2-L (Locobase 7685)

Data from C & S 6 -1941 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

From the data on the table at the beginning of the diagram book, this Eight-wheeler was bought new by the C & S and appears to have been part of a larger class of possibly 5 locomotives or more. It was later modified as an inspection engine. A small house was mounted on the long pilot (cowcatcher) to house one or two inspectors as they looked over the track and right of way.


Class Challenge (Locobase 5568)

Data from a May 1, 1858 table prepared by CG Hammond, General Superintendent of the CB&Q shown in Corbin & Kerka (1960), pp 254-255.

The boiler pressure is estimated. The grate area, firebox heating surface, and total heating surface are calculated. See Locobase 5552 for full explanation. While the dimensions are not derived from actual measurement, they agree with those of similar American 4-4-0s of the era.

This outside-connected wood-burner had a relatively long boiler measured at 19' 6".


Class Garden City (Locobase 5560)

Data from a May 1, 1858 table prepared by CG Hammond, General Superintendent of the CB&Q shown in Corbin & Kerka (1960), pp 254-255.

The boiler pressure is estimated. The grate area, firebox heating surface, and total heating surface are calculated. See Locobase 5552 for full explanation. While the dimensions are not derived from actual measurement, they agree with those of similar American 4-4-0s of the era.

One of two Chicago LW engines shown on Hammonds' table, this is a wood burner with a relatively small-diameter, 17' 6" long boiler packing a large number of firetubes.


Class Invincible (Locobase 5569)

Data from a May 1, 1858 table prepared by CG Hammond, General Superintendent of the CB&Q shown in Corbin & Kerka (1960), pp 254-255.

The boiler pressure is estimated. The grate area, firebox heating surface, and total heating surface are calculated. See Locobase 5552 for full explanation. While the dimensions are not derived from actual measurement, they agree with those of similar American 4-4-0s of the era.

This outside-connected coal-burner is the alternate-fuel version of the Challenge. Like the latter engine, this one had a relatively long boiler measured at 19' 6". But the firebox is much longer, narrower, and shallower than the Challenger.


Class Little Indian (Locobase 5565)

Data from a May 1, 1858 table prepared by CG Hammond, General Superintendent of the CB&Q shown in Corbin & Kerka (1960), pp 254-255.

The boiler pressure is estimated. The grate area, firebox heating surface, and total heating surface are calculated. See Locobase 5552 for full explanation. While the dimensions are not derived from actual measurement, they agree with those of similar American 4-4-0s of the era.

Was this coal-burner an 8-wheeler? The table gives a tube length of 7 ft, but the boiler is said to be 18' 10". So the tube number is not right.


Class M / A-6 (Locobase 7690)

Data from CB&Q 3 - 1953 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. The present entry refers only to the six Pittsburgh-built locomotives (works# 1829-1834) that much later were designated A-6. the first 4 went to the Hannibal & St Joseph as 633, 636, 645, and 653; these later became the Kansas City & Council Bluffs. The St. Louis, Keokuk and Northwestern Railroad took the other two as 746-747.

By the time the 1953 diagram book was published, the single survivor of the 1890s class supplied by Pittsburgh was marked VOID in large letters. The diagram notes that the boiler might be pressed to 160 psi (tractive effort 15,300 lb) or 170 psi as shown; the design used a Belpaire firebox. The dome sat over the first driven axle.

Throughout its career, the essentials of this saturated-steam, Stephenson-valve-gear actuated Eight-wheeler remained intact, except for the front truck. Originally delivered with wheels measuring 37 1/4" in diameter, the A-6 later ran on 33" wheels.

Retirements began with one in December 1922 (197), followed by two in June 1927 (196 & 198), one in August 1927 (199), one in July 1928 (194), and the last in July 1929 (195).


Class Moonlight (Locobase 5571)

Data from a May 1, 1858 table prepared by CG Hammond, General Superintendent of the CB&Q shown in Corbin & Kerka (1960), pp 254-255. Works number not available.

The boiler pressure is estimated. The grate area, firebox heating surface, and total heating surface are calculated. See Locobase 5552 for full explanation. While the dimensions are not derived from actual measurement, they agree with those of similar American 4-4-0s of the era.

In this inside-connected, coal-burning class, the boilers measured 19' 9". Starlight (see Locobase 5570) was very similar, but had 2" tubes.


Class Number One (Locobase 5575)

Data from a May 1, 1858 table prepared by CG Hammond, General Superintendent of the CB&Q shown in Corbin & Kerka (1960), pp 254-255.

The boiler pressure is estimated. The grate area, firebox heating surface, and total heating surface are calculated. See Locobase 5552 for full explanation. While the dimensions are not derived from actual measurement, they agree with those of similar American 4-4-0s of the era.

The first Amoskeag for the Burlington, it's not clear when this engine actually came on the line or from what earlier railroad. It was an inside-connected wood-burner with a 16' 10" boiler.


Class Stag Hound (Locobase 5552)

The whole series of 4-4-0s from 1855-1857 come from a table prepared by CG Hammond, General Superintendent of the CB&Q to show the railroad's motive power as of 1 May 1858. It is reproduced in Bernard G. Corbin & William F. Kerka, Steam Locomotives of the Burlington Route, (Corbin-Kerka, 1960), pp 254-255.

The boiler pressure is an estimate. The grate area is calculated by multiplying the length and width given in the table; the firebox heating surface is likewise calculated using the height. The evaporative heating surface is calculated by adding the firebox heating surface to the outside surface area of the tubes. While the dimensions are not derived from actual measurement, they agree with those of similar American 4-4-0s of the era.

In this inside-connected class, Fox Hound had the same driver diameter while Grey Hound appropriately had taller drivers at 68". The boilers measured 17' 8".


Class Starlight (Locobase 5570)

Data from a May 1, 1858 table prepared by CG Hammond, General Superintendent of the CB&Q shown in Corbin & Kerka (1960), pp 254-255. Works number unavailable, built in August 1857.

The boiler pressure is estimated. The grate area, firebox heating surface, and total heating surface are calculated. See Locobase 5552 for full explanation. While the dimensions are not derived from actual measurement, they agree with those of similar American 4-4-0s of the era.

In this inside-connected, coal-burning class, the boilers measured 19' 9". Moonlight (see Locobase 5571), the earlier of the two in this class, had interesting differences including larger-diameter firetubes. Corbin & Kerka's photo (p.22) shows the long stride the unusually long barrel gave to this class. When rebuilt, the bell was moved forward to near the stack and a sand dome sat on the boiler just ahead of the first driving axle.

Note on coal: In 1860, the Merchant Magazine and Commercial Review (William B Dana, ed) reprinted an article from the Journal of Mining, Manufactures, and Art (which in turn excerpted it from the Chicago Press & Tribune). Its comments on the relative merits of wood and coal, particularly the toll taken by the former on the forests of Illinois, are worth preserving:

"Coal mining, in this State, is in its infancy. We do not even supply the home demand. At Kewanee, the shipments are six thousand tons per month, most of which is used in the locomotives on the Chicago. Burlington, and Quincy Railroad, which consume at present twelve hundred tons per week. Compared with wood for railroad uses, coal is cheaper by forty per cent, a fact very gratifying to our citizens, who have hitherto mourned the loss of our beautiful groves. Nine-tenths of the fuel used on the Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy Railroad is coal. The roads of the West arc generally using coal instead of wood. A few more improvements in locomotives, adapting them to the peculiar qualities of coal, will result in a complete change in its favor for railway uses. The economy of speed and power demands it."

(See the earlier comments from The Mining Magazine of January 1856 in Locobase 11176.)


Class Stranger (Locobase 5561)

Data from a May 1, 1858 table prepared by CG Hammond, General Superintendent of the CB&Q shown in Corbin & Kerka (1960), pp 254-255.

The boiler pressure is estimated. The grate area, firebox heating surface, and total heating surface are calculated. See Locobase 5552 for full explanation. While the dimensions are not derived from actual measurement, they agree with those of similar American 4-4-0s of the era.

One of two Chicago LW engines shown on Hammonds' table, this is the coal burner with a relatively small-diameter boiler measuring 18', a large grate for the time, and fewer fire tubes than the Garden City.


Class Troubadour (Locobase 5555)

Data from a May 1, 1858 table prepared by CG Hammond, General Superintendent of the CB&Q shown in Corbin & Kerka (1960), pp 254-255. Works numbers were 1-6 in March-May 1855.

The builders' data comes from a table compiled by B. Rumary based on information from Jeremy Lambert and supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004. Note that according to their builder's numbers, this sextet were the very first locomotives to be built by this New Hampshire firm.

The boiler pressure is estimated. The grate area, firebox heating surface, and total heating surface are calculated. See Locobase 5552 for full explanation. While the dimensions are not derived from actual measurement, they agree with those of similar American 4-4-0s of the era.

These outside-connected engines had smallish grates but longer boiler tubes. The boilers measured 18'.

Troubador is credited starting service on the Chicago & Aurora. The other engines were Talisman (CB&Q), Cossack, Arab, Corsair (all Central Military Track), & Tartar (CB&Q). One is shown with 68" drivers, but that's likely a misprint. Troubadour and Talisman weighed in at 54,000 lb.


Class Wataga (Locobase 5564)

Data from a May 1, 1858 table prepared by CG Hammond, General Superintendent of the CB&Q shown in Corbin & Kerka (1960), pp 254-255. Builder's info from B Rumary's compilation supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004.

The boiler pressure is estimated. The grate area, firebox heating surface, and total heating surface are calculated. See Locobase 5552 for full explanation. While the dimensions are not derived from actual measurement, they agree with those of similar American 4-4-0s of the era.

Relatively large coal-burner with a 19' long boiler. Could be seen as a prototype for the 47 class that came a couple of years later.


Class West Wind (Locobase 5553)

Data from a May 1, 1858 table prepared by CG Hammond, General Superintendent of the CB&Q shown in Corbin & Kerka (1960), pp 254-255. Works numbers were 15-19 in August-October 1855.

The builders' data comes from a table compiled by B. Rumary based on information from Jeremy Lambert and supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004.

The boiler pressure is an estimate. The grate area, firebox heating surface, and total heating surface are calculated. See Locobase 5552 for full explanation. While the dimensions are not derived from actual measurement, they agree with those of similar American 4-4-0s of the era.

In the same year that Amoskeag delivered the Hounds, Manchester contributed this inside-connected class with slightly larger grates. The boilers measured 17' 8" long. The other engines were North Wind, South Wind, Grey Eagle, and Golden Eagle.


Class Whirlwind (Locobase 5557)

Data from a May 1, 1858 table prepared by CG Hammond, General Superintendent of the CB&Q shown in Corbin & Kerka (1960), pp 254-255.

The boiler pressure is estimated. The grate area, firebox heating surface, and total heating surface are calculated. See Locobase 5552 for full explanation. While the dimensions are not derived from actual measurement, they agree with those of similar American 4-4-0s of the era.

Four "weather phenomena" locomotives, inside-connected, identical except for cylinder stroke. All had 17'5" boilers. Hurricane & Tornado had 20" stroke, Whirlwind and Tempest a 22" stroke as shown here.

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class317/A-24753577
Locobase ID5551 5558 5559 5562 11,616
RailroadBurlington & Missouri River (CB&Q)Chicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q)Chicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q)Chicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q)Jacksonville Southeastern (CB&Q)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class136423
Road Numbers317-324, 337-34147-5253-567-8, 19
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built136423
BuilderBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoManchesterManchesterRogers, Ketchum & GrosvenorBurnham, Parry, Williams & Co
Year18791857185618541889
Valve GearStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)7 / 2.13 8.50 / 2.59
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)22.02 / 6.7122.42 / 6.83
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.32 0.38
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)46,300 / 21,00152,400 / 23,768
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)72,500 / 32,88560,000 / 27,21660,000 / 27,21652,000 / 23,58781,950 / 37,172
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)2750 / 10.421800 / 6.821800 / 6.823000 / 11.36
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)39 / 19.5044 / 22
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)63 / 160057 / 144860 / 152460 / 152463 / 1600
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)130 / 9100 / 6.90100 / 6.90100 / 6.90130 / 9
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)17" x 24" / 432x61016" x 24" / 406x61015" x 24" / 381x61015" x 22" / 381x55917" x 24" / 432x610
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)12,166 / 5518.419162 / 4155.827650 / 3469.997013 / 3181.0512,166 / 5518.41
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.81 4.31
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)113 / 10.5051.80 / 4.8156.77 / 5.2857 / 5.30116 / 10.78
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)16 / 1.4915.67 / 1.4616.63 / 1.5512 / 1.1216.70 / 1.55
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1277 / 118.68831 / 77.23873 / 81.13886 / 82.341278 / 118.73
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1277 / 118.68831 / 77.23873 / 81.13886 / 82.341278 / 118.73
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume202.54148.79177.85196.90202.70
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation20801567166312002171
Same as above plus superheater percentage20801567166312002171
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area14,69051805677570015,080
Power L139881854235726024022
Power MT379.79338.43

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassA-1A-2 (1868)A-3A-5Antelope
Locobase ID2566 5449 5451 8513 5554
RailroadChicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q)Chicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q)Chicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q)Chicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q)Chicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class15322744
Road Numbers1-153247-248400-426461-464
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built15322744
BuilderManchesterseveralCB & QAmoskeag
Year18801868187018791853
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m) 8.50 / 2.59 8.50 / 2.59 8.50 / 2.598 / 2.44
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)22.52 / 6.8622.52 / 6.8623.25 / 7.0921.79 / 6.64
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.38 0.38 0.37 0.37
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)45 / 13.7245.10 / 13.7543.21 / 13.17
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)27,500 / 12,47428,200 / 12,79124,450 / 11,090
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)54,500 / 24,72155,800 / 25,31060,000 / 27,21648,400 / 21,954
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)82,800 / 37,55789,700 / 40,68790,000 / 40,82371,600 / 32,47752,000 / 23,587
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)71,650 / 32,50067,400 / 30,57272,000 / 32,65958,150 / 26,376
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)154,450 / 70,057157,100 / 71,259162,000 / 73,482129,750 / 58,853
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)3800 / 14.392750 / 10.423000 / 11.362900 / 10.98
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT) 7.50 / 6.80 7.30 / 6.607 / 6.406 / 5.50
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)45 / 22.5047 / 23.5050 / 2540 / 20
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)69 / 175369 / 175362 / 157564 / 162668 / 1727
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)145 / 10140 / 9.70140 / 9.70160 / 11100 / 6.90
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)18" x 24" / 457x61017" x 24" / 432x61017" x 24" / 432x61015" x 22" / 381x55916" x 20" / 406x508
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)13,890 / 6300.4111,962 / 5425.8813,313 / 6038.6810,519 / 4771.346400 / 2902.99
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.92 4.66 4.51 4.60
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)112 / 10.41122 / 11.34123 / 11.4389.60 / 8.3357.13 / 5.31
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)17.60 / 1.6417.50 / 1.6317.50 / 1.6316.30 / 1.5111.82 / 1.10
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1190 / 110.591166 / 108.361331 / 123.70872 / 81.04833 / 77.42
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1190 / 110.591166 / 108.361331 / 123.70872 / 81.04833 / 77.42
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume168.35184.93211.10193.79178.98
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation25522450245026081182
Same as above plus superheater percentage25522450245026081182
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area16,24017,08017,22014,3365713
Power L141284535446550072724
Power MT333.97358.35328.12456.14

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassBataviaC-2-EC-2-J-1 / C-2-HC-2-LChallenge
Locobase ID5556 7362 7363 7685 5568
RailroadChicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q)Wichita Valley (CB&Q)Wichita Valley (CB&Q)Colorado & Southern (CB&Q)Chicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class22221
Road Numbers1, 34-5, 10134
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built22221
BuilderAmoskeagSchenectadyCookeCookeAmoskeag
Year18531887188818881853
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m) 8.50 / 2.59 8.50 / 2.59 8.50 / 2.59
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)23 / 7.0123.25 / 7.0923.08 / 7.03
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.37 0.37 0.37
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)44.67 / 13.6245.54 / 13.8844.42 / 13.54
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)27,000 / 12,247
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)48,450 / 21,97748,650 / 22,06754,000 / 24,494
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)48,000 / 21,77279,000 / 35,83479,200 / 35,92581,000 / 36,74156,000 / 25,401
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)76,500 / 34,70076,500 / 34,70078,390 / 35,557
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)155,500 / 70,534155,700 / 70,625159,390 / 72,298
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)3500 / 13.263500 / 13.263000 / 11.36
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)7 / 6.407 / 6.407 / 6.40
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)40 / 2041 / 20.5045 / 22.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)54 / 137264 / 162661 / 154961 / 154956 / 1422
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)100 / 6.90145 / 10145 / 10140 / 9.70100 / 6.90
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)15" x 22" / 381x55917" x 24" / 432x61017" x 24" / 432x61017" x 24" / 432x61016" x 22" / 406x559
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)7792 / 3534.4013,357 / 6058.6414,014 / 6356.6513,531 / 6137.578549 / 3877.77
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.63 3.47 3.99
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)57.66 / 5.36108.50 / 10.08105.70 / 9.82118.46 / 11.0154.62 / 5.08
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)12.14 / 1.1317 / 1.5816.80 / 1.5616.98 / 1.5811.50 / 1.07
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)864 / 80.301089 / 101.211014 / 94.241120 / 104.09903 / 83.92
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)864 / 80.301089 / 101.211014 / 94.241120 / 104.09903 / 83.92
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume192.01172.72160.82177.64176.38
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation12142465243623771150
Same as above plus superheater percentage12142465243623771150
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area576615,73315,32716,5845462
Power L123054002360738652144
Power MT364.21326.91315.59

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassGarden CityInvincibleLittle IndianM / A-6Moonlight
Locobase ID5560 5569 5565 7690 5571
RailroadChicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q)Chicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q)Chicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q)Chicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q)Chicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class11161
Road Numbers471-476 / 194-19915
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built11161
BuilderChicago Locomotive WorksAmoskeagAmoskeagPittsburghNew Jersey Locomotive
Year18541853185318981856
Valve GearStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m) 8.50 / 2.59
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)22.96 / 7
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.37
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)48.29 / 14.72
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)35,000 / 15,876
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)68,000 / 30,844
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)52,000 / 23,58758,000 / 26,30850,000 / 22,680100,000 / 45,35964,000 / 29,030
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)94,700 / 42,955
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)194,700 / 88,314
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)5000 / 18.94
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)9 / 8.20
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)57 / 28.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)60 / 152456 / 142254 / 137269 / 175356 / 1422
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)100 / 6.90100 / 6.90100 / 6.90170 / 11.70100 / 6.90
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)15" x 22" / 381x55916" x 22" / 406x55915" x 22" / 381x55918" x 24" / 457x61016" x 20" / 406x508
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)7013 / 3181.058549 / 3877.777792 / 3534.4016,285 / 7386.767771 / 3524.87
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.18
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)53.44 / 4.9749.79 / 4.6373.89 / 6.87122.60 / 11.3954.03 / 5.02
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)11.87 / 1.1014.58 / 1.3614.78 / 1.3724.50 / 2.2815.44 / 1.43
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)916 / 85.13898 / 83.461421 / 132.06973 / 90.43
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)916 / 85.13898 / 83.461421 / 132.06973 / 90.43
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume203.57175.40201.03209.06
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation11871458147841651544
Same as above plus superheater percentage11871458147841651544
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area53444979738920,8425403
Power L12630209156262493
Power MT364.80

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassNumber OneStag HoundStarlightStrangerTroubadour
Locobase ID5575 5552 5570 5561 5555
RailroadChicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q)Chicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q)Chicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q)Chicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q)Chicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class13116
Road Numbers14
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built13116
BuilderAmoskeagAmoskeagNew Jersey LocomotiveChicago Locomotive WorksManchester
Year18511855185718541855
Valve Gear
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)38,000 / 17,23756,000 / 25,40164,000 / 29,03052,000 / 23,58756,000 / 25,401
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)48 / 121966 / 167658 / 147360 / 152460 / 1524
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)100 / 6.90100 / 6.90100 / 6.90100 / 6.90100 / 6.90
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)14" x 20" / 356x50816" x 20" / 406x50816" x 20" / 406x50815" x 22" / 381x55915" x 20" / 381x508
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)6942 / 3148.846594 / 2990.997503 / 3403.317013 / 3181.056375 / 2891.65
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort)
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)37 / 3.4464.31 / 5.9860.29 / 5.6067.69 / 6.2953.36 / 4.96
Grate Area (sq ft / m2) 9.25 / 0.8612.25 / 1.1416.25 / 1.5115.04 / 1.4011.43 / 1.06
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)779 / 72.40867 / 80.58867 / 80.58845 / 78.53759 / 70.54
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)779 / 72.40867 / 80.58867 / 80.58845 / 78.53759 / 70.54
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume218.61186.28186.28187.79185.55
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation9251225162515041143
Same as above plus superheater percentage9251225162515041143
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area37006431602967695336
Power L121642809242726302508
Power MT

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassWatagaWest WindWhirlwind
Locobase ID5564 5553 5557
RailroadChicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q)Chicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q)Chicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q)
CountryUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class152
Road Numbers
GaugeStdStdStd
Number Built152
BuilderManchesterManchesterAmoskeag
Year185318551853
Valve Gear
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)50,000 / 22,68056,000 / 25,40150,000 / 22,680
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)1800 / 6.82
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)56 / 142266 / 167660 / 1524
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)100 / 6.90100 / 6.90100 / 6.90
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)15" x 22" / 381x55916" x 20" / 406x50816" x 20" / 406x508
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)7513 / 3407.846594 / 2990.997253 / 3289.91
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort)
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)75.70 / 7.0467.87 / 6.3161.30 / 5.70
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)15.94 / 1.4812.93 / 1.2012.26 / 1.14
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)882 / 81.97904 / 84.01703 / 65.33
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)882 / 81.97904 / 84.01703 / 65.33
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume196.01194.23151.05
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation159412931226
Same as above plus superheater percentage159412931226
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area757067876130
Power L1261529392169
Power MT

Photos

Reference