Atlantic & Pacific / California Southern / Chicago, Kansas & Western / Crosbyton-South Plains / Gulf, Beaumont & Kansas City / Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe / Hutchison & Southern / Nevada Southern / Prescott & Eastern / Randsburg / San Francisco & San Joaquin Valley / Santa Fe / Santa Fe Pacific / Santa Fe Prescott & Phoenix 4-6-0 "Ten-wheeler" Locomotives of the USA


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class 1 (Locobase 8982)

Data from AT&SF 9 - 1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 19, p. 263. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema. Works numbers were 14332-14334 in June 1895 and 14899-14901 in June 1896.

The SF&SJV operated these locomotives on a railroad that Claus Spreckels, the leading sugar refiner on the west coast at the time, financially backed to provide an alternative to the Southern Pacific for use by the Valley's growers. Once the financing had been secured (no easy task), construction began in 1896 and the railroad extended from San Francisco to Bakersfield and Visalia by 30 June 1898. As had been hoped, construction of a well-placed rival to the Espee in the Central Valley attracted the Santa Fe. That railroad leased the SF & SJV in 1898.

The later diagram showed a slight increase in firebox heating surface area to 160 sq ft (14.86 sq m) and a commensurate increase in evaporative heating surface area to 1,923 sq ft (178.65 sq m). The diagram also showed a slight difference in adhesion wheelbase (3/4"/19 mm longer).

Four of this class (308, 313, 314, and 308, respectively) remained with the Santa Fe until they were scrapped in 1924, 1925, and 1927. Los Angeles Rock & Gravel bought the 311 in 1923. 309 and 312 were sold to the Modesto & Empire Traction Company, a freight transfer line, in 1928.


Class 1 / 142 (2) (Locobase 8906)

Data from AT&SF 9 - 1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 19, p. 3. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema .

This was a single diamond-stacked Ten-wheeler locomotive (works #13748) of typical construction and a spec that instructed the builder to "give outside of boiler two good coats of paint." Its firebox heating surface area was later measured at 155 sq ft, (14.4 sq m) which led to an evaporative heating surface area amounting to 1,550 sq ft (144 sq m).

It was brought into the Santa Fe in 1903 from the California Eastern, which had taken over the Nevada Southern in 1895. It appears to have been the only locomotive owned by either the NS or the CE. It was identical to the larger 283 class except for a set of smaller drivers.

The Santa Fe scrapped the 142 in February 1927.


Class 1 / 2421 (Locobase 8395)

Data from AT&SF 9 -1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema . Works numbers were 2235, 2237-2238 in February 1893, 2321-2323 in June, 2476-2477 in October 1894, and 2521-2522 in February 1895

Shown in the 1920 book as SFP&P engines and numbered 1-9, this class came with two wheelbases and originally went to two railroads. The first five had a longer driven wheelbase of 14 ft and an engine wheelbase measuring 23 ft 10 in. 6-12 had the shorter wheelbase shown in the specs.

According to Werkema's roster, the first nine went to the SFP & P in 1893-1895, the last three to the Prescott & Eastern (a non-operating subsidiary) in 1898; see Locobase 2980.

The railway itself is the subject of a 24 January 1999 article by Eleanor Gilley preserved on the Sharlot Hall Museum website -- http://www.sharlot.org/archives/history/dayspast/text/1999_01_24.shtml, accessed 6 May 2007. (The museum's focus is Yavapai County.)

Gilley's article on the "Peavine" begins:

"As the railroad left Prescott on the west side, it began its slow ascent for nine miles to the summit of the Sierra Prieta Mountains at Prieta, elevation 6,108 feet. The view from the top was breathtakingly beautiful with the black range of mountains, the Mogollan Rim and the surrounding scenery. The line then descended for 14 miles past Iron Springs and Ramsgate Hill around twisting, winding 12 degree curves and challenging three percent grades to Skull Valley, elevation 4,240 feet.

...It was called an engineering masterpiece. There were many fills, deep cuts and long timber trestles. Near Devil's Gate, a cut of 57 feet was required through solid rock. A 25 foot deep hole was drilled and loaded with powder to produce the largest discharge ever executed by a single shot in this territory. Fortunately, the workers had been asked to leave camp because one large rock went through a tent with such force that if it had not bounced, it would have buried itself."

Gilley later tells us that the nickname came from a comment about the route, which twisted like a peavine.Intended to link Northern Arizona towns like Prescott with the Atlantic & Pacific mainline of the Santa Fe, the Prescott & Central Arizona was a combination of two rival groups of investors that opened its Prescott-Seligman leg at 31 December 1886.

But the railway was not successful and needed further infusions. The result was the SF P & P, which was incorporated in 1891. The "Scenic Railway of Arizona" dropped south from the A & P's Ash Fork junction through Chino Valley and Granite Dells to Prescott. That section opened on 24 April 1893 with the segment south of Prescott opening on 4 March 1895. The SFP & P, which had taken operating control of the Arizona & California in 1905, itself was merged into the Santa Fe's non-operating subsidiary California, Arizona & Santa Fe.


Class 1/2/260 (Locobase 8980)

Data from AT&SF 9 - 1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also "Model of Richmond Compound for Purdue University", Railroad Gazette, Vol XXX, No 14 (8 April 1898), p. 262.

This locomotive was originally produced in September 1894 by Richmond (works number 2427) as a cross-compound with one 19" HP and one 30" LP cylinder, each with a 24" stroke. Quickly dubbed the "Richmond Tramp", the engine demonstrated the Richmond variation of the two-cyinder compound with intercepting valve to such trunk lines as the Michigan Central, Milwaukee, and Rock Island. Two years later, an apparent need for more power resulted in the refitting of the Tramp with a 20" & 32" x 26" cylinder arrangement.

After its publicity tour, the Tramp arrived in Arizona in December 1897 as the Randsburg Railway's Engine #1. The use of Randsburg and Johannesburg, its principal mining town, linked the Randsburg's gold mines such as the Yellow Aster with those of the Boer State in South Africa.

In 1903, the Santa Fe took control of the Randsburg and renamed the 28.5 miles (48.9 km) part of its Arizona & Utah subsidiary and renumbered the 1 as 2. In 1905, the Santa Fe took full control and gave the 2 number 260. In 1911, the replaced the compound setup with two 20" x 26" simple-expansion cylinders.

It was scrapped in November 1924.


Class 10/2421 (Locobase 2980)

Data from Catalogue Descriptive of Simple and Compound Locomotives built by Brooks Locomotive Works, Dunkirk, NY (Buffalo, NY: Matthew-Northrup Company, 1899. See Eleanor Gilley's article "The First Railroad and the 'Battle for Prescott'", Sharlot Hall Museum Days Past, 24 January 1999 and 31 January 1999. (http://www.sharlot.org/archives/history/dayspast/days_show.pl?name=1999_01_31&h=;Santa%20Fe%20Prescott%20%26%20Phoenix;). Works numbers were 3072-3074 in November 1898; road numbers were assigned 11, 12, and 10, respectively.

The Ten-wheeler was a transitional type retaining older features such as a full cow catcher, spark-arresting stack that resembled an Olympic torch, and steam dome just ahead of the cab. The cab was steel with a high roof and transom window in front.

2430 was scrapped first in January 1922. 2432 went to the ferro-knacker in April of the same year. 2431 lasted another five years before being cut up in October 1927.


Class 100/643/283 (Locobase 8981)

Data from AT&SF 9 - 1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 18, p. 172. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema . Works numbers were 13269-13271, 13277, 13284-13285, 13293, 13298 in March 1893; 13353, 13357-13359, 13364, 13367-13369, 13384, 13388-13390, 13392-13394, 13418 (road #124) in April; and 13396 in May (road #123).

This incarnation of the A&P began service as the Missouri & Indian Territories in December 1880. By the time it ordered this large class of Ten-wheelers on 28 December 1892, the railroad owned over 800 miles of track and was headquartered in Albuquerque, NM.

The A&P was reorganized as the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe's subsidiary Santa Fe Pacific in July 1897, but the 100s kept their numbers for about a year. At that point, the parent renumbered the whole class in the following order: 643-644, 664, 645-651, 663, 666, 652-657, 667, 658-660, 662, 661.Two years later, the class again was renumbered, this time mostly consecutively from 284-306, 283, 307.

The class ran for about three decades. Two were scrapped early, likely as the result of heavy damage in accidents: 301 went to the ferro-knacker's in August 1913, 299 in August 1916. The others were scrapped beginning in the early 1920s; first was 305 in January 1921, the last (283) in December 1931.

302 (ex-304, ex-120) was sold to the Apache Railway in September 1918 as their #2.


Class 12 / 143 (Locobase 8907)

Data from AT&SF 9 - 1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema .

This trio of small Ten-wheelers (works #2515-2517) formed part of the GB & KC roster when that railroad was taken over by the Santa Fe. 143 had 20 fewer tubes by 1920 and a total heating surface of 1,396 sq ft.


Class 13/2198 (Locobase 8236)

Data from AT&SF 7 -1901 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 13, p. 139. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema . 8270-8271, 8275-8277, 8280-8281, 8306 in December 1886; 8341-8342 in January 1887; 8393, 8397, 8522 in February; 8425-8428, 8450-8451, 8453, 8457 in March; 8517, 8520, 8523-8524.

Although numbered higher than the 2160s shown in Locobase 8235, these actually preceded that large set of Baldwins. This group was delivered with 2 1/4" fire tubes and a relatively large grate.

Most started out on the Chicago, Kansas & Western (CKW), an Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe subsidiary whose construction began in 1886 to support growth in western Kansas. Others were assigned to the Southern Kansas Railway, which was the first Santa Fe line to operate in the Texas Panhandle. Of these, many made their way to the Southern California railroad, another Santa Fe subsidiary. Ultimately those that remained in service were designated the 2200 class on the Santa Fe.

Most were scrapped by the Santa Fe at the end of their lives, but 9175 went to the Wichita Northwestern in July 1924 as its #9 and lasted until March 1941, when the WN was abandoned.


Class 14 / 2433 (Locobase 8893)

Data from AT&SF 9 -1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema .

Produced by the same builder that supplied the 12 in the mid-1890s (Locobase 8395), this trio was 10 years newer. Although the grate remained the same size and the boiler tubes were no longer, cylinder volume grew as did the number of tubes in the barrel. Also, boiler pressure increased and weight grew as well.

The 1920 diagram showed the class's provenance as the S F P & P, but Werkema's roster traces them back to the Arizona & California. The last was retired in 1929.


Class 141 (Locobase 8905)

Data from AT&SF 9 - 1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema .

The 1920 diagram book gives 16.8 sq for the grate area, but measures the firebox length and width as 96" x 33". That figure yields a more likely proportion between firebox and boiler, and that is the number used.


Class 142 (Locobase 8225)

Data from AT&SF 7 -1901 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema .

Oddly, this class of Rhodies had only a short career on the Santa Fe, leaving service by 1903.


Class 151 (Locobase 8231)

Data from AT&SF 7 -1901 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema .

This is part of a very large class of Ten-wheelers supplied by a single builder in just two years. This smaller group had the shorter tubes, which cut heating surface area by 68 sq ft. The other 55 are profiled on Locobase 8232.

The last in either class left service in 1937.


Class 158 (Locobase 8232)

Data from AT&SF 7 -1901 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema .

As noted in Locobase 8231, Brooks supplied this large class of Ten-wheelers in just two years. Most of the 4-6-0s had the longer boiler shown in this entry's specs. This meant a longer wheelbase as well.

The last in either class left service in 1937.


Class 17 (Locobase 8896)

Data from AT&SF 9 -1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema . Brooks works numbers for 17-18 were 1862 in April 1891 and 1869 in May.

See Eleanor Gilley's article "The First Railroad and the 'Battle for Prescott'", Sharlot Hall Museum Days Past, 24 January 1999 and 31 January 1999. (http://www.sharlot.org/archives/history/dayspast/days_show.pl?name=1999_01_31&h=;Santa%20Fe%20Prescott%20%26%20Phoenix;). See also George B Abdill, A Locomotive Engineer's Album (Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1965), p. 139. Abdill's description of this Brooks design was "neat" (for which the Dunkirk, NY builder had acquired a reputation). The photo shows a steel cab with a large window divided by an almost invisible sash.


Class 22/90/464 (Locobase 8992)

Data from AT&SF 9 - 1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 19, p. 67. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema. Works numbers were 13909-13912 in 1893..

Seven years after the CS took delivery of seven Ten-wheelers from Baldwin (Locobase 8988), it returned to that builder for four more. Other than a 20% increase in boiler pressure and a 1"-greater piston diameter, the design remained essentially the same. Once the Southern California took over, the numbers were changed, and the Santa Fe changed them again in 1904. The last of the class was retired in 1935.


Class 221 (Locobase 8230)

Data from AT&SF 7 -1901 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema .

One of the largest single classes of Ten-wheelers on the Santa Fe, this group was quite typical of an early '90s 4-6-0 design. The diagram gives the boiler pressure as 180 psi, which seems high and may reflect a redesign later in the decade.

The last of this mixed-traffic class retired in 1934.


Class 246 (Locobase 8233)

Data from AT&SF 7 -1901 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema .

Like most of the Santa Fe's 4-6-0s, this class enjoyed a long career with the last engine retiring in 1938.


Class 256 (Locobase 8234)

Data from AT&SF 7 -1901 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 19, p.68. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema. Works numbers were 13957-13961.

Very like the shorter Brooks engines of 1891 (Locobase 8231), this quintet of Baldwins came to the Santa Fe three years later. A larger firebox measurement of 142 sq ft (13.2 sq m) sometime later led to the 1901 figure of 1,542 sq ft (143.87 sq m) in evaporative heating surface area.

For some reason, they lasted only a few years on the Santa Fe. The class leader - 856 - may never actually have operated on the railroad as it soon appeared on the Chicago & La Junta.

The other four were renumbered twice, first as 642 and 638-640 then as 256-259. In 1902, they found a new home on the Canadian Northern, where they were numbered 60, 61, 56, 57 respectively (later 1203-1204, 1202, 1205). All were retired in 1917.


Class 261 (Locobase 8226)

Data from AT&SF 7 -1901 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema .


Class 3/0226 (Locobase 8399)

Data from AT&SF 9 -1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 45, pp. 185-186. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema. Works number was 39352 in February 1913.

Chartered in Texas as the C-SPR in 1910, the railroad actually entered service under Santa Fe ownership as the South Plains & Santa Fe in 1916. The SP&SF was leased to the Panhandle & Santa Fe in 1917, a relationship that lasted until a merger in 1948. The first 64-mile segment from Lubbock to Seagrave opened on 1 July 1918. At that time , the SP & SF reported owning two locomotives, one of which was the mixed-traffic Ten-wheeler shown in the data.


Class 348/760/315 (Locobase 8983)

Data from AT&SF 9 -1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 13, p. 24. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema. Works numbers were 7873-7835 and 7883 in April 1886 and 8246-8247 in November.

The Santa Fe stud of Ten-wheelers grew and grew and this class was among the early designs. As delivered, these engines trailed tenders carrying 3,500 US gallons of water (13,248 litres). The 4-6-0s had nearly 40-year careers before being scrapped in the 1920s.


Class 354 (Locobase 8241)

Data from AT&SF 7 -1901 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema .

One of the larger orders for Ten-wheelers on the SFP was this large tender to Pittsburgh. The first 10 had 230 tubes, the rest 228 as shown in the specs. These were the most seriously single-purposed 4-6-0s, their small-diameter drivers connoting their drag-freight role. The last of the class was withdrawn in 1932.


Class 400 (Locobase 8984)

Data from AT&SF 9 - 1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema.

In the same year that Brooks delivered its batch of locomotives, Schenectady contributed this sextet. Although offering about the same amount of firebox heating surface, this design had fewer boiler tubes of shorter length. Some rode on 69" drivers and registered a lower tractive effort as a result.

The last of the class was retired in 1927.


Class 406 (Locobase 8239)

Data from AT&SF 7 -1901 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema . Works numbers were 1757-1762.

These passenger Ten-wheelers showed some growth over the earlier classes of Santa Fe 4-6-0s. The last was retired in 1925.


Class 419 (Locobase 8989)

Data from AT&SF 9 -1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema.

These followed up the Klondikes of 1897, which are described in Locobase 8242. For some reason, the 1899 batch (works #1032-1041) had 10 fewer tubes of shorter length. Even so, the class proved a good size with some operating for almost 40 years.


Class 429 Klondike (Locobase 8242)

Data from AT&SF 7 -1901 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also "Ten-Wheel Passenger Locomotive-AT & SF Railway, " American Engineer, Car Builder And Railroad Journal", Volume 71 (October 1897), pp. 329-331. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema .

1897 was the year of the Alaskan Gold Rush (the one immortalized in Charlie Chaplin's great feature film) and its promise, however illusory, attracted worldwide attention. Klondike (or Klondyke) was a nickname applied to many items, including at least three locomotive classes. One was Henry Ivatt's 4-4-2 Klondyke class, the other was this octet of Ten-wheelers. (A third was the Canadian Southern F-82; see Locobase 3480).

The Railroad Journal article mentions the extended wagon-top boiler design with "the [John S] Player patent combination crown bar and stay-bold type of crown-sheet staying." The combination appears to be a missing link between the older crown bar staying above the crown sheet, which was disappearing from locomotive designs, and the widely used stay-bolt systems then being adopted. The firebox had a brick arch and its 88" (2.235 m) x 42" (1.067 m) grate offered "a good comfortable size for the fireman to cover well."

They showed good size and power for their passenger service and the last wasn't retired until 1938.


Class 437 (Locobase 2792)

Data from AT&SF 7 -1901 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema .

Note that these express passenger engines were Player tandem compounds designed by Santa Fe's Superintendent of Motive Power. As with most tandem layouts, the lead cylinder was the high-pressure vessel and the rear assembly held the low-pressure cylinder; the two shared a single piston rod. Unlike the Baldwin tandem layout, John Player's layout had the two cylinders separated slightly.

Like most US-operated non-articulated compounds, these ran only a short time as such engines. By 1905, they had been rebuilt with two 19 1/2" x 28" cylinders.


Class 454 (Locobase 8990)

Data from AT&SF 9 - 1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also E D Worley, Iron Horses of the Santa Fe (Dallas: Southwest Railroad Historical Society, 1976), p. 235. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema.

In 1899, Dickson Manufacturing Company of Scranton, Pa supplied 10 Atlantics (4-4-2) to the Santa Fe; see Locobase 16086..

E D Worley colorfully describes the Topeka shop's role making the class over: "Topeka shops, a real winner ...in the sly conversion of silk purses into sow's ears[sic], eventually and quietly, altered the errant Atlantics into conventional, but reliable, 4-6-0s."

Locobase believes Worley mistakenly inverted the linguistic order (i.e, that the Santa Fe actually converted sow's ears into silk purses). In fact, sources agree that the railroad gained ten speedy 4-6-0s with taller drivers than before spread over a longer wheelbase.

The last of these operated until 1933.


Class 468 (Locobase 8227)

Data from AT&SF 7 -1901 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema .

What difference a decade made in the equipment Rhode Island supplied to the Santa Fe. Locobase 8225 shows a freight engine with modest proportions. This entry shows a mixed-traffic machine in sufficient numbers to represent a standard design. The boiler pressure and cylinder volume have both grown considerably. The grate, however, while it now sloped, still sat inside the drivers and could grow only in length (it was now 9 ft long).

Whatever their limitations, these Ten-wheelers endured with 472 going out of service in 1939 as the Santa Fe's last active 4-6-0.


Class 49/281 (Locobase 4887)

The first Ten-wheelers built by Baldwin for the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe and described in a 1906 Baldwin catalogue which is reproduced on http://catskillarchive.com/rrextra/blatsf.Html . See also DeGolyer, Volume 13, p. 13. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema . Works numbers were 7927 and 7931 in May 1886.

Locobase finds a pair numbered 281-282 in the AT&SF 7 - 1902 Description of Locomotives, but with a redesigned boiler. It was shorter (12 ft 3 in), held fewer tubes (172), and consequently had less tube heating surface. The cylinders measured 17 1/2" x 24".


Class 498 (Locobase 4150)

Data from 29 November 1901 Railroad Gazette. Works numbers were 19563-19567 in October 1901.

Vauclain compounds fitted with the relatively rare Vanderbilt boiler, which featured a cylindrical firebox (see Locobase 4104 for more). RG's report points out that an oil-burner uses all of the interior heating surface. Even so, one can see from the specifications that the percentage of heating surface provided by the firebox is still pretty low.

These five engines were converted to simple expansion in two 23" x 28" cylinders in 1911; at that time they were equipped with a more conventional firebox measuring about 49 sq ft in grate area. Still later, they were superheated with 155 2 1/4" tubes and 26 5 1/2" flues; see Locobase 8396. Obviously any trace of the original Vanderbilt boiler had by that time been eradicated.

The small class lasted until 1929-1938.


Class 498 - superheated (Locobase 8396)

Data from AT&SF 9 -1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema .

Locobase 4150 shows the first stage in this design's lifetime as it hit the rails in 1901 as a balanced compound with a saturated boiler and the underperforming Vanderbilt firebox. In 1911, the compounding arrangement was replaced by 2 simple-expansion cylinders supplied by Walschaert radial valve gear. At a later date, the shops remade the locomotives by installing a very useful amount of superheating. The last of these was withdrawn in 1938.


Class 5/395 (Locobase 8987)

Data from AT&SF 9 -1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 13, p. 138. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema. Works numbers were 8348, 8352, 8356 in January 1887.

This threesome of Ten-wheelers came to the CS in the mid-80s. Their specifications called for 227 tubes. It's likely that the bottom row of tubes was later removed because they were too low to maintain. Also the wheelbase was specified as 25 ft 11 1/2" while the Santa Fe diagram shows three more inches.

Although this Barstow-to-San Diego subsidiary of the Santa Fe remained aloof from the mid-1880s consolidation of lines into the California Central, that railroad, the Redondo Beach, and the CS were united in November 1889 as the Southern California. At this time, the 5-7 became the 51-53. 17 years later, the Santa Fe bought the SC outright, two years after the Santa Fe began buying the engines in June 1904. They joined the

Over time, the Barstow line has served the Santa Fe as its last leg into the California coast.


Class 547 / 317 (Locobase 8237)

Data from AT&SF 7 -1901 and 9 - 1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema.

This class was very similar to the Baldwin engines that were supplied a year earlier, but had larger boilers and smaller fireboxes. The last 10 of the 317 class had 2 more 2" tubes of very slightly shorter length for the same tube heating surface area (it says here ...); for an alternate view, see Locobase 8238


Class 592 (Locobase 8240)

Data from AT&SF 7 -1901 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema .

This small set of Schenectadies was delivered over a two-year period. They operated on the Santa Fe for almost 30 years, the last retiring in 1925.


Class 592 (Locobase 11126)

Data from Schenectady Locomotive Works, Illustrated Catalogue of Simple and Compound Locomotives (Philadelphia: J B Lippincott, 1897), pp. 90-91.

Two other Santa Fe classes (Locobase 8239 and 8243) had similar grate areas and cylinder volumes, but both of them rolled on passenger-size drivers. The 592 differed also in having the larger 2 1/4" tubes.


Class 653 / 325 (Locobase 8238)

Data from AT&SF 7 -1901 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema .

As noted in Locobase 8237, which covers the first 20 locomotives in this class of Manchester Ten-wheelers, the last 10 engines delivered to the Santa Fe had two more boiler tubes, but no increase in tube heating surface area. This class was very similar to the Baldwin engines that were supplied a year earlier, but had larger boilers and smaller fireboxes.


Class 683/2160 (Locobase 8235)

Data from AT&SF 7 -1901 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 14, p. 118. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema .Works numbers were 9137-9139, 9141, 9145-9148, 9151, 9154 in March 1888; 9159, 9163-9165, 9169-9171, 9174-9176, 9192-9198, 9200-9202 in April; 9224, 9226-9228, 9230-9232, 9234-9235, 9243 in May.

The high numbers of this large class puzzle Locobase, but since the Santa Fe renumbered its locomotives twice in two years, he isn't surprised. Although they retained the same long stroke/bore ratio, this class differed from the 18 locomotives delivered by Baldwin a year or two earlier (Locobase 8236) in the reduction in boiler-tube diameter from 2 1/4" to 2". Locobase can't figure why that change was made, but notes that the heating surface area decreased by almost 200 sq ft. The grate also shrank.

The last of these Ten-wheelers was withdrawn in 1929. Most were scrapped but works 9146was sold in April 1925 to the Wichita Northwestern in Kansas as its 8. It was probably scrapped when the WN closed in 1941.


Class 7 / 699 / 389 (Locobase 8985)

Data from AT&SF 9 -1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema.

The H & S took delivery of a pair locomotives from Manchester (works #1687-1688); a year later the Santa Fe took over the H & S. The firebox heating surface was adequate, but the design's grate area seems meager.

By 1920, the two were substantially different in size and the 390's larger dimensions are shown in 8986. Both were scrapped in 1922.


Class 8 / 700 / 390 (Locobase 8986)

Data from AT&SF 9 -1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema.

By 1920, the two Hutchinson & Southern locomotives described in Locobase 8985 were property of the Santa Fe and has different dimensions that included taller drivers. If the grate seemed small in the original design, increasing the number of boiler tubes only increased the disparity. Both were scrapped in 1922


Class 8/412 (Locobase 8988)

Data from AT&SF 9 - 1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema. See also DeGolyer, Volume 13, p. 139. Works numbers were 8393, 8397 in February 1887; 8517, 8520, 8522-8524 in April 1887.

Other than the grate, everything about this more numerous set of Ten-wheelers was bigger than the trio that went to the CS a year earlier (Locobase 8987). The big change was in the cylinder volume with cylinders measuring 2" (50.8 mm) longer in stroke. The boiler held nine more tubes (total of 236), but, like the 5s, these engine lost six of the tubes later.

Only the 416 was scrapped in the 'teens (September 1914). The rest were dismantled in 1921 (415), 1922 (414), 1924 (413, 416), 418 (1929), and finally 412 (1929).


Class 833/439 (Locobase 8243)

Data from AT&SF 7 -1901 and 9 - 1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 22, p. 127. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema. Baldwin works numbers were 16731-16735 in May 1899, 16965-16969 in August, and 17282-17286 in December.

Like many of the Baldwin engines built for the Santa Fe in this era, the 833 was a stocky locomotive with an oddly coned boiler ahead of the steam dome. It had a cast steel frame. The heating surface specs from the 1899 Baldwin specs. Santa Fe's 1920 diagram shows a boiler with one more tube and 40 more sq ft of heating surface area; not sure how that figures.

Except for the 444, which was scrapped by 1905, most of this class was retired in the 1930s


Class 866/445/0216 (Locobase 8224)

Data from AT&SF 7 -1901 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 19, p 71. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema. Works numbers were 13929, 13931, 13933-13939, 13947 in January 1894.

Part of a continuing series of small, relatively light Ten-wheelers of modest power, this 10-set was carried on the main Santa Fe roster at first, but soon went to subsidiary Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe and were renumbered 401-410.

The G C & SF motive power was amalgamated with the Santa Fe's stock a few years later and these were renumbered first as 445-454, then in 1900 as 0216-0225. (Note: 0216 originally was the last of the Baldwins to be delivered - the others were renumbered in sequence.) The firebox heating surface area was later measured at 146 sq ft (13.57 sq m) and evaporative heating surface area at 1,471 sq ft (136.71 sqm). Weight estimates of 83,000 lb on the drivers and 108,000 lb for the engine were obviously way off, or the locomotives were substantially rebuilt.

Most were scrapped by the Santa Fe beginning in 1915 and ending in 1922, but the Artesian Belt bought 0225 in December 1916. In 1920 the AB sold the engine to the SAn Antonio Southern. In 1917, Border Equipment Company bought both the 0217 and the 0223.


Class Atlantic/21 (Locobase 8646)

Data from StLSF 1904 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 5, p. 132. Works numbers were 2177-2178 in June 1870 and 2302-2304 in December.

The A & P bought these five wood-burning Ten-wheelers from Baldwin in two batches. Each had a name: Atlantic (21), Pacific (22), Uriel Crocker (31), Andrew V. Stout (32), and Isaac Rich (33). As laid out in the specifications, these engines were to have 135 2 1/4" tubes. Their length was not given, so Locobase can't determine if they lost heating surface area by adopting the later tube configuration.

Bankruptcy stemming from the Panic of 1873 resulted in the A & P conveying all five in 1876 to the St Louis-San Francisco.

The Frisco kept them for several decades.

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class11 / 142 (2)1 / 24211/2/26010/2421
Locobase ID8982 8906 8395 8980 2980
RailroadSan Francisco & San Joaquin Valley (ATSF)Nevada Southern (ATSF)Santa Fe Prescott & Phoenix (ATSF)Randsburg (ATSF)Prescott & Eastern (ATSF)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class71913
Road Numbers1-7/308--3141 / 1421-9 / 2421-24291/2/26011-12, 10/2431-2432, 2430
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built71913
BuilderBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoBrooksSBrooks
Year18951893189319001898
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft)12131212.3712
Engine Wheelbase (ft)23.1923.8321.7523.5421.83
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.52 0.55 0.55 0.53 0.55
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)50.945248.9251.1148.90
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)
Weight on Drivers (lbs)100,00095,200106,800109,000106,000
Engine Weight (lbs)130,000123,720130,800145,000130,000
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)80,00098,00080,000101,100
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)210,000228,800225,000231,100
Tender Water Capacity (gals)40005200457640004500
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons)82416 6.502416
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)5653596159
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)5757576356
Boiler Pressure (psi)165160175190180
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)19" x 24"19" x 26"19" x 24"20" x 26"19" x 24"
Tractive Effort (lbs)21,31822,39522,61026,66023,671
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.69 4.25 4.72 4.09 4.48
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)153.50141.44156164.80142
Grate Area (sq ft)2524.7024.3031.4024
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)19051534162219651606
Superheating Surface (sq ft)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)19051534162219651606
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume241.88179.79205.95207.85203.92
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation41253952425359664320
Same as above plus superheater percentage41253952425359664320
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area25,32822,63027,30031,31225,560
Power L153193993507058854940
Power MT351.79277.41313.97357.09308.23

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class100/643/28312 / 14313/219814 / 2433141
Locobase ID8981 8907 8236 8893 8905
RailroadAtlantic & Pacific (ATSF)Gulf, Beaumont & Kansas City (ATSF)Chicago, Kansas & Western (ATSF)Santa Fe Prescott & Phoenix (ATSF)Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe (ATSF)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class2531731
Road Numbers100-124/643-667/283-30712-14 / 143-1452198-221614-16 /2433-2435141
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built2531731
BuilderBurnham, Williams & CoCookeBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoAlco-BrooksPittsburgh
Year18931900188719031895
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft)1314.3314.501210.92
Engine Wheelbase (ft)23.8324.7126.2122.3721.31
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.55 0.58 0.55 0.54 0.51
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)5147.7150.5048.94
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)33,600
Weight on Drivers (lbs)100,30086,40089,900113,60084,000
Engine Weight (lbs)120,450114,300120,100143,600109,000
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)98,25093,50070,000111,60090,500
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)218,700207,800190,100255,200199,500
Tender Water Capacity (gals)40005200368050003700
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons)7 6.5025001847
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)5648506347
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)6161586357
Boiler Pressure (psi)170160150190175
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)19" x 24"18" x 24"19" x 28"19.5" x 26"18" x 24"
Tractive Effort (lbs)20,52417,33722,22025,34420,293
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.89 4.98 4.05 4.48 4.14
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)155135.30164146132.50
Grate Area (sq ft)24.7018.4020.7024.3022
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)15501543192517951567
Superheating Surface (sq ft)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)15501543192517951567
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume196.81218.29209.50199.73221.69
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation41992944310546173850
Same as above plus superheater percentage41992944310546173850
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area26,35021,64824,60027,74023,188
Power L151025108433256055244
Power MT336.43391.01318.70326.33412.89

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class1421511581722/90/464
Locobase ID8225 8231 8232 8896 8992
RailroadSanta Fe (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)Santa Fe Prescott & Phoenix (ATSF)California Southern (ATSF)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class8165544
Road Numbers142-149151-57, 192-97, 219-200158-91, 198-21817-2022-25/90-93/464-467
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built8165544
BuilderRhode IslandBrooksBrooksseveralBurnham, Williams & Co
Year18901891189118901894
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft)14.4215.17161615
Engine Wheelbase (ft)24.9225.3726.0426.0226
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.58 0.60 0.61 0.61 0.58
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)47.2548.2548.2550.67
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)28,00033,10033,100
Weight on Drivers (lbs)80,40096,50088,40088,400119,900
Engine Weight (lbs)105,900125,100122,400122,900149,900
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)73,40070,70072,50097,29690,850
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)179,300195,800194,900220,196240,750
Tender Water Capacity (gals)34605000374046656000
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons)5652006
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)4554494967
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)5863636357
Boiler Pressure (psi)150180180175180
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)18" x 24"18" x 24"18" x 24"18" x 24"20" x 28"
Tractive Effort (lbs)17,09418,88518,88518,36030,063
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.70 5.11 4.68 4.81 3.99
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)139145145145180
Grate Area (sq ft)19.20181817.9024.10
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)14701492156015611994
Superheating Surface (sq ft)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)14701492156015611994
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume207.96211.07220.69220.84195.85
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation28803240324031334338
Same as above plus superheater percentage28803240324031334338
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area20,85026,10026,10025,37532,400
Power L144415928611059434861
Power MT365.33406.29457.13444.64268.14

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class2212462562613/0226
Locobase ID8230 8233 8234 8226 8399
RailroadSanta Fe (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)Crosbyton-South Plains (ATSF)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class25105201
Road Numbers221-245246-255856-860 / 256-259261-2803/0226
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built25105201
BuilderSchenectadyRichmondBurnham, Williams & CoSchenectadyBaldwin
Year18911894189418881913
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft)1615.1715.171111.33
Engine Wheelbase (ft)26.0825.4225.4621.2923.17
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.61 0.60 0.60 0.52 0.49
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)47.5047.8348.0146.7052.29
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)31,25032,05032,40031,900
Weight on Drivers (lbs)86,60094,70095,00087,40097,500
Engine Weight (lbs)119,100124,700127,000113,750125,300
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)73,60082,00085,00077,40099,800
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)192,700206,700212,000191,150225,100
Tender Water Capacity (gals)35984835410039285000
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons)66 6.5068
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)4853534954
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)6363565857
Boiler Pressure (psi)180180180150180
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)18" x 24"18" x 24"18" x 24"18" x 26"18" x 26"
Tractive Effort (lbs)18,88518,88521,24518,51822,612
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.59 5.01 4.47 4.72 4.31
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)128147132.66118.60152
Grate Area (sq ft)17.6017.901826.8022.40
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)16031535153116351717
Superheating Surface (sq ft)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)16031535153116351717
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume226.78217.16216.59213.51224.22
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation31683222324040204032
Same as above plus superheater percentage31683222324040204032
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area23,04026,46023,87917,79027,360
Power L159976070521542195531
Power MT458.01423.93363.07319.27375.19

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class348/760/315354400406419
Locobase ID8983 8241 8984 8239 8989
RailroadSanta Fe (ATSF)Santa Fe Pacific (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class6356610
Road Numbers348, 353, 349-352/315-316, 391-394354-388400-405406-411419-428
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built6356610
BuilderBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoPittsburghSchenectadyBrooksDickson
Year18861887189018901899
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft)14.5011.8312.5015.5015
Engine Wheelbase (ft)2622.1722.9225.6725.25
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.56 0.53 0.55 0.60 0.59
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)48.4249.8348.5650.5851.25
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)
Weight on Drivers (lbs)80,00095,45099,000102,200123,700
Engine Weight (lbs)110,000117,150131,000151,300
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)100,20084,25090,00090,00092,300
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)210,200201,400221,000243,600
Tender Water Capacity (gals)50004000500050004650
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons)67662232
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)4453555769
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)5851636969
Boiler Pressure (psi)150155180180180
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)19" x 26"19" x 26"19" x 26"19" x 26"19.5" x 28"
Tractive Effort (lbs)20,63324,24722,79520,81223,609
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.88 3.94 4.34 4.91 5.24
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)142.50158.50142162149
Grate Area (sq ft)20.2024.7028.2028.6024.80
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)18971644157720121843
Superheating Surface (sq ft)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)18971644157720121843
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume222.34192.68184.83235.81190.42
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation30303829507651484464
Same as above plus superheater percentage30303829507651484464
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area21,37524,56825,56029,16026,820
Power L144353762506668475535
Power MT366.66260.67338.44443.10295.94

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class429 Klondike43745446849/281
Locobase ID8242 2792 8990 8227 4887
RailroadSanta Fe (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)Atlantic & Pacific (ATSF)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class8210302
Road Numbers429-436437-438454-463468-49749, 51/281-282
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built82302
BuilderDicksonSanta FeATSFRhode IslandBurnham, Parry, Williams & Co
Year18971900190419001886
Valve GearStephensonWalschaertStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft)1514.501514.2513.50
Engine Wheelbase (ft)25.1725.3325.3324.9225.96
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.60 0.57 0.59 0.57 0.52
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)50.8051.7852.8047.2547.25
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)43,70044,00042,450
Weight on Drivers (lbs)125,300127,000123,000125,00085,400
Engine Weight (lbs)150,500169,000158,000162,200114,500
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)92,00090,00098,00099,80053,500
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)242,500259,000256,000262,000168,000
Tender Water Capacity (gals)46505000400055004000
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons)65 6.509
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)7071686947
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)7377736758.50
Boiler Pressure (psi)180200180200140
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)19.5" x 28"14" x 28"20" x 26"20" x 28"19" x 24"
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)24" x 28"
Tractive Effort (lbs)22,31518,08021,79728,41817,624
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 5.62 7.02 5.64 4.40 4.85
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)157.30168166175112
Grate Area (sq ft)2526.5028.603016.80
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)22061915214823131356
Superheating Surface (sq ft)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)22061915214823131356
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume227.93383.87227.21227.19172.17
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation45005300514860002352
Same as above plus superheater percentage45005300514860002352
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area28,31433,60029,88035,00015,680
Power L167714823689969933321
Power MT357.40251.17370.97370.01257.20

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class498498 - superheated5/395547 / 317592
Locobase ID4150 8396 8987 8237 8240
RailroadSanta Fe (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)California Southern (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class556206
Road Numbers498-502498-5025-7/51-53/397, 395-96547-566593-596, 592/808-809, 805-807/348-353
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built56206
BuilderBurnham, Williams & CoSanta FeBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoManchesterSchenectady
Year19011920188618871887
Valve GearStephensonWalschaertStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft)14.5014.5014.5014.4212
Engine Wheelbase (ft)26.5826.5826.2125.5422.27
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.55 0.55 0.55 0.56 0.54
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)56.4056.7148.6247.79
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)48,62028,900
Weight on Drivers (lbs)153,830144,26085,60084,700100,400
Engine Weight (lbs)194,720189,600119,600112,300121,200
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)120,000120,00090,85079,30067,000
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)314,720309,600210,450191,600188,200
Tender Water Capacity (gals)6000600038504000
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons)200022506
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)8580484756
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)6966585859
Boiler Pressure (psi)200190140150160
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)15" x 28"23" x 28"18.5" x 26"19" x 26"19" x 26"
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)26" x 28"
Tractive Effort (lbs)23,29136,24518,25720,63321,636
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 6.60 3.98 4.69 4.11 4.64
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)177146.50148137143.20
Grate Area (sq ft)50.5019.5018.9028
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)29882131185416971790
Superheating Surface (sq ft)523
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)29882654185416971790
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume521.75158.27229.20198.90209.80
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation9595273028354480
Same as above plus superheater percentage11,514273028354480
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area35,40033,40220,72020,55022,912
Power L1517711,751434040484621
Power MT222.58538.75335.33316.09304.41

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class592653 / 325683/21607 / 699 / 3898 / 700 / 390
Locobase ID11,126 8238 8235 8985 8986
RailroadSanta Fe (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)Hutchison & Southern (ATSF)Hutchison & Southern (ATSF)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class1194021
Road Numbers592653-662 / 325, 340-348683-722/703-740/2160-97, 2216-22177/ 699 / 3898 / 700 / 390
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built119402
BuilderSchenectadyManchesterBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoManchesterManchester
Year18901887188818981898
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft)121514.501515
Engine Wheelbase (ft)22.2525.5026.4025.5025.50
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.54 0.59 0.55 0.59 0.59
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)47.7550.0448.8748.87
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)25,80030,300
Weight on Drivers (lbs)97,00080,40089,80099,30099,300
Engine Weight (lbs)119,000114,900124,000131,500131,500
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)75,10071,10087,50087,500
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)190,000195,100219,000219,000
Tender Water Capacity (gals)3600368037003700
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons) 6.5099
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)5445505555
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)6058585963
Boiler Pressure (psi)150150150185185
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)19" x 26"19" x 26"19" x 28"19" x 26"19" x 26"
Tractive Effort (lbs)19,94520,63322,22025,01623,428
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.86 3.90 4.04 3.97 4.24
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)135.44155147153152
Grate Area (sq ft)28.6018.801718.5018.50
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)19091720174619772226
Superheating Surface (sq ft)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)19091720174619772226
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume223.74201.59190.02231.71260.90
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation42902820255034233423
Same as above plus superheater percentage42902820255034233423
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area20,31623,25022,05028,30528,120
Power L145474240391558466798
Power MT310.03348.79288.34389.37452.78

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class8/412833/439866/445/0216Atlantic/21
Locobase ID8988 8243 8224 8646
RailroadCalifornia Southern (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)Santa Fe (ATSF)Atlantic & Pacific (ATSF)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class715105
Road Numbers17, 8-10, 14-16/66, 60-65/412-418833-847/439-453866-875/446-454, 445/0216-022521-22/655-58/2655,57
GaugeStdStdStdStd
Number Built715105
BuilderBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoM. Baird & Co
Year1887190018941870
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft)14.501514.2513.33
Engine Wheelbase (ft)25.9625.332523.75
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.56 0.59 0.57 0.56
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)52.7247.2545.46
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)52,90019,000
Weight on Drivers (lbs)89,500123,00095,50055,826
Engine Weight (lbs)126,600158,000121,95080,355
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)90,85098,00084,90072,300
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)217,450256,000206,850152,655
Tender Water Capacity (gals)4250600041004000
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons) 7.50 6.508
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)50685331
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)57695855
Boiler Pressure (psi)150180160135
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)19" x 28"20" x 26"17" x 24"18" x 24"
Tractive Effort (lbs)22,61023,06116,26416,224
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.96 5.33 5.87 3.44
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)15516714087.75
Grate Area (sq ft)19.3028.6018.2015
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)1966210914571264
Superheating Surface (sq ft)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)1966210914571264
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume213.96223.08231.09178.82
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation2895514829122025
Same as above plus superheater percentage2895514829122025
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area23,25030,06022,40011,846
Power L14251644652912981
Power MT314.14346.61366.43353.17

Reference


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