Adirondack & St Lawrence / Central Vermont 4-4-0 "American" Locomotives in the USA


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class 1060 / C-X (Locobase 14546)

Data from Dimensions and Classifications of Locomotives of the NYC&HR et al, September 1905, p. 326. Works numbers were 561 (later road number 1061) and 563 (later raod number 1060).

In the 1905 guide, the New York Central assigned the same class ID to several locomotives of different, but relatively ancient, origins. Each variant was different enough that Locobase breaks them out into a series of entries (14544-14546). 1060 had 69"(1753 mm) drivers, 1061 rolled on 70"(1778 mm) wheels.


Class 324/C-28 (Locobase 14542)

Data from Dimensions and Classifications of Locomotives of the NYC&HR et al, September 1905, p. 323. See also DeGolyer, Volume16, p. 60. (Thanks to Chris Hohl for his 5 May 2017 email noting the original tender capacities and original driver diameter.) Works numbers were 10924-10925 in May 1890.

These passenger Eight-wheelers served several railroads in New England, starting with the CV, but soon transferring to the Ogdensburg & Lake Champlain. In 1901, the Rutland bought both and renumbered them 172-173.

When the New York Central lines briefly gained control of the Rutland in 1905, the two veterans were placed in class C-28 and renumbered 795-796. By that time their tenders held 4,200 gallons (15,897 litres) of water and 9 tons (8.15 tonnes) of coal; they weighed 90,000 lb (40,823 kg) each. Thicker tires increased driver diameters to 69" (1,753 mm).

795 was scrapped in May 1910, but 796 survived long enough to return to the Rutland in 1914.


Class C-X (Locobase 14544)

Data from Dimensions and Classifications of Locomotives of the NYC&HR et al, September 1905, p. 325.

In the 1905 guide, the New York Central assigned the same class ID to several locomotives of different, but relatively ancient, origins. Each variant was different enough that Locobase breaks them out into a series of entries (14544-14546).


Class Saint Lawrence (Locobase 16335)

Data from "Inspection Locomotive", Railroad Gazette, (18 March 1892), p. 207. Works number was 3639 in February 1892.

Doctor Webb's railroad needed an inspection engine, he thought, so he ordered this "elegantly finished" tank locomotive that seated eight persons in the usuall extended car body that stretched from the footplate to just behind the smokebox and stack. Doors on either side of the smokebox improved forward visibility and the occupants could board or debark on steps mounted just ahead of the doors and outboard of the front truck.

The locomotive also was expected to pull two sleeping cars "at usual speed".

Almost immediately, the Adirondack was taken over by the Central Vermont, which renumbered the engine with 109. In 1896, CV's shops detached the coal bunker and fitted a tender.

The now 4-4-0 remained on the CV until it was scrapped in August 1928.

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class1060 / C-X324/C-28C-XSaint Lawrence
Locobase ID14,546 14,542 14,544 16,335
RailroadCentral VermontCentral VermontCentral VermontAdirondack & St Lawrence (CV)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class2211
Road Numbers1060-1061324, 326/172-173/795-796105899/109
GaugeStdStdStdStd
Number Built2211
BuilderSchenectadyBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoCVSchenectady
Year1869189018731892
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)8 / 2.44 8.25 / 2.518 / 2.44 7.50 / 2.29
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)21.75 / 6.6322.08 / 6.7322.17 / 6.7631.92 / 9.73
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.37 0.37 0.36 0.23
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)41.67 / 12.7045.83 / 13.9745 / 13.7231.92 / 9.73
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)49,000 / 22,22655,000 / 24,94845,400 / 20,59356,700 / 25,719
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)77,000 / 34,92787,900 / 39,87172,500 / 32,885134,400 / 60,963
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)60,500 / 27,44263,900 / 28,985
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)137,500 / 62,369136,400 / 61,870
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)2600 / 9.853500 / 13.263000 / 11.362300 / 8.71
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)6 / 5.509 / 8.208 / 7.304 / 3.60
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)41 / 20.5046 / 2338 / 1947 / 23.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)69 / 175368 / 172768 / 172760 / 1524
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)140 / 9.70145 / 10140 / 9.70160 / 11
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)16" x 24" / 406x61017" x 24" / 432x61016" x 24" / 406x61016" x 22" / 406x559
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)10,596 / 4806.2712,572 / 5702.5710,752 / 4877.0312,766 / 5790.57
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.62 4.37 4.22 4.44
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)101 / 9.38123 / 11.43108 / 10.0391.77 / 8.53
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)15.81 / 1.4715.69 / 1.4616.04 / 1.4914.38 / 1.34
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1050 / 97.551198 / 111.301003 / 93.18971 / 90.21
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1050 / 97.551198 / 111.301003 / 93.18971 / 90.21
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume188.00190.01179.59189.66
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation2213227522462301
Same as above plus superheater percentage2213227522462301
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area14,14017,83515,12014,683
Power L14483472543844469
Power MT403.40378.79425.77347.53