Chicago & Erie / Erie / Erie & Wyoming Valley / New York & Erie / New York, Lake Erie & Western 4-6-0 "Ten-Wheeler" Locomotives in the USA


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class 1 (Locobase 390)

Data from Erie's 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. See also DeGolyer, Volume 15, p. 28. Works numbers were 9843, 9848-9849, 9858 in March 1889.

These Ten-wheelers bought by the Pennsylvania Coal, followed the 1886 "class" of camelbacks (Locobase 403) with a virtually identical design. There's a minor 8-sq-ft (0.75 sq m) difference in heating surface area and the driving axle journal is 1/2" smaller in diameter. They all were renumbered for the Erie a& Wyoming Valley in 1896 (222-223, 202, 201) and for the Erie in 1901 (978, 970, 962, 961)..

The 1907 diagram book shows 978 as Godd and all alone.


Class 12 (Locobase 12529)

Data from Angus Sinclair, Development of the Locomotive Engine (New York: Angus Sinclair Publishing, 1907), p.266. (Sinclair attributes the 1853 American Railway Journal article from which he derived the information to Zerah Colburn.)

Shows a haystack boiler, straight stack, inclined outside cylinders over closely spaced bogie axles.

Boiler pressure is a Locobase estimate.


Class 33 (Locobase 4894)

Original data from Pictorial History of theLocomotive (1899) reproduced on [] . Amended and supplemented by Angus Sinclair, Development of the Locomotive Engine (New York: Angus Sinclair Publishing, 1907), p.267. (Sinclair attributes the 1853 American Railway Journal article from which he derived the information to Zerah Colburn.)

Shows a haystack boiler, cabbage stack, closely spaced bogie axles.

Boiler pressure is a Locobase estimate.


Class 49 (Locobase 12538)

Data from Angus Sinclair, Development of the Locomotive Engine (New York: Angus Sinclair Publishing, 1907), p.266. (Sinclair attributes the 1853 American Railway Journal article from which he derived the information to Zerah Colburn.) Works numbers were 15-17 in March 1850, 18-19 in June.

Boiler pressure is a Locobase estimate.

The first three locomotives were retired in the early to mid-1860s; the last two were rebuilt at Dunkirk in March 1862.


Class 72 (Locobase 12544)

Data from Angus Sinclair, Development of the Locomotive Engine (New York: Angus Sinclair Publishing, 1907), p.270. (Sinclair attributes the 1853 American Railway Journal article from which he derived the information to Zerah Colburn.). Works numbers were 22 in November 1850, 23 in December, 24-25 in January 1851, 26 in February, 27 in March, 228-29 in April, 30 in May, 31 in June, 32 in August, and 33 in September.

All of these freight Ten-wheelers were rebuilt at the Erie's shops in Dunkirk (9) and Susquehanna (3) in the late 1860s and early 1870s. 71 and 72 received modest updates and experienced a two-ton weight gain. 75-78 and 82-83 were put through more extensive upgrades that added seven-eight short tons to the engine weight. 79-81 had the greatest weight gain, an average of nine tons.

Boiler pressure is a Locobase estimate.


Class 86 (Locobase 12547)

Data from Angus Sinclair, Development of the Locomotive Engine (New York: Angus Sinclair Publishing, 1907), p.269. (Sinclair attributes the 1853 American Railway Journal article from which he derived the information to Zerah Colburn.) Works number was 245 in February 1851.

Boiler pressure is a Locobase estimate.


Class G-10 (Locobase 399)

Data from Erie's 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. See also DeGolyer, Volume 18, p. 243. Works numbers were 13683-13685, 13702-13704 in August 1893.

Six engines that were virtually identical to G-2s, but rode on 68-in drivers.

After a little more than 20 years, the entire class was scrapped in 1914-1915.


Class G-11 (Locobase 400)

Data from Erie's 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. See also DeGolyer, Volume 15, p. 75 and Volume 16, p. 5. Works numbers were 10741, 10758 in March 1890; 10973, 10975-10977, and 10983 in June 1890; 11082, 11084-11086 in July 1890; and 11091 in August 1890.

Twelve engines built one year before very similar G-1s and designated retrospectively. A later rebuild reduced the tube count to 252, which lowered evaporative heating surface area to 1,919 sq ft (178.3 sq m). Also, by the time of the 1907 accounting, adhesion weight had risedn to 112,000 lb (50,802 kg), and engine weight rose to 137,400 lb (62,324 kg).

Most were scrapped in the 'teens, but 766 lasted until November 1922.


Class G-12 (Locobase 401)

Data from Erie's 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange and DeGolyer, Volume 24, p. 70. (Thanks to Chris Hohl for his 14 March 2018 email noting the disparity in driver diameters between the Baldwin specs and the Erie diagrams. See Locobase's discussion below.) Works numbers were 19218-19220, 19229-19232, 19287-19289 in July 1901.

Considerably larger than earlier Erie ten-wheelers, these Cameback Ten-wheelers had

greater tractive power. Their fireboxes were every bit as big as earlier double cabs, but no longer had combustion chambers of any length; the heating surface area comes from the Baldwin specifications. 1907 Erie diagrams recorded a barely different 166 sq ft (15.42 sq m). Tender capacity in the Erie diagram showed 20 short tons (18,182 kg) of coal and its weight came to 149,000 lb (67,585 kg).

Baldwin's specification gives the outside driver diameter of 64" (1,626 mm) and wheel center diameter of 56" (1,422 mm). The difference of 8" (203 mm) between the two diameters is larger than almost all other similar specs, which usually included a 3" or 3 1/2" tire for a 6-7 inch difference. Locobase elected to retain the 62" figure given in the Erie diagrams, thinking that the 64" was simply an error. Although Baldwin's loaded tender weight estimate came to 144,000 lb (65,317 kg), Locobase retained the Erie figure.

At the same time as these were delivered, Baldwin supplied Vauclain compounds to the same design; see Locobase 402.

The G-12s remained in service until all were scrapped in 1927.


Class G-13 (Locobase 402)

Data from Erie's 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. See also DeGolyer, Volume 24, pp. 140+. (Thanks to Chris Hohl for his 14 March 2018 email noting the disparity in driver diameters between the Baldwin specs and the Erie diagrams, as well as the original tender weight estimate.) Works numbers were 19329, 19344-19345, 19369-19374 in August 1901 and 19800-19804 in November 1901.

Fifteen camelback engines built as Vauclain compounds in the same year as the G-12 simples (Locobase 401); they had identical boiler and grate dimensions. Unusually for camelbacks of this vintage, the firebox had no combustion chamber. Each set of one HP and one LP cylinders received its steam through a single 13" (330 mm) piston valve.

As noted in Locobase 401 Baldwin's specification gives the outside driver diameter of 64" (1,626 mm) and wheel center diameter of 56" (1,422 mm). See 401 for the explanation of the difference. Although Baldwin's loaded tender weight estimate came to 144,000 lb (65,317 kg), Locobase retained the Erie figure.

Later rebuilt as simple-expansion engines with 22" x 26" cylinders; see Locobase 405.


Class G-14 (Locobase 403)

Data from Erie's 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. See also DeGolyer, Volume 13, p. 19. Works numbers were 7852, 7854, 7863, 7865 in March 1886; 7872 in April; 8065-8066, 8068, 8070, 8727, 8730, 8732 in August.

These were typical anthracite burners that used the large Wootten-patent firebox and thus were camelback locomotives. Indeed, because the boiler was so small, this design had one of the lowest heating surface/grate area ratios of all -- 15.5. These snub-nosed 4-6-0s had boilers that were short even for the double-cab arrangement. And the diagrams suggests that the firedoors sat on a level with the cab, which must have offered a more-than-usually frightening prospect to the fireboy who straddled the footplate and tender plate to heave birds-eye and bituminous culm in a relatively small Wootten firebox.

They were not retained as long as the other camelbacks, in part because of their greater age and smaller dimensions. The first to go were 209-211 in September 1902 with all but one being scrapped in 1912. 991 (ex-261) was scrapped in April 1917.


Class G-15 (Locobase 422)

Data from Erie's 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. See also DeGolyer, Volume 26, p. 210. Works numbers were 23307, 23313, 23321-23322, 23343, 23364-23366, 23377, 23384-23385, 23394, 23410-23412, 23422-23423, 23445, 23451-23452 in December 1903; 23484-23486, 23494, 23528 in January 1904.

Last ten-wheelers built for the Erie; operated as passenger engines. Like many other engines of that time, they were later rebuilt with piston valves acuated by Walschaerts gear and fitted with superheaters; see Locobase 9240.

They lasted until the 1940s, with the last one retiring in 1951.


Class G-15 - superheated (Locobase 9240)

Data from Westing's Erie Power (1970) and Erie 7-1949-1 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Firebox heating surface area included 2 arch tubes that contributed 13 sq ft.

The Susquehanna shops rebuilt these Ten-wheelers, which were delivered by Baldwin in 1904 (Locobase 422). 11 received Walschaert, 14 Baker valve gear to work their 12" piston valves. Although 970 was taken in hand in 1915, the others were updated in the 1920s with a useful amount of superheat without the sacrifice of too much heating surface. By that time, too, master mechanics realized they could gain even more benefit if they kept the boilers set at the original saturated-steam level (usually 200 psi) rather than dropping the pressure.

All of the engines enjoyed long careers of service before being scrapped in the 1940s and 1950s. The first five (951, 955, 962, 967, 973) were all scrapped in November 1941; the last two (950, 958) went in March 1950.

Three of the the class -- 953, 963, 969 -- were sold to the New York, Susquehanna & Western and were retired from that railroad in September-October 1945.


Class G-16 (Locobase 405)

Data from Erie's 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

These camelbacks were delivered as G-13s (Locobase 402), but later rebuilt to these dimensions. Most of the updates occurred in two batches; 922, 924, 930-932 in 1908 (all G-16s) and 920, 923, 925-929, 933 (G-13s) in 1915. 919's modification came in 1911, and 921 and 928 were upgraded in 1916.

The entire class was sold for scrap in 1927.


Class G-3 (Locobase 393)

Data from 1899 Brooks Catalogue and from Erie's 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. (the 1907 book is used for the firebox heating surface and overall EHS).

35 engines built by Brooks, Cooke, Richmond, and Rogers--all later part of American Locomotive Company (Alco)--and five from Burnham, Williams & Company (Baldwin Locomotive Works).

According to a compilation of Cooke locomotives by B.Rumary 25 Kingscombe, Gurney Slade, Radstock, BA3 4TH, ENGLAND) and supplied to Locobase by Allen Stanley in March 2004, works numbers were 2355-2359 (September 1896); road numbers 780-784. Brooks numbers (also from a Rumary compilation) were 2693-2697; road numbers 770-774. Richmond's 2813-2827 were produced in 1899 and Rogers works numbers were 5135-5139 in September 1896 and 5354-5358 in March 1899.

Baldwin's works numbers ran 15031-15035 in September 1896.

Dimensions, demand factors, and ratios have "modern" proportions. Physically, these were tall engines with beehive steam and sand domes; much greater spacing between second and third axles than between first and second. They retained outside slide valves and an inside valve motion.


Class G-4 (Locobase 394)

Some data from Erie's 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. See also DeGolyer, Volume 18, p. 245. Works numbers were 13868-13869, 13872-13877.

These were Vauclain compounds, a system in which an HP cylinder and an LP cylinder were served by the same 10 1/2" (267 mm) piston valve.

Rebuilt as simple expansion engines from 1904-1905 (and 1907) . They were all scrapped in the 'teens except for 985, which was scrapped in March 1924.


Class G-7 - simpled (Locobase 9232)

Data from Erie's 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Works numbers were 13679-13670 in August 1893.

Rounding out the basic G-6 design (Locobase 9231) from Baldwin in 1893 were these two engines delivered originally as four-cylinder Vauclain compounds. The HP cylinders measured 14 1/2", the LP 25" in diameter. Eleven years later, they were converted to the simple-expansion layout shown in the specifications. In the process, they became marginally more powerful than the G-6s.

Both G-7s were scrapped in March 1924.


Class G-8/G-9 (Locobase 398)

Data from Erie's 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

50 engines built by Susquehanna shops and Baldwin in 1891 and 1896. Note very large grate in this camelback design, used for burning low-calorie coal. Most were simple-expansion, some (possibly only 975) were built as compounds with 14-in high-pressure, 24-in low-pressure cylinder diameters. Compounds worked at 180 psi.


Class O a/G-7 (Locobase 16174)

Data from Westing's Erie Power (1970), Erie 1907 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange, and tables in "The Locomotives of the New York, Lake Erie & Western Railroad", American Engineer & Railroading Journal, Vol LXVIII, No 12 (December 1894), pp. 564-566. Works numbers were 13679-13680 in August 1893.

Two compound engines built to G-6 dimensions are shown in Locobase 397. Not quite ten years later,the pair was rebuilt as hard-worked simples (note demand factors of small boiler and grate) in 1904 and 1905.

The two G-7s were scrapped in March 1924.


Class O a/G-7 (Locobase 397)

Data from DeGolyer, Volume 18, pp. 246-247. (Thanks to Wes Barris of steamlocomotive.com for his 28 June 2018 email reporting the missing metric equivalents to cylinder diameter and stroke.) Works numbers were 13679-13680 in August 1893.

Two Vauclain compound engines built to G-6 dimensions (see Locobase 9231). Compared to earlier Vauclain compounds, each of the two castings in this pair held HP cylinders whose diameter grew to 14 1/2" while the LP cylinder added an inch to reach 25; the associated piston valve diameter grew to 12 1/2" (318 mm).

By 1904, the compounding system had given way to simple expansion; see Locobase 16174.


Class O/G-1 (Locobase 391)

Data from DeGolyer, Volume 15, p. 75 and Volume 16, p. 5. See also Westing's Erie Power (1970) and tables in "The Locomotives of the New York, Lake Erie & Western Railroad", American Engineer & Railroading Journal, Vol LXVIII, No 12 (December 1894), pp. 564-566, and from Erie's 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Baldwin works numbers were 13572-13573, 13583-13584, 13594-13595,13605-13606,13617 in July 1893; 13624, 13631-13632, 13645, 13648, 13660-13661, 13669-13670, 13682-13683 in August.

The Susquehanna Shops built the first twelve of this Ten-wheeler class: two in 1891, three in 1892, and seven in 1893. Baldwin followed with 20 more in 1893-1894.


Class O/G-2, G-4 (Locobase 392)

Data from Westing's Erie Power (1970) and tables in "The Locomotives of the New York, Lake Erie & Western Railroad", American Engineer & Railroading Journal, Vol LXVIII, No 12 (December 1894), pp. 564-566, and from Erie's 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. See also DeGolyer, Volume 18, p. 243. Works numbers were 13865-13866, 13880 in December 1893; 13884-13888 in January 1894.

This class was ordered by the New York, Pennsylvania & Ohio for the NYLE&W and had two sources: Eight engines were built as simple-expansion engines, eight more were delivered as Vauclain compounds (Locobase 394), but later simplified to very similar specifications.


Class O/G-5 (Locobase 395)

Data from Westing's Erie Power (1970) and tables in "The Locomotives of the New York, Lake Erie & Western Railroad", American Engineer & Railroading Journal, Vol LXVIII, No 12 (December 1894), pp. 564-566, and DeGolyer, Volume 16, p. 251. Erie's 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Works numbers were 11812 in April 1891; 11837-11840, 11857, 11878, 11887, 11895, 11915, 11918, 11923 in May 1891; 11928, 11946, 11960, 12000, and 12010 in June 1891; 12021, 12065, and 12091 in July 1891.

Twenty engines built two years before G-2 or G-4. Engines 700-707 were later renumbered as engines 720-727. The data in the Locobase specs comes from the original order. The 1894 article showed three fewer boiler tubes and may in fact represent the locomotives as delivered. Erie's 1907 specifications included 192 tubes, but a very different firebox that yielded 204 sq ft (18.96 sq m) of direct heating surface area. Total evaporative heating surface area was 1,562 sq ft (145.17 sq m).

All but one were scrapped in the 'teens and early 1920s. 720 was sold to the Dayton, Toledo, and Chicago in 1920


Class Oa / G-6 (Locobase 396)

Data from Westing's Erie Power (1970) and tables in December 1894 American Engineer and Railroad Journal (AERJ) and from Erie's 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange; and DeGolyer, Volume 18, pp. 246. Works numbers were 13647, 13650-13651, 13662, 13668, 13672 in August 1893 (road numbered 333, 330, 331, 332, 334, 335).

This Ten-wheeler sextet is described as the Oa class "half deck" in the Erie diagram book. A comparison of the diagrams for the G-5 of two years earlier (Locobase 9230) and this set shows that the structure in the cab extended to the rearmost post in the earlier locomotives but were cut short (by half) in the G-6. Note the small grate area.

733-735 were scrapped in 1915-1916, 731-732 went in 1925, and 730 was sold to Roter Spear in June 1927 for scrap.

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class112334972
Locobase ID390 12,529 4894 12,538 12,544
RailroadErie & Wyoming Valley (ERR)Erie (ERR)Erie (ERR)New York & Erie (ERR)Erie (ERR)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class413612
Road Numbers1, 31-33 / 222-223, 202, 201 /1233-3549-51, 67-6972-83, 136-138
GaugeStd6'6'6'6'
Number Built413612
BuilderBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoRogers, Ketchum & GrosvenorRogers, Ketchum & GrosvenorSwinburne, Smith & CoSwinburne, Smith & Co
Year18891848184818501850
Valve Gear
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)10.83 / 3.30
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)20.81 / 6.34
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.52
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)46.02 / 14.03
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)29,750 / 13,494
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)78,100 / 35,42642,300 / 19,18749,000 / 22,22645,500 / 20,638
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)101,900 / 46,22158,000 / 26,30865,000 / 29,48462,500 / 28,35060,050
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)66,500 / 30,164
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)168,400 / 76,385
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)2800 / 10.61
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT) 6.50 / 5.90
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)43 / 21.5024 / 1227 / 13.5025 / 12.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)56 / 142260 / 152460 / 152460 / 1524
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)130 / 9100 / 6.90100 / 6.90100 / 6.90100 / 6.90
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)18" x 24" / 457x61017" x 20" / 432x50818" x 20" / 457x50817" x 20" / 432x50817" x 20" / 432x508
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)15,344 / 6959.938188 / 3714.029180 / 4163.988188 / 3714.02
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 5.09 5.17 5.34 5.56
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)184 / 17.1067 / 6.2372 / 6.6961.50 / 5.7269.25 / 6.44
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)69 / 6.4115 / 1.3914.75 / 1.3713.88 / 1.2913.50 / 1.25
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1078 / 100.191097 / 101.951251 / 116.261084 / 100.741138 / 105.76
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1078 / 100.191097 / 101.951251 / 116.261084 / 100.741138 / 105.76
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume152.51208.79212.38206.31216.59
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation89701500147513881350
Same as above plus superheater percentage89701500147513881350
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area23,9206700720061506925
Power L13430272527352648
Power MT290.47426.07369.16384.91

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class86G-10G-11G-12G-13
Locobase ID12,547 399 400 401 402
RailroadErie (ERR)New York, Lake Erie & Western (ERR)New York, Lake Erie & Western (ERR)Erie (ERR)Erie (ERR)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class16121015
Road Numbers86360-365/790-795/851-855316-327/760-771909-918919-933
Gauge6'StdStdStdStd
Number Built16121015
BuilderRogers, Ketchum & GrosvenorBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & Co
Year18511893189019011901
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)13.50 / 4.1113.50 / 4.1112 / 3.6612 / 3.66
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)24.17 / 7.3724.17 / 7.3722.83 / 6.9624.08 / 7.34
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.56 0.56 0.53 0.50
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)50.42 / 15.3750.50 / 15.3953.65 / 16.3554.91 / 16.74
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)35,200 / 15,96650,200 / 22,77052,000 / 23,587
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)47,000 / 21,319101,600 / 46,085100,000 / 45,359148,700 / 67,449153,200 / 69,490
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)65,175 / 29,563138,000 / 62,596130,000 / 58,967179,100 / 81,238191,200 / 86,727
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)87,900 / 39,87187,900 / 39,871144,000 / 67,585149,000 / 67,585
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)225,900 / 102,467217,900 / 98,838323,100 / 148,823340,200 / 154,312
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)4500 / 17.054500 / 17.057500 / 28.417500 / 28.41
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)9 / 8.209 / 8.2015 / 18.2015 / 18.20
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)26 / 1356 / 2856 / 2883 / 41.5085 / 42.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)72 / 182968 / 172762 / 157562 / 157562 / 1575
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)100 / 6.90160 / 11160 / 11200 / 13.80200 / 13.80
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)17" x 20" / 432x50820" x 24" / 508x61020" x 24" / 508x61021" x 26" / 533x66015.5" x 28" / 394x711
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)26" x 28" / 660x711
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)6824 / 3095.3219,200 / 8708.9821,058 / 9551.7631,439 / 14260.5127,217 / 12345.44
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 6.89 5.29 4.75 4.73 5.63
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)67.50 / 6.27141 / 13.10167.96 / 15.60162.30 / 15.43166 / 15.43
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)13.50 / 1.2531.20 / 2.9038 / 3.5377.37 / 7.1677 / 7.16
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)991 / 92.101958 / 181.972052 / 190.642320 / 216.642331 / 216.64
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)991 / 92.101958 / 181.972052 / 190.642320 / 216.642331 / 216.64
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume188.61224.37235.14222.59381.19
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation13504992608015,47415,400
Same as above plus superheater percentage13504992608015,47415,400
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area675022,56026,87432,46033,200
Power L130345534547962093797
Power MT426.95360.25362.37276.16163.92

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassG-14G-15G-15 - superheatedG-16G-3
Locobase ID403 422 9240 405 393
RailroadErie & Wyoming Valley (ERR)Erie (ERR)Erie (ERR)Erie (ERR)Erie (ERR)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class1425251540
Road Numbers15-24, 26-30/209-217, 219-220/961-972/988-999950-974950-974919-933770-809
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built142540
BuilderBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoErieErieSeveral
Year18861903192319081896
Valve GearStephensonStephensonBaker or WalschaertStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)10.83 / 3.3013.33 / 4.0613.33 / 4.0612 / 3.6613.50 / 4.11
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)20.81 / 6.3424.67 / 7.5224.67 / 7.5224.08 / 7.3424.17 / 7.37
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.52 0.54 0.54 0.50 0.56
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)46.56 / 14.1953.92 / 16.4353.92 / 16.4354.91 / 16.7450.50 / 15.39
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)29,300 / 13,29047,680 / 21,62747,200 / 21,41049,550 / 22,47640,200 / 18,234
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)82,100 / 37,240132,110 / 59,924135,250 / 61,348141,950 / 64,388108,000 / 48,988
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)99,100 / 44,951176,500 / 80,059185,210 / 84,010180,100 / 81,692144,750 / 65,658
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)65,700 / 29,801137,000 / 62,142137,000 / 62,142149,000 / 67,58593,000 / 42,184
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)164,800 / 74,752313,500 / 142,201322,210 / 146,152329,100 / 149,277237,750 / 107,842
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)2800 / 10.616800 / 25.766800 / 25.767500 / 28.414500 / 17.05
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT) 6.50 / 5.9014 / 12.7014 / 12.7020 / 18.20 8.50 / 7.70
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)46 / 2373 / 36.5075 / 37.5079 / 39.5060 / 30
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)50 / 127069 / 175362 / 157569 / 175362 / 1575
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)130 / 9200 / 13.80200 / 13.80200 / 13.80180 / 12.40
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)18" x 24" / 457x61019" x 26" / 483x66021" x 26" / 533x66022" x 26" / 508x66020" x 26" / 508x660
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)17,185 / 7794.9923,125 / 10489.3431,439 / 14260.5131,004 / 14063.1925,665 / 11641.46
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.78 5.71 4.30 4.58 4.21
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)184 / 17.10155.20 / 14.42166 / 15.43166 / 15.43139 / 12.92
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)69 / 6.4152.20 / 4.8552.30 / 4.8677 / 7.1629.70 / 2.76
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1070 / 99.442505 / 232.721948 / 181.042331 / 216.642083 / 193.59
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)410 / 38.10
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1070 / 99.442505 / 232.722358 / 219.142331 / 216.642083 / 193.59
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume151.37293.60186.90203.77220.33
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation897010,44010,46015,4005346
Same as above plus superheater percentage897010,44012,23815,4005346
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area23,92031,04038,84433,20025,020
Power L13050884512,82563565466
Power MT245.70442.81627.16296.14334.73

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassG-4G-7 - simpledG-8/G-9O a/G-7O a/G-7
Locobase ID394 9232 398 16,174 397
RailroadNew York, Lake Erie & Western (ERR)Chicago & Erie (ERR)New York, Lake Erie & Western (ERR)Chicago & Erie (ERR)Chicago & Erie (ERR)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class825022
Road Numbers374-381/980-987336-337 / 976-977976-977336-337/990-991/976-977
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built8502
BuilderBurnham, Williams & CoErieseveralErieBurnham, Williams & Co
Year18931904189119041893
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)13.50 / 4.1112.83 / 3.9112 / 3.6612.83 / 3.9112.83 / 3.91
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)24.50 / 7.4724.19 / 7.3722.83 / 6.9624.19 / 7.3724.17 / 7.37
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.55 0.53 0.53 0.53 0.53
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)50 / 15.2450.85 / 15.5051.87 / 15.8150.85 / 15.5050.85 / 15.50
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)43,400 / 19,68637,650 / 17,07842,200 / 19,14237,650 / 17,078
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)113,650 / 51,551109,800 / 49,805118,500 / 53,751109,800 / 49,80596,000 / 43,545
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)149,700 / 67,903133,600 / 60,600144,500 / 65,544138,600 / 62,868
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)77,000 / 34,92777,000 / 34,92787,900 / 39,87177,000 / 34,92777,000 / 34,927
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)226,700 / 102,830210,600 / 95,527232,400 / 105,415215,600 / 97,795
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)3600 / 13.643600 / 13.644500 / 17.053600 / 13.643600 / 13.64
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)8 / 7.308 / 7.309 / 8.20 8.90 / 8.10 8.90 / 8.10
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)63 / 31.5061 / 30.5066 / 3361 / 30.5053 / 26.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)62 / 157562 / 157562 / 157568 / 172768 / 1727
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)180 / 12.40160 / 11175 / 12.10180 / 12.40180 / 12.40
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)14" x 24" / 356x61020" x 24" / 508x61021" x 26" / 533x66020" x 24" / 508x61014.5" x 24" / 368x610
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)24" x 24" / 610x61025" x 24" / 635x610
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)17,322 / 7857.1421,058 / 9551.7627,509 / 12477.8921,600 / 9797.6116,991 / 7707.00
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 6.56 5.21 4.31 5.08 5.65
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)137.68 / 12.79148 / 13.75187 / 17.38148 / 13.75148.80 / 13.82
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)31 / 2.8824 / 2.2377 / 7.1624 / 2.2324 / 2.23
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1939 / 180.141654 / 153.722140 / 198.881654 / 153.721646 / 152.92
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1939 / 180.141654 / 153.722140 / 198.881654 / 153.721646 / 152.92
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume453.46189.53205.32189.53358.84
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation5580384013,47543204320
Same as above plus superheater percentage5580384013,47543204320
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area24,78223,68032,72526,64026,784
Power L138894536533555963576
Power MT226.32273.23297.76337.08246.37

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassO/G-1O/G-2, G-4O/G-5Oa / G-6
Locobase ID391 392 395 396
RailroadNew York, Lake Erie & Western (ERR)New York, Lake Erie & Western (ERR)Chicago & Erie (ERR)Chicago & Erie (ERR)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class4116206
Road Numbers329-360366-373/750-757, 980-987310-329/708-719, 700-707330-335/730-735
GaugeStdStdStdStd
Number Built418206
BuilderSeveralBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & Co
Year1889189318911893
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)13.50 / 4.1113.50 / 4.1112.83 / 3.9112.83 / 3.91
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)24.17 / 7.3723.83 / 7.2623.50 / 7.1623.52 / 7.17
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.56 0.57 0.55 0.55
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)50.50 / 15.3949.33 / 15.0449 / 14.9450.19 / 15.30
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)38,300 / 17,37337,300 / 16,91934,600 / 15,69437,250 / 16,896
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)111,000 / 50,349108,300 / 49,12499,800 / 45,269108,300 / 49,124
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)144,000 / 65,317138,000 / 62,596122,500 / 55,565131,800 / 59,784
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)86,800 / 39,37277,000 / 34,92777,000 / 34,92777,000 / 34,927
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)230,800 / 104,689215,000 / 97,523199,500 / 90,492208,800 / 94,711
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)4500 / 17.053600 / 13.643600 / 13.643600 / 13.64
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)9 / 8.20 8.90 / 8.10 8.90 / 8.10 8.90 / 8.10
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)62 / 3160 / 3055 / 27.5060 / 30
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)68 / 172762 / 157562 / 157562 / 1575
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)160 / 11160 / 11145 / 10160 / 11
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)20" x 24" / 508x61020" x 24" / 508x61019" x 24" / 483x61019" x 24" / 483x610
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)19,200 / 8708.9821,058 / 9551.7617,223 / 7812.2319,005 / 8620.53
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 5.78 5.14 5.79 5.70
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)167.96 / 15.60137.68 / 12.79154 / 14.31148.80 / 13.75
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)39 / 3.6231 / 2.8828 / 2.6024 / 2.23
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)2052 / 190.641939 / 180.141543 / 143.351646 / 153.72
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)2052 / 190.641939 / 180.141543 / 143.351646 / 153.72
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume235.14222.19195.92208.99
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation6240496040603840
Same as above plus superheater percentage6240496040603840
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area26,87422,02922,33023,808
Power L16009497844005017
Power MT358.04304.01291.59306.39

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