Waccamaw Lumber Company / Walterboro Lumber Company / Waterman Lumber Co. / Waterman Lumber Company / West Lumber Company / Western Lumber Company / Whiteville Lumber Company / Wilson Lumber Company 2-6-2 "Prairie" Locomotives of the USA


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class 1 (Locobase 5089)

Data from Baldwin builder's card reproduced on http://www.nps.gov/history/history/online_books/steamtown/shs2d.htm, last accessed 6 February 2010. See also DeGolyer, Vol 71, pp. 422+. Works numbers were 33510 in June 1909, 38033 in July 1912, 55300 in March 1922, and 55735 in October.

Marshall, Texas lumber company bought these smallish standard-gauge Prairies. The profile looks turn-of-the-century, but in fact the first was delivered in June 1909, followed a little more than 3 years later by Waterman #3. A full decade later, a third little Prairie --#4-- came on the property, followed a few months later by the #2 of the by-now Waterman Fouke-Lumber Co. The 4 burned oil and trailed a tender carrying 1,300 US gallons (4,921 litres) of heavy crude.

Waterman sold the #2 to the Hutchinson Moore Lumber in January 1926. The other three were sold to Frost Lumber Industries in 1929.

Tonnage ratings were as follows:

Short tons grade

1,550 level

720 1/2%

435 1%

220 2%

135 3%

85 4%

55 5%

35 6%

(Somehow, the image of this Prairie struggling up a 6% grade with 1 or 2 cars in the knuckle strikes Locobase as implausible.)


Class 10 (Locobase 15483)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Vol 80, pp. 151+. See also Leland M Roth, "Company Towns in the Western United States", in John S Garner (ed), The Company Town : Architecture and Society in the Early Industrial Age (New York: Oxford University Press, 1992), pp. 173-206, esp. 194-195.Works number was 60389 in February 1928.

Baldwin's logging Prairie saddle-tank design was a stock item, as the identical values for the dimensions and weights of several such engines suggest. Like the others, the superheated 10 used 9 1/2" (241 mm) piston valves to admit steam to the cylinders. Its duty for this Westfir, Ore based timber harvester included impressive 7% grades.

George Kelly built Westfir's first mill in 1923 and soon added a larger facility in 1925. The company struggled from the start as construction costs were higher than estimated and revenues were pulled inexorably downward by the start of the Great Depression. Reorganization in 1935 was followed by a takeover by the Edward Hines Lumber Company in 1944.


Class 102 (Locobase 14292)

Data from DeGolyer Library, Volume 52, p. 324. Works number was 43339 in May 1916.

Kneeland-West was based in Lugerville, Wisc on the banks of the Flambeau River. It was succeeded by West Lumber. As such, the company bought the 102, a logging Prairie that ran on "rough, undulating track" that weighed 60 lb/yard (30 kg/metre), scaled 6% grades, and bent around 35 degree curves (166 foot/50.6 metre radii).

When the Lugerville complex closed and scrapped, the rails were torn up as well and the 102 was sold to the Dells & Nofrtheastern, which was the last common carrier to be incorporated in Wisconsin.


Class 2 (Locobase 13819)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Volume 52, p. 316. Works number was 41927 in February 1915.

Wilson Lumber Company was headquartered in Isola, Miss.


Class 2 (Locobase 14280)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist Universitym Volume 52, p. 292+. Works number was 42659 in November 1915.

The WLC was based in its namesake town in South Carolina. It locomotive rebuilder/reseller Birmingham Rail & Locomotive. When BR&L sold the engine to the F B Williams Cypress Company in April 1924, it joined the 30, an identically designed locomotive shown in Locobase 14061.

Williams Cypress later sold the 30 to the Orange Grove Plantation and Orange Grove sold it to Sterling Sugar, which operated the little Mogul for years (possibly until 1948).


Class 204 (Locobase 13828)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Volume 39, p. 71. Works number was 37522 in February 1912.

56-lb/yard (28-kg/metre) rail called for light-footed logging engines and the Prairie wheel arrangement proved well-suited to the task. The 204 fell in the middle of the range for such locomotives. The Myrtestown, La company later transferred the 204 to the De Queen & Eastern, where it joined the 202 (a Prairie of identical dimensions) and the earlier 201.

The 202's specs stated that the centerline of the boiler above the rail would 9" higher than that of the 201 or 7 ft 2 inches and the bottom of the mud ring would be raised 6" to allow for a deeper ash pan that would prevent grates burning.


Class 3 (Locobase 13447)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 39, p. 59. See Locobase 13446 for brief history of the WLC. Works number was 36773 in July 1911.

The railway was built on the standard gauge with light rail of 45 lb/yard (22.5 kg/metre) and this logging Prairie suited the logging roads well. Yet a "Hereafter" note in the specifications illustrates the kind of tweaks such engines might require once they've acquired a little road dust. Dated 12 May 1912 by "RS McG" and based on C G Hesman's report of 29 April, the advice reads:

"Back Engine Truck bolster to have holes for centre pin to be bored straight for 2 1/2" and then tapered to 8" diam to give play for center pin when engine rolls from side to side."

A reader picturing this locomotive trundling along the lightly laid logging railroad will easily imagine that rolling side to side must have been a near-constant companion to forward motion.


Class 3 / 1 (Locobase 13448)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 52, p. 290 and Vol 73, pp. 425+. See Locobase 13446 for brief history of the WLC. Works number was 42170 in July 1915 and 58267 in March 1925.

Gene Connelly's list of Baldwin production indicates that this locomotive was constructed for the 3-foot gauge on the Waccamaw Land & Lumber Company. Perhaps this was the original intent, but the Baldwin specs sheet shows the final destination of the small logging Prairie as the WLC as their #1.


Class 5 (Locobase 14046)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Volume 45, p. 38. Works number was 40960 in December 1913.

This wood-burning logging Prairie was delivered to Whiteville, NC. The specs called for a deep firebox for wood and a Radley & Hunter cabbage stack. Whiteville later merged with nearby Enterprise Lumber in Goldsboro and the 5 joined the ELC's#1, which had been built to the same design.

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class11010222
Locobase ID5089 15483 14292 13819 14280
RailroadWaterman Lumber Co.Western Lumber CompanyWest Lumber CompanyWilson Lumber CompanyWalterboro Lumber Company
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-6-22-6-2ST2-6-22-6-22-6-2
Number in Class31111
Road Numbers1, 3, 4, 21010222
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built31111
BuilderBaldwinBaldwinBaldwinBaldwinBaldwin
Year19091928191419151915
Valve GearWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase 9.17' 9.50'10' 9.17'8'
Engine Wheelbase23.75'25.33'25.25'23.75'21.33'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.39 0.38 0.40 0.39 0.38
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)46.71'25.33'48.29'46.62'43.08'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers61000 lbs105000 lbs76550 lbs60000 lbs45000 lbs
Engine Weight83500 lbs134500 lbs100700 lbs81000 lbs62000 lbs
Tender Light Weight68500 lbs80000 lbs60000 lbs50500 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight152000 lbs134500 lbs180700 lbs141000 lbs112500 lbs
Tender Water Capacity3000 gals1600 gals4000 gals3000 gals2500 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)4 tons750 gals6 tons6 tons5 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)34 lb/yard58 lb/yard43 lb/yard33 lb/yard25 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter46"44"44"46"36"
Boiler Pressure180 psi165 psi160 psi180 psi180 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)15" x 20"17" x 24"16" x 24"15" x 20"12" x 18"
Tractive Effort14967 lbs22109 lbs18991 lbs14967 lbs11016 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.08 4.75 4.03 4.01 4.08
Heating Ability
Firebox Area82 sq. ft74 sq. ft94 sq. ft82.20 sq. ft60 sq. ft
Grate Area14 sq. ft16.30 sq. ft14 sq. ft14.10 sq. ft13.30 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface991 sq. ft804 sq. ft1609 sq. ft991 sq. ft551 sq. ft
Superheating Surface188 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface991 sq. ft992 sq. ft1609 sq. ft991 sq. ft551 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume242.26127.52288.09242.26233.85
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation25202690224025382394
Same as above plus superheater percentage25203201224025382394
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area1476014530150401479610800
Power L147265500436847303901
Power MT512.41346.44377.39521.39573.35

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class20433 / 15
Locobase ID13828 13447 13448 14046
RailroadWaterman Lumber CompanyWaccamaw Lumber CompanyWaccamaw Lumber CompanyWhiteville Lumber Company
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-6-22-6-22-6-22-6-2
Number in Class1111
Road Numbers20433 / 15
GaugeStdStdStdStd
Number Built1111
BuilderBaldwinBaldwinBaldwinBaldwin
Year1912191119151913
Valve GearWalschaertStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase10'8'8'8'
Engine Wheelbase26'22.75'22.75'22.75'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.38 0.35 0.35 0.35
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)47.25'46.08'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers77000 lbs56000 lbs40000 lbs57000 lbs
Engine Weight103000 lbs76000 lbs54000 lbs78100 lbs
Tender Light Weight60000 lbs44000 lbs44000 lbs60000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight163000 lbs120000 lbs98000 lbs138100 lbs
Tender Water Capacity3000 gals2000 gals2000 gals3000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)5 tons3.5 tons5 tons tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)43 lb/yard31 lb/yard22 lb/yard32 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter46"42"36"44"
Boiler Pressure180 psi170 psi180 psi180 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)16" x 24"13" x 22"12" x 16"13" x 22"
Tractive Effort20435 lbs12792 lbs9792 lbs12929 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.77 4.38 4.08 4.41
Heating Ability
Firebox Area112 sq. ft74 sq. ft58 sq. ft74 sq. ft
Grate Area16.80 sq. ft13.30 sq. ft14 sq. ft13.30 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1366 sq. ft767 sq. ft438 sq. ft767 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface1366 sq. ft767 sq. ft438 sq. ft767 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume244.58226.94209.13226.94
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation3024226125202394
Same as above plus superheater percentage3024226125202394
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area20160125801044013320
Power L14759400337544441
Power MT408.77472.77620.71515.30


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