Erie & Wyoming Valley / New York, Lake Erie & Western 2-6-0 "Mogul" Locomotives of the USA


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class 11/206/F-9 (Locobase 6699)

Data from Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works numbers were 503-505, 507 in April 1886.

Camelback Moguls from the E & WV. Note the small boiler and enormous firebox. Identical to the F-8s (Locobase 6698) in virtually every respect.


Class D / F-1 (Locobase 364)

Data from Westing's Erie Power (1970) and tables in "The Locomotives of the New York, Lake Erie & Western Railroad", American Engineer & Railroading Journal, Vol LXVIII, No 12 (December 1894), pp. 564-566). Locobase includes in this entry only the seven engines built in the Susquehanna shops in 1881-1882 and fourteen Brooks locomotives. The latter's works numbers were 844-850, 853, 856-857 in January 1883 and 952-955 in July.

Other locomotives with 18" x 24" cylinders and 56" drivers were assigned F-1 class IDs when the Erie reorganized in 1895.


Class E / F-2 (Locobase 371)

Data from Westing's Erie Power (1970) and tables in "The Locomotives of the New York, Lake Erie & Western Railroad", American Engineer & Railroading Journal, Vol LXVIII, No 12 (December 1894), pp. 564-566. Data from Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book (supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection) says the firebox heating surface was 144 sq ft.

Built at the Susquehanna Shops between 1882 and 1885. Seem to have been higher-drivered versions of the F-1 with a larger boiler. Certainly, 68" drivers on a Mogul were uncommon because the Bissel truck used on most 2-6-0s simply didn't track well enough to be run at higher speeds. A note accompanying the specifications in the AERJ article says that this class pulled heavy passenger trains "carrying commuters and for milk service."


Class F-10 - original (Locobase 12115)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Volume 19, p. 127. See also "Peculiar Locomotives," Locomotive Engineers' Monthly Journal, Vol 28, No 11 (November 1894), pp. 1034 and "Three-Cylinder Simple Locomotives; Erie & Wyoming Valley RR," Engineering News, Volume XXXIII, No 6 (2 February 1895), pp. 92-94. Works numbers were 14067, 14072-14073 in August 1894.

Cited by Paul T. Warner (RLHS Bulletin #58) as the first of the second wave of three-cylinder, this small class of camelback moguls had the wide firebox for burning anthracite coal. The cylinders measured 17" in diameter by 24" stroke. Two of the three straddled the engine's right frame rail (one inside, one outside). The usual enormous grate heated a firebox whose heating surface area included 46 sq ft (4.27 sq m) in the combustion chamber.

Designed by the E & WV's president John B Smith (who had died before the class entered service), the power dimensions reflected his experience with the winding engines used to haul cars up the three planes inclined at 10 1/2 degrees. Against such an insistent pull of gravity, he observed that a three-cylinder engine seemed stronger and smoother than an equivalent two-cylinder set.

Trials with three small homebuilt locomotives produced in 1881 confirmed his opinion, but it was only in 1892 that he built two more Consolidations and bought the three Moguls shown here. Like many other designers who added one or two cylinders to the usual pair, Smith wanted to apply a similar amount of power at a more even rate rather than increasing the amount of effort. The EN report summarizes the hoped-for effects of "reducing the tendency to slip the drving wheels and reducing the breaking of car couplings of heavy coal trains on steep grades."

EN's report recount the details of the trials and noted that some of the advantages cited by advocates, such as a lighter draft over the fire that avoided the "sharp, tearing action" of a normal setup working in long cutoff, could also mean less heat in the firebox and thus less evaporative power. " Ambiguous evidence suggested that although the 35's steam entrained more water (which would reduce its temperature and power), the engine appeared to steam well within the confined space allowed by the Wotten design. Raising the dome as high above the crown sheet as possible while dropping the crown sheet at least 3" would " insure a much better quality of steam."

The discussion continued for several paragraphs and underscored some surprising, and adverse, tradeoffs between the potential for fuel savings at limited cutoff, the power demands that required long cutoffs, space considerations, valve designs, and changes in engineer technique.

The E&WV, which began service as a narrow-gauge railway, joined the Erie as the Wyoming Division in 1901.)

The trio was rebuilt with two 21" x 24" cylinders; see Locobase 4098.


Class F-10 - rebuilt (Locobase 4098)

The data in the specifications, taken from Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection, represents the rebuilds.

As noted in Locobase 12115, the camelback Moguls in this class originally used three 17" cylinders for power when they first appeared on predecessor road Erie & Wyoming.= Valley. Some time after they entered service, most likely after the Erie took over the E & WV in 1901, the shops removed all three cylinders and motions and replaced the two outer ones with 21" cylinders.

The 1907 diagram book shows a total heating surface of 1,806 sq ft, which is not correct given the number and length of the tubes. Instead, it appears that the only change made in the locomotives was the cylinder setup.

742 was scrapped first in March 1919 followed by 743 (September) and 741 (December 1921).


Class F-3 (Locobase 372)

Data from Erie's 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works numbers were 8082 and 8087 in August 1886

When introduced in 1886 as the only members of the N class, these two Moguls had the largest boilers for their arrangement on the Erie. As noted in Locobase 11851, however, these had small and short 1 1/2" tubes

Obviously, the original fit shown in the specs was insufficient, and the Erie mounted new 64"-diameter boilers with 431 tubes of the same 1 1/2" diameter (why didn't they just increase the diameter of each tube?) to supply enough heating surface for the sizable grate.

They were scrapped in August 1921 for 745 and October 1925 for 746.


Class F-4 (Locobase 373)

Data from Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Conventionally laid out Mogul with small drivers and a relatively low boiler pressure.


Class F-5 (Locobase 374)

Data from Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Variants of the F-1 (Locobase 364) built at the Susquehanna Shops between 1881 and 1883. Power dimensions are identical except for the boiler pressure and the driver diameter.


Class F-6 (Locobase 375)

Data from Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

3 engines built in the Susquehanna Shops in 1881-1882. Variants of the F-5 with higher drivers.


Class F-7 (Locobase 376)

3 engines (582, 584, 585) that were lower-driver variants of the F-2s. Built at the Susquehanna Shops.Data from Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.


Class N (Locobase 11851)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 13, p. 83. See also"Passenger Engine with Wootten Firebox", Locomotive Engineer's Monthly Journal, Volume 21, No 2 (February 1887), p. 115-116. Works numbers were 8082 and 8087 in August 1886

Ns had the largest boilers in an Erie Mogul type, a fitting achievement for these sizable Camelbacks. Unlike most of the other engines, however, these had small and short 1 1/2" tubes. They also had surprisingly tall drivers for the 2-6-0 layout.

At some later date, the Erie mounted a new, larger boiler that substantially changed the heating surface area. See Locobase 372 for the resulting F-3.


Class Saranac/204/F-8 (Locobase 6698)

Data from Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works numbers were 498 in November 1884 and 499 in December 1884.

Camelbacks from the E & WV. Note the small boiler and oversized Wootten firebox. Their most unusual features were the three cylinders laid out under the smokebox. Two lay to the right of the centerline (looking from above) and one to the left.

Four more came in 1886 and would be designated F-9 by the Erie; see Locobase 6699..

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class11/206/F-9D / F-1E / F-2F-10 - originalF-10 - rebuilt
Locobase ID6699 364 371 12,115 4098
RailroadErie & Wyoming Valley (ERR)New York, Lake Erie & Western (ERR)New York, Lake Erie & Western (ERR)Erie & Wyoming Valley (ERR)Erie & Wyoming Valley (ERR)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-6-02-6-02-6-02-6-02-6-0
Number in Class421833
Road Numbers11-13, 20/206- 208, 214/738-74035-37741-743
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built42183
BuilderDicksonseveralErieBurnham, Williams & CoErie
Year18861881188218941901
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft)14.1715151414.17
Engine Wheelbase (ft)21.6722.6022.7121.5821.58
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.65 0.66 0.66 0.65 0.66
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)46.2147.0247.0446.7946.79
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)31,25026,50032,00042,500
Weight on Drivers (lbs)85,30075,30087,900104,000116,400
Engine Weight (lbs)98,30088,400103,300120,000133,750
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)57,10077,00077,00090,000108,350
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)155,400165,400180,300210,000242,100
Tender Water Capacity (gals)24003600350040006000
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons) 5.508 8.9010.957
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)4742495865
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)5656685757
Boiler Pressure (psi)140130140150160
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)18" x 24" (3)18" x 24"18" x 24"17" x 24" (3)21" x 24"
Tractive Effort (lbs)24,78615,34413,60823,27225,253
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.44 4.91 6.46 4.47 4.61
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)183120152.50211.30193
Grate Area (sq ft)6827277676
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)10871149144916001600
Superheating Surface (sq ft)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)10871149144916001600
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume102.52162.55204.99169.18166.30
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation95203510378011,40012,160
Same as above plus superheater percentage95203510378011,40012,160
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area25,62015,60021,35031,69530,880
Power L124673002496440034052
Power MT191.28263.68373.51254.57230.24

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassF-3F-4F-5F-6F-7
Locobase ID372 373 374 375 376
RailroadNew York, Lake Erie & Western (ERR)New York, Lake Erie & Western (ERR)New York, Lake Erie & Western (ERR)New York, Lake Erie & Western (ERR)New York, Lake Erie & Western (ERR)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-6-02-6-02-6-02-6-02-6-0
Number in Class28633
Road Numbers317-318/745-746700-707390-391, 397, 404-405, 149/13-14, 18, 244, 24, 38/
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built8633
BuilderErieBrooksErieErieErie
Year1888188118811882
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft)1515.50151515
Engine Wheelbase (ft)22.7125.9022.7222.7122.54
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.66 0.60 0.66 0.66 0.67
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)48.3746.4847.0447.0447.04
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)43,00032,30031,40032,70032,100
Weight on Drivers (lbs)125,33090,00087,20091,30092,800
Engine Weight (lbs)142,840103,000103,800105,800109,000
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)87,90063,00077,00077,00077,000
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)230,740166,000180,800182,800186,000
Tender Water Capacity (gals)45003000360036003600
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons)99888
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)7050485152
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)6856626862
Boiler Pressure (psi)180140120130140
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)20" x 26"19" x 24"18" x 24"18" x 24"18" x 24"
Tractive Effort (lbs)23,40018,41112,79312,63614,925
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 5.36 4.89 6.82 7.23 6.22
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)174124127127144
Grate Area (sq ft)7717172727
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)18621394115711571450
Superheating Surface (sq ft)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)18621394115711571450
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume196.96177.00163.68163.68205.13
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation13,8602380204035103780
Same as above plus superheater percentage13,8602380204035103780
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area31,32017,36015,24016,51020,160
Power L158953341314437354441
Power MT311.09245.52238.46270.57316.51

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassNSaranac/204/F-8
Locobase ID11,851 6698
RailroadNew York, Lake Erie & Western (ERR)Erie & Wyoming Valley (ERR)
CountryUSAUSA
Whyte2-6-02-6-0
Number in Class22
Road Numbers136-1379-10/204-205/736-737
GaugeStdStd
Number Built22
BuilderBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoDickson
Year18861884
Valve GearStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft)1514.17
Engine Wheelbase (ft)22.6221.67
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.66 0.65
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)46.21
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)31,250
Weight on Drivers (lbs)95,30090,000
Engine Weight (lbs)114,000103,000
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)58,40057,100
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)172,400160,100
Tender Water Capacity (gals)32002400
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons) 5.50
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)5350
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)6856
Boiler Pressure (psi)140140
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)20" x 26"18" x 24" (3)
Tractive Effort (lbs)18,20024,786
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 5.24 3.63
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)181183
Grate Area (sq ft)7768
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)14591087
Superheating Surface (sq ft)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)14591087
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume154.33102.52
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation10,7809520
Same as above plus superheater percentage10,7809520
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area25,34025,620
Power L139682467
Power MT275.38181.29

Reference


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