Los Angeles & Salt Lake / Oregon Short Lines / Oregon Washington RR&N / Union Pacific / Utah Railway 2-10-2 "Santafe" Locomotives of the USA

The Union Pacific Railroad and its subsidiary roads bought a total of 144 "Santa Fe" type locomotives. Like the Southern Pacific the UP was reluctant to actually call them "Santa Fe" and chose the designation of TTT (Two-Ten-Two). All 144 of these "Two-Ten-Twos" had the same cylinder and driver dimensions as well as the same boiler pressure. Ninety went to the parent road UP (Baldwin built 43, Lima built 37 and ALCO-Brooks built10), Eight went to the Oregon Short Line Railroad (ALCO-Brooks built all 8), Fifteen went to the Oregon-Washington Railroad & Navigation (Baldwin built all 15) and thirty-one went to the Los Angeles & Salt Lake City Railroad (Baldwin built all 31). There was trading of these locomotives among the various subsidiaries at which time they were assigned new numbers. So at one time or another here is the head count for each of the roads. UP had 90 numbered 5000 through 5089, OSL had19 numbered 5300 through 5318, OWR&N had 14 numbered 5400 through 5414 and the LA-SL had a total of 36 numbered 3800 through 3805 and 5500 through 5529.

The first 2-10-2s to arrive on the Union Pacific Railroad were ten built by the Baldwin Locomotive Works and delivered in 1917. This group was designated as Class TTT-1 and was assigned road numbers 5000 through 5009. During 1918, the Los Angeles-Salt Lake Railroad received six very similar Baldwin-built 2-10-2s. The LA-SL: locomotives were designated as Class TTT-2 and carried road numbers 3800 through 3805. The TTT-1s were coal fired and the TTT-2s were oil-fired. All of these first sixteen 2-10-2s had 63" diameter drivers, 29.5" x 30" cylinders, a 200 psi boiler pressure and they exerted 70,450 pounds of tractive effort. These dimensions and boiler pressure would be repeated on the other 128 Two-Ten-Twos the UP and its subsidiaries would buy. These first two groups were built with 32 sq ft of arch tubes contributing to the firebox heating surface. About half were fitted with Elesco feedwater heaters. The other half had Coffin type which added about 700 lb to the adhesion weight.

In 1918, numbers 3800 through 3805 were converted to be coal fired and transferred to the OSL and became numbers 5300 through 5305 on the railroad. In 1928, number 5007 was converted to be oil fired and was transferred to the LA&SL and became number 5525 on that railroad.

In 1919, the UP received five more TTTs and another 25 came in 1920. The locomotives delivered in 1919 were designated as class TTT-3 and given road numbers 5010 through 5014 and the group received in 1920 were designated as Class TTT-4 and assigned road numbers 5015 through 5039. Numbers 5010-5013 were converted to oil-fired and transferred to LA&SL in 1928 and became LA&SL numbers 5526-5529 and were assigned to helper service on Cajon Pass in California. Numbers 5023, 5024, 5026, 5035 and 5037 were delivered as oil-fired locomotives, the balance were coal-fired and equipped with Street stokers which were later converted to Duplex stokers.

Starting in December 1922 and by March 1923 the OWR&N received fifteen of the 2-10-2s from Baldwin. This group was designated as Class TTT-5 and assigned road numbers 5400 through 5414. Numbers 5408, 5409, and 5411-5413 were transferred to OSL in 1928 and became numbers 5314-5318.on that railroad. In 1931, the OSL returned number 5014 to the OWR&N converted.5315, 5316 & 5317 to be oil-fired.

In 1923 the UP received fifty new 2-10-2 locomotives which were classified as Class TTT-6. Ten were built by ALCO-Brooks and assigned road numbers 5040 through 5049, three were built by Baldwin and given road numbers 5050 through 5052 and the other thirty-seven were built by the Lima Locomotive Works. These locomotives were similar to the other classes of TTTs except the firebox was completely changed. The grate area stayed the same, but in place of 32 sq ft of arch tubes, the new firebox had 118 sq ft of Nicholson thermic syphons. The change increased the direct heating surface by 20%.and were considerably more powerful locomotives.

Also in 1923, the OSL took delivery of eight Class TTT-6 Two-Ten-Twos built by ALCO-Brooks. They were given road numbers 5306 through 5313,

A final group of Class TTT-6 2-10-2s built by Baldwin were delivered to the LA-SL and given road numbers 5500 through 5514 in 1923. In 1924 the LA-SL received ten more Two-Ten-Twos also built by Baldwin. These locomotives were designated as Class TTT-7 and were assigned road numbers 5515 through 5524. There is one surviving UP 2-10-2 "Santa Fe" type locomotives. It is LA&SL Road Class TTT-6, Number 5511. It is in storage at the UP Engine House in Cheyenne, WY.


Roster by Richard Duley

ClassQty.Road NumbersRoadYear BuiltBuilderNotes
TTT-1105000-5009UP1917Baldwin1
TTT-2 63800-3805LA&SL1918Baldwin2
TTT-3 55010-5014UP1919Baldwin3
TTT-4255015-5039UP1920Baldwin4
TTT-5155400-5414OWR&N1922-1923Baldwin5
TTT-6105040-5049UP1923ALCO6
TTT-6 35050-5052UP1923Baldwin7
TTT-6375053-5089UP1923Lima8
TTT-6 85306-5313 OSL1923ALCO9
TTT-6155500-5514LA&SL1923Baldwin10
TTT-7105515-5524LA&SL1924Baldwin 11
Notes:
  1. Number 5007 was converted to oil-fired and transferred to LA&SL in 1928 and became LA&SL number 5525 and was dropped from the roster in 1955. The other nine were retired as follows: number 5000 in 1948, number 5001 in 1949, number 5003 in 1950, number 5004 in 1952, number 5005 in 1954, numbers 5002, 5006 & 5009 in 1955 and number 5008 in 1956.
  2. Numbers 3800-3805 were converted to coal-fired and transferred to OSL in 1918 and became OSL numbers 5300-5305. They were retired as follows: number 5305 in 1952, number 5302 in 1954, numbers 5300 & 5303 in 1955, number 5304 in 1956 and number 5301 in 1957.
  3. Numbers 5010-5013 were converted to oil-fired and transferred to LA&SL in 1928 and became LA&SL numbers 5526-5529 and were assigned to helper service on Cajon Pass in California. UP number 5014 was retired in 1957 and assigned to snow protection service at Pocatello, Idaho. The LA&SL locomotives were retired as follows: numbers 5526 & 5527 in 1954, number 5528 in 1955 and number 5529 in 1956.
  4. Numbers 5023, 5024, 5026, 5035 and 5037 were delivered as oil-fired locomotives, the balance were coal-fired and equipped with Street stokers which were later converted to Duplex stokers. Numbers 5015-5039 were retired as follows: numbers 5017 & 5026 in 1952, number 5015 in 1953, numbers 5016, 5018, 5019, 5021, 5022, 5023, 5025, 5027, 5029, 5031, 5032 & 5038 in 1954, number 5036 in 1955, numbers 5020, 5024, 5028, 5030, 5033, 5034 & 5035 in 1956, number 5037 in 1957.
  5. Numbers 5408, 5409, and 5411-5413 transferred to OSL in 1928 and became numbers 5314-5318. In 1931, the OSL returned number 5014 to the OWR&N and converted. 5315, 5316 & 5317 to oil-fired in 1931. These OWRR&N locomotives were retired as follows: number 5408 in 1952, number 5400, 5403 & 5407 in 1954, number 5414 in 1956 and the other six were retired in 1955. OSL retired the former OWR&N locomotives as follows: number 5317 in 1952, numbers 5315 & 5318 in 1956 and number 5316 in 1957.
  6. Number 5045 was sold to the Litchfield & Madison Railroad in December 1947 and became number 201 on that railroad. The other nine locomotives were retired as follows: number 5048 in 1952, number 5040 in 1953, numbers 5042, 5043 & 5046 in 1954, numbers 5044 & 5049 in 1955, and number 5047 in 1957.
  7. Numbers 5050-5052 were all retired in 1955.
  8. Numbers 5053-5089 were retired as follows: number 5070 in 1948, number 5076 in 1950, number 5059 in 1952, numbers 5054, 5055, 5058, 5061, 5062, 5066, 5068, 5075, 5077, 5081, 5082, 5084 & 5086 in 1954, numbers 5053, 5057, 5060, 5067, 5073, 5074, 5083, 5085, 5087 & 5089 in 1955, numbers 5056, 5065, 5069, 5071, 5072, 5079 & 5088 in 1956, number 5080 in 1957 and numbers 5063, 5064 & 5078 in 1957. After retirement number 5063 was assigned to snow protection service at Cheyenne, WY, number 5064 was assigned to snow protection service at Laramie, WY and number 5078 was assigned to snow protection service at Denver, CO.
  9. Numbers 5306-5313 were retired as follows: numbers 5306 & 5308 in 1950, number 5312 in 1954, numbers 5309, 5310 & 5313 in 1955, number 5311 in 1956 and number 5307 in 1957. After retirement number 5307 was assigned to snow protection at Rawlins, WY.
  10. Numbers 5500-5014 were retired as follows: numbers 5500, 5505, 5506 & 5510 in 1949, number 5504 in 1950, number 5507 & 5508 in 1954, numbers 5501, 5502, 5509, 5512, 5513 & 5514 in 1955, number 5503 in 1956 and number 5511 in 1962. Number 5511 is preserved and is currently in storage at the UP Engine House in Cheyenne, WY.
  11. Numbers 5515-5524 were retired as follows: numbers 5520, 5521& 5523 in 1949, numbers 5515, 5519 & 5522 in 1955 and numbers 5516, 5517, 5518 & 5524 in 1956.

Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class 100 (Locobase 15201)

Data from DeGolyer, Volume 69, pp. 164+. Works numbers were 46492-46493 in September 1917, 46710-46711 in October, 46887, 46960 in November, 53845, 53910 in October 1920, and 56201 in March 1923.

These were duplicates of the TTTs bought by the Union Pacific over several years (e.g., Locobase 6590) with some differences. The class's firebox heating surface area included 99 sq ft (9.2 sq m) in the combustion chamber and 29.5 sq ft (2.75 sq m) of arch tubes. Piston valves measured 15" (381 mm) in diameter. Power reverse gear was Ragonnet Type B.

Water and coal were carried in the usual Vanderbilt cylindrical tender.

The URwy was operated by United States Smelting Company, which retired and scrapped them in January 1953 and April 1955, respectively.


Class TTT-1 (Locobase 87)

Data from table in 1930 Locomotive Cyclopedia. See also DeGolyer, Volume 56, pp. 262+ and "2-10-2 Type Locomotives for the UP", Railway Mechanical Engineer, Volume 92, No 6 (June 1918), pp. 321-324. See Richard Duley's detailed discussion of the TTTs in Wes Barris's Steam Locomotive.com website at http://www.steamlocomotive.com/santafe/?page=up, last accessed 26 March 2015. (Thanks to Chris Hohl for his 1 May 2016 email noting tender capacities and weights.) Works numbers were 45879-45881, 45957, 45984-45986 in July; 46064, 46170-46171 in August.

These were the first of TTT (Two-Ten-Two) that had similar cylinder and driver dimensions. (NB: Gordon McCulloh emailed Locobase in September 2012 to remind him that the UP would never have called these engines "Santa Fes".) The RME's report said that Superintendent of motive power and machinery C E Fuller and mechanical engineer A H Fetters had the Ogden, Utah-Evanston, Wyoming division in mind. The goal was have a single TTT handle on this section the same tonnage (with ruling grades soon to be 1.14%, compensated for curves) as the Mikados did east of Evanston (ruling grade of 0.81%).

This first group had 32 sq ft (3 sq m) of arch tubes contributing to the firebox heating surface. About half were fitted with Elesco feedwater heaters. The other half had Coffin type which added about 700 lb (317.5 kg) to the adhesion weight. Firebox heating surface area included 99 sq ft (9.2 sq m) in the combustion chamber and 29.5 sq ft (2.75 sq m) in the arch tubes. 15" (381 mm) piston valves admitted steam to the nearly square cylinders.

Original cylindrical Vanderbilt tender weights and capacities were as follows: 10,000 US gallons (37,850 litres), 17 tons (15.45 kg) of coal, empty weight was 65,000 lb (29,484 kg) which increased to 174,000 lb (78,925 kg) when fully loaded. 5007 was later converted to oil-burning and sent to the Los Angeles & Salt Lake for helper service on the Cajon Pass.

The specification has a little note about wheelbases: "Distance between first and second pair of drivers to be increased 5" [127 mm] to permit of a satisfactory brake design. Driving and total wheelbase to be increased the same amount." Underscoring the impact even a small change could have on such a complex machine, the spec stated that the cylinders were to be move forward 5" and the "smokebox, piston rods and guides to be lengthened the same amount." A key reason for adding length to all these components? It left the valve motion the same "as now shown by Ry. Co's prints."

TTT-2 was assigned to the six engines sent to the Los Angeles & Salt Lake, but quickly diverted in 1918 to another UP subsidiary, the Oregon Short Line; see Locobase 16217.

TTT-3 referred to the five 1919 locomotives from Baldwin, which, as Chris Hohl notes, were oil-fired from the start. Numbered 5010-5014 by the UP, four were transferred to the Los Angeles & Salt Lake in 1928 as their 5526-5529. 5014 remained with the UP. As delivered, their cylindrical Vanderbilt tenders' empty weight was 65,000 lb (29,484 kg).

Retirements began in 1948 and took most of a decade to complete.


Class TTT-2 (Locobase 16217)

Data from table in 1930 Locomotive Cyclopedia. See also DeGolyer, Volume 56, pp. 294+ See Richard Duley's detailed discussion of the TTTs in Wes Barris's Steam Locomotive.com website at http://www.steamlocomotive.com/santafe/?page=up, last accessed 26 March 2015. (Thanks to Chris Hohl for his 1 May 2016 email noting tender capacities and weights.) Works numbers were 47652 in January 1918 and 47800-47801, 47921-47922, 47965 in February.

Locobase 87 shows the first ten of this class, which were delivered 1917 to the LA&SL's parent Union Pacific as their TTT-1 class. Not quite a year later, the LA&SL ordered these nearly identical TTT-2s with tenders carrying 9,800 US gallons (37.093 litres) of water and 5,200 gallons (19,682 litres) of oil. A note in a roster collection reports that curve limits led the LA&SL to transfer this sextet to the OSL in June 1920. At that point, the oil-burning equipment was replaced by coal-burning grates and the tenders shown in the Locobase specs.

Firebox heating surface area included 99 sq ft (9.2 sq m) in the combustion chamber and 29.5 sq ft (2.75 sq m) in the arch tubes. 15" (381 mm) piston valves admitted steam to the nearly square cylinders.

Original cylindrical Vanderbilt tender weights and capacities were as follows: 10,000 US gallons (37,850 litres), 17 tons (15.45 kg) of coal, empty weight was 65,000 lb (29,484 kg) which increased to 174,000 lb (78,925 kg) when fully loaded.


Class TTT-3 (Locobase 16218)

Data from table in 1930 Locomotive Cyclopedia. See also DeGolyer, Volume 56, pp. 310+ See Richard Duley's detailed discussion of the TTTs in Wes Barris's Steam Locomotive.com website at http://www.steamlocomotive.com/santafe/?page=up, last accessed 26 March 2015. (Thanks to Chris Hohl for his 1 May 2016 email noting tender capacities and weights.) Works numbers were 51645 in March 1918, 51677 in April; 51763, 51831-51832 in May.

Locobase 16217 shows the six locomotive ordered by the Los Angeles & Salt Lake as oil burners; they had slight changes from the first ten TTTs described in Locobase 87. The next five locomotives, built to the TTT-2 specs, appear in this entry.

As with the TTT-2s, firebox heating surface area included 99 sq ft (9.2 sq m) in the combustion chamber and 29.5 sq ft (2.75 sq m) in the four arch tubes. 15" (381 mm) piston valves admitted steam to the nearly square cylinders.

Original cylindrical Vanderbilt tender weights and capacities were as follows: 10,000 US gallons (37,850 litres), 17 tons (15.45 kg) of coal, empty weight was 65,000 lb (29,484 kg) which increased to 174,000 lb (78,925 kg) when fully loaded.

The first four (5010-5013) were sold to the LA&SL for helper service on the Cajon Pass. They were converted to oil-burning.


Class TTT-4 (Locobase 6590)

Data from UP 10 - 1936 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 69, pp. 147+ and "New Pacific and Santa Fe Type Locomotives for the Union Pacific System," Railway and Locomotive Engineering, Volume 34, No 1 (January 1921), pp. 3-4. See Richard Duley's detailed discussion of the TTTs in Wes Barris's Steam Locomotive.com website at http://www.steamlocomotive.com/santafe/?page=up, last accessed 26 March 2015. Works numbers were 53403-53404, 53435-53436, 53465-53466 in July 1920; 53506-53507, 53527-53528, 53558-53559, 53616 in August; 53617, 53647-53648, 53675-53677, 53705-53706, 53746 in September; 53844, 53909 in October; 53943 in November.

Delivered after the first World War, these were duplicates of the first batch (Locobase 87). Baldwin estimated the class's adhesion weight at 300,000 lb (136,078 kg) and total weight of 370,000 lb (167,829 kg).

Firebox heating surface area included 32 sq ft (3 sq m) in four arch tubes and 87 sq ft (8.1 sq m) in the combustion chamber; Baldwin's specifications (used in the table here) showed 29.5 sq ft (2.75 sq m) for the arch tubes and 99 sq ft (9.2 sq m) for the combustion chamber. Cylinders received steam through 15" (381 mm) piston valves.

Many later received feed water heaters. Sixteen were fitted with Worthington-4-BL, three had Worthington-4-AS (5026-5027, 5036), Elesco K-50s went into five (5019-5023), and 5024 used the Coffin C-87.


Class TTT-5 (Locobase 15996)

Data from DeGolyer, Volume 69, pp. 177+. See Richard Duley's detailed discussion of the TTTs in Wes Barris's Steam Locomotive.com website at http://www.steamlocomotive.com/santafe/?page=up, last accessed 26 March 2015. (Thanks to Chris Hohl for his 1 May 2016 email noting the proper range of road numbers and the original tender capacities.) Works numbers were 55903-55904 in December 1922; 55994-55996, 56077-56080 in January 1923; and 56195-56199 in March.

Continuing in the line of TTTs first described in Locobase 87, this batch of fifteen was assigned to the OWR&N's territory; the cab sides were labeled Union Pacific and the tenders bore the Oregon subsidiary's initials. A few tweaks to boiler proportions were the only real differences. Firebox heating surface area included 96 sq ft (8.9 sq m) in the combustion chamber and 30 sq ft (2.8 sq m) in the four arch tubes. Balanced piston valves measured 15" (381 mm) in diameter. The original tender held 12,000 US gallons (45,420 litres) of water.

5408 was transferred to the Oregon Short line in 1928 and renumbered 5314; it was returned to the OWR&N in 1931. Four others--5409, 5411-5413--also went and took OSL road numbers 5315-5318


Class TTT-6 (Locobase 6591)

Data from 1938 to 1958 Union Pacific Locomotive and Tender Diagrams- Part II (Greater than 70 FT) supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 69, pp. 247+. See Locobase 6082 for a full description of this uncommon valve gear. (Locobase thanks Gordon McCulloh for his 3 February 2012 email asking about the TTTs, which induced a rewrite of several entries.) See Richard Duley's detailed discussion of the TTTs in Wes Barris's Steam Locomotive.com website at http://www.steamlocomotive.com/santafe/?page=up, last accessed 26 March 2015.

Lima works numbers were 6612-6616 in October 1923).

The last five Limas in the TTT-6 class shared every characteristic with the previous 45 locomotives save one: the firebox was completely changed. Grate area stayed the same, but in place of 32 sq ft (3 sq m) of arch tubes, the new firebox had 118 sq ft (11 sq m) of Nicholson thermic syphons. The change increased the direct heating surface by 20%.

A Trainorders forum thread headed UP Steam Question and started by "yardclerk" included a 6 December 2006 entry, time-stamped 4:32 AM (http://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?10,1299181, last accessed 8 February 2012) in which "4-12-2" offered some reasons for UP's adoption of this gear:

"All of UP's 4-8-2's were built with Young gear, which did possess a number of advantages and in tests clearly demonstrated more power on an otherwise identically equipped Waschaert geared engine. Comments by railroad test forces were along the lines of "The Young engine has proven itself in efficiency, in so far as it could life a much heavier train, without having to take the slack, which the Walschaert engine almost always had to do; and it has proven itself in power, also capacity for making very high speed ....." The same guy also mentioned that "...the ease with which this engine rides, the absence of that lateral vibration, nosing, usually found in most engines." Of course, many other tests were also conducted ... John."

Gordon McCulloh, long-time researched into things Union Pacific, spelled out in a different way, in a September 2012 email, why the Union Pacific stayed with the Young gear. First he outlined the advantages of using this particular form of outside radial valve gear: "Its primary advantages were two. One, without the eccentric links of Walschaert, dynamic augment was all but eliminated. Two, the valve opening and closing cycles were of very short duration and thus steam flowed much more readily. Graphing the valve position and cycle timing for Walschaert was a long sloping line either opening or closing but the Young gear presents a more box-like form with quick opening and quick closing to and from whatever setting was used. Thus maximum steam pressure could be applied almost immediately with the Young even with a limited throttle opening, thus offering a much higher per-square-inch-pressure without excessive volume and the typical resultant slipping. The throttle was thus able to just keep up with flow without excessive volume."

McCulloh then recounted one problem: "Union Pacific had significant issues with the cross-shaft of the Young gear on both of these classes which led to experiments in 1932/33 on two of their 4-8-2s. One got Caprotti 'poppet' gear and the other was fitted with Walschaert. [That period] being lean times further work on this issue was put off for a while."

Meanwhile, McCulloh reports, another innovation contributed to relief of the dynamic augment problem: "General Steel Castings introduced their Box-Spoke (box-pok)driving wheel circa 1935 and that solved the dynamic augment problem of locos with Walschaert and thus circa 1939/40 UP began retrofitting all 7000 and 7800 class 4-8-2s with Walschaert gear so they could run much faster."

For the TTT-6s and 7s, "[t]hey just kept patching-at the cross shaft problem (timing of the left valve) on the TTT-6s & 7s and at least one engineer felt the reduction of dynamic augment (pounding) with universal adoption of box-pok main drivers on the TTTs was sufficient to allow continued operation without the complete rebuild and significant expense on the TTT-6s and 7s, especially since by that time they were rebuilding 2-8-8-0 Mallets simple and buying new articulated 4-6-6-4s and 4-8-8-4s. The TTTs were no longer THE heavy 'fast' mainline freight power."

The class divided its feedwater-heater installations into the Coffin closed-system and two types of Worthington open-system heaters. Coffin C-87 heaters were fitted in 5048, 5069-5073, and 5075-5084. Worthington-4-BL heaters went into 5041-5047, 5053-5055, 5057, 5074, 5079 and Worthington - 4S would be found in 5049-5052, 5056, 5058-5068, and the Worthington 5-SA was installed only in 5078.


Class TTT-6 (Locobase 16220)

Data from DeGolyer, Volume 69, pp. 210+. ( (Locobase thanks Gordon McCulloh for his 3 Feb 2012 email asking about the TTTs, which induced a rewrite of several entries and Chris Hohl for his 1 May 2016 email pointing out Baldwin's delivery of these locomotives as oil burners and supplying information on weights and capacities. See Richard Duley's detailed discussion of the TTTs in Wes Barris's Steam Locomotive.com website at http://www.steamlocomotive.com/santafe/?page=up, last accessed 26 March 2015. ) Works numbers were 56714-56716 in July 1923.

These were the first Baldwins to use Young's valve gear. (See Locobases 6591 and 230 for discussions of the UP's adoption of Young valve gear.) As in the others, firebox heating surface area included 96 sq ft (8.9 sq m) in the combustion chamber and 30 sq ft (2.79 sq m) in four arch tubes. Balanced piston valves measured 15" (381 mm) in diameter.


Class TTT-6 (Locobase 16221)

Data from UP 10 - 1936 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.. See Richard Duley's detailed discussion of the TTTs in Wes Barris's Steam Locomotive.com website at http://www.steamlocomotive.com/santafe/?page=up, last accessed 26 March 2015. (Thanks to Chris Hohl for his 1 May 2016 email noting the proper range of road numbers and the original tender capacities.) Alco-Brooks works numbers were 64407-64414 in July 1923.

Alco's Brooks works, Baldwin, and Lima all supplied locomotives grouped in the TTT-6 class. These first eight from Brooks went directly to the OSL. They were equipped with 10,500 lb (4,763 kg) tractive effort trailing-truck boosters for a little over 5 years, but had them removed in 1934.

5306 and 5308 were retired in July 1950. All but one of the rest were withdrawn between October 1954 and August 1956. 6307 was withdrawn in April 1958, but retained for snow-protection duty.


Class TTT-6 - Alco, Lima (Locobase 16219)

Data from UP 10 - 1936 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.. See Richard Duley's detailed discussion of the TTTs in Wes Barris's Steam Locomotive.com website at http://www.steamlocomotive.com/santafe/?page=up, last accessed 26 March 2015. (Thanks to Chris Hohl for his 1 May 2016 email noting the proper range of road numbers and the original tender capacities.) Alco-Brooks works numbers were 64415-64424 in August 1923. Lima works numbers were 6580-6582 in July 1923, 6583-6604 in August, 6605-6611 in September.

Adding dozens of locomotives to Union Pacific's already considerable TTT stud, this large set of TTT-6s differed from most other TTTs in a) showing less superheater area, b) using Young's valve gear, and and c) not being Baldwins. Locobase doesn't know the order details, but both builders delivered engines in the same months with Lima getting the lion's share. Two other TTT-6 entries show the three Baldwins, which were produced to a different spec (Locobase 16220), and the last five Limas (Locobase 6591), which had significantly different firebox layouts.


Class TTT-6/TTT-7 (Locobase 15997)

Data from DeGolyer, Volume 69, pp. 229+. ( (Locobase thanks Gordon McCulloh for his 3 Feb 2012 email asking about the TTTs, which induced a rewrite of several entries and Chris Hohl for his 1 May 2016 email pointing out Baldwin's delivery of these locomotives as oil burners and supplying information on weights and capacities.) See Richard Duley's detailed discussion of the TTTs in Wes Barris's Steam Locomotive.com website at http://www.steamlocomotive.com/santafe/?page=up, last accessed 26 March 2015. Works numbers were 56769, 56772-56774 in June 1923; 56845-56847, 56897-56899, 56900, 56999 in August; 57030-57032 in September; 57793-57795, 57820-57821, 57826-57827, 57836-57838 in June 1924.

This class mirrored other Baldwin TTT-6s in their specs except for use of oil fuel and the consequent deletion of firebox arch tubes. Thus firebox heating surface area decreased by 30 sq ft, but still included 96 sq ft (8.9 sq m) in the combustion chamber. Balanced piston valves measured 15" (381 mm) in diameter. See Locobases 6591 and 230 for discussions of the UP's adoption of Young valve gear.

A diagram supplied by Gordon McCulloh shows that 5507, 5509-5510 were fitted with the Worthington 4-BL feed water heater; the others used the Coffin C-87.

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class100TTT-1TTT-2TTT-3TTT-4
Locobase ID15201 87 16217 16218 6590
RailroadUtah Railway (UP)Union Pacific (UP)Los Angeles & Salt Lake (UP)Union Pacific (UP)Union Pacific (UP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-10-22-10-22-10-22-10-22-10-2
Number in Class9106525
Road Numbers100-1085000-50093800-3805/5300-53055010-5014/5526-55295015-5039
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built9106525
BuilderBaldwinBaldwinBaldwinBaldwinBaldwin
Year19201917191819181920
Valve GearWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase22.50'22.50'22.50'22.50'22.50'
Engine Wheelbase41.42'41.42'41.42'41.42'41.42'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.54 0.54 0.54 0.54 0.54
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)79.42'77.50'77.50'80.35'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)58000 lbs58000 lbs58000 lbs58700 lbs
Weight on Drivers300000 lbs288700 lbs290000 lbs290000 lbs293500 lbs
Engine Weight365130 lbs362200 lbs368000 lbs368000 lbs376100 lbs
Tender Light Weight217200 lbs287000 lbs226800 lbs226800 lbs217200 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight582330 lbs649200 lbs594800 lbs594800 lbs593300 lbs
Tender Water Capacity12000 gals15000 gals10000 gals10000 gals12000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)20 tons21 tons17 tons17 tons20 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)100 lb/yard96 lb/yard97 lb/yard97 lb/yard98 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter63"63"63"63"63"
Boiler Pressure200 psi200 psi200 psi200 psi200 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)29.5" x 30"29.5" x 30"29.5" x 30"29.5" x 30"29.5" x 30"
Tractive Effort70449 lbs70449 lbs70449 lbs70449 lbs70449 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.26 4.10 4.12 4.12 4.17
Heating Ability
Firebox Area377.50 sq. ft368 sq. ft377.50 sq. ft377.50 sq. ft377.50 sq. ft
Grate Area84 sq. ft84 sq. ft84 sq. ft84 sq. ft84 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface5152 sq. ft5117 sq. ft5152 sq. ft5152 sq. ft5152 sq. ft
Superheating Surface1262 sq. ft1165 sq. ft1262 sq. ft1262 sq. ft1262 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface6414 sq. ft6282 sq. ft6414 sq. ft6414 sq. ft6414 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume217.09215.61217.09217.09217.09
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation1680016800168001680016800
Same as above plus superheater percentage2016019992201602016020160
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area9060087584906009060090600
Power L11627915434162791627916279
Power MT598.15589.30618.78618.78611.40

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassTTT-5TTT-6TTT-6TTT-6TTT-6 - Alco, Lima
Locobase ID15996 6591 16220 16221 16219
RailroadOregon Washington RR&N (UP)Union Pacific (UP)Los Angeles & Salt Lake (UP)Oregon Short Lines (UP)Union Pacific (UP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-10-22-10-22-10-22-10-22-10-2
Number in Class1553842
Road Numbers5400-54145085-50895050-50525306-53135040-5049, 5053-5084
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built1553842
BuilderBaldwinLimaBaldwinAlco-Brooksseveral
Year19221923192319231922
Valve GearWalschaertYoungYoungYoungYoung
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase22.50'22.50'22.50'22.50'22.50'
Engine Wheelbase41.42'41.42'41.42'41.42'41.42'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.54 0.54 0.54 0.54 0.54
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)79.62'80.35'79.37'79.37'79.37'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)58000 lbs59500 lbs58000 lbs59500 lbs
Weight on Drivers288700 lbs297500 lbs288700 lbs307700 lbs297500 lbs
Engine Weight362200 lbs383900 lbs362200 lbs397100 lbs383900 lbs
Tender Light Weight287000 lbs218100 lbs231000 lbs287000 lbs287000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight649200 lbs602000 lbs593200 lbs684100 lbs670900 lbs
Tender Water Capacity15000 gals12000 gals12000 gals12000 gals12000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)20 tons20 tons5200 gals20 tons20 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)96 lb/yard99 lb/yard96 lb/yard103 lb/yard99 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter63"63"63"63"63"
Boiler Pressure200 psi200 psi200 psi200 psi200 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)29.5" x 30"29.5" x 30"29.5" x 30"29.5" x 30"29.5" x 30"
Tractive Effort70449 lbs70449 lbs70449 lbs70449 lbs70449 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.10 4.22 4.10 4.37 4.22
Heating Ability
Firebox Area371 sq. ft454 sq. ft371 sq. ft368 sq. ft368 sq. ft
Grate Area84 sq. ft84 sq. ft84 sq. ft84 sq. ft84 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface5145 sq. ft5193 sq. ft5115 sq. ft5117 sq. ft5117 sq. ft
Superheating Surface1252 sq. ft1165 sq. ft1252 sq. ft1165 sq. ft1165 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface6397 sq. ft6358 sq. ft6367 sq. ft6282 sq. ft6282 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume216.79218.81215.53215.61215.61
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation1680016800168001680016800
Same as above plus superheater percentage2016019824201601999219992
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area89040107144890408758487584
Power L11616515882161381543415434
Power MT617.21588.47616.18552.91571.87

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassTTT-6/TTT-7
Locobase ID15997
RailroadLos Angeles & Salt Lake (UP)
CountryUSA
Whyte2-10-2
Number in Class25
Road Numbers5500-5524
GaugeStd
Number Built25
BuilderBaldwin
Year1923
Valve GearYoung
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase22.50'
Engine Wheelbase41.42'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.54
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)79.37'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)58000 lbs
Weight on Drivers288700 lbs
Engine Weight362200 lbs
Tender Light Weight231000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight593200 lbs
Tender Water Capacity12000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)5200 gals
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)96 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter63"
Boiler Pressure200 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)29.5" x 30"
Tractive Effort70449 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.10
Heating Ability
Firebox Area341 sq. ft
Grate Area84 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface5115 sq. ft
Superheating Surface1252 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface6367 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume215.53
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation16800
Same as above plus superheater percentage20160
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area81840
Power L116005
Power MT611.10

Photos

Reference


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