Birmingham & Southeastern / Bloomsburg & Sullivan / Buffalo & Susquehanna / Bullfrog Syndicate 4-6-0 "Ten-wheeler" Locomotives of the USA


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class 108 (Locobase 12096)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Volume 19, p.60. Works number was 13879 in December 1893.

Short-coupled Ten-wheeler that faced grades of 400 ft to the mile (just shy of 8%!) and 22 -deg curves (about 180 ft radius). Although sold to the Sinnemahoning Valley, the engine's tender was lettered for its successor. Renumbered 3 times, the 102 was sold to the Wellsville & Buffalo in December 1915.

The W & B retained the 102 for less than a year before selling it to locomotive rebuilder/reseller Southern Iron & Equipment. 102's final venue was the A L Clark Lumber Company. Locobase suspects that the boiler-pressure setting had been considerably reduced by that time.


Class 110 (Locobase 12107)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Volume 19, p 110. Works number was 14017 in May 1894.

Here it was, 6 months after the 108 had been turned out (Locobase 12096) and its new stablemate's works number was barely 130 higher. Tough year after the worst panic to hit Wall Street in decades took down the economy. Even the locomotive was a touch smaller and less powerful. It was to take 2 1/2% grades and snake around 22-deg curves (about 55 metres) while anticipating that 15-deg (77-m) curves would be "usual".

The 110 served the B & S for many years, however, before being sold in December 1916 to the Motley County Road Company (or Railway) in Texas. The MCR never grew more than its original 8 miles between the town of Matador and the junction with the Quanah, Acme & Pacific. In 1927, the QA & P took over the MC R and this Ten-wheeler went with it.


Class 111 (Locobase 12108)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Volume 19, p 113. Works number was 14018 in May 1894.

Immediately following the 110 (Locobase 12107) was this freight Ten-wheeler which had a bigger boiler (chiefly by enlarging the barrel and putting more tubes in) and somewhat bigger firebox on smaller drivers. Like the 110, it was to be capable of handling a 2 1/2% grade and 20-deg (58-m) curves, although 16-deg curves were to be seen as "usual".

After a 20-year career with the B & S, the 111 went to the Wellsville & Buffalo in December 1915. Its tenure lasted less than a year before it was sold to locomotive rebuilder/reseller Southern Iron & Equipment. A year later, SI & E had delivered 111 sto the Gennessee & Wyoming as their 14. Four years later, the G & W sold the now-clapped-out 14 to the Arcade & Attica, which operated it as their #4 for only 2 years before scrapping it.


Class 5 (Locobase 12748)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Volume 27, p. 182 and Vol 43, p. 180. See description of the B&S at http://www.bentonnews.net/Features/B&Stour.htm, last accessed 22 June 2011. Works numbers were 24985 in January 1905, 27262 in January 1906, and 39396 in March 1913.

This set of modestly powered Ten-wheelers operated on a short line that boasted 5% grades and 16-degree (236-ft radius) curves. The 30-mile B & S ran in Columbia County in the Susquehanna River watershed east of Williamsport, Pennsylvania. By the time the 5 and 6 arrived in 1905-1906, the line had been open for almost 20 years. While never profitable, it maintained a freight and passenger business from Bloomsburg to Jamison City. JC's sawmill, which converted the lumber extracted from forests nearby to products shipped down to Bloomsburg and beyond, was a key factor in the line's viability and its closure in 1912 prompted the slow decline. Closing the tannery in JC in 1925 proved the terminal blow.

Over the eight-year period of the class's delivery, the only significant change was the use of larger tender (3,500 gallons, 6 tons of fuel) that weighed 70,000 lb (31,751 kg).

5 remained on the B & S until its sale to the Reading and subsequent closing in 1928, after which it was scrapped.

6 followed a more circuitous route to its 1929 scrapping, being sold first to locomotive rebuilder/reseller Southern Iron & Equipment in 1927, then being sold through locomotive rebuilder/reseller Birmingham Rail & Locomotive on 27 May 1927, which on the same day sold it to the Bennettsville & Cheraw in South Carolina. The B & C operated the 6 for less than two years before selling it back to SI & E, which scrapped it.

8 also was sold to SI & E in June 1929. Apparently SI & E involved Baldwin in some way in selling the engine in July 1931, its buyer being the Minneapolis, Red Lake & Manitoba. See Locobase 12750 for a short description of this railway.


Class 5, 1, 13 (Locobase 11973)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Volume 27, p. 196

Works numbers were 25234-25235, 25269 in March 1905; 29726-29727 in December 1906.

The syndicate bought the same Ten-wheeler design for three different Nevada railroads. Ther first two went to the Tonopah as their 5-6, the third to the Goldfield as its #1. These three were combined into one class (numbered 11, 12, 10, respectively) when the Tonopah merged with the Goldfield in November 1905. They didn't enjoy very long service lives, possibly because a mixed-traffic Ten-wheeler wasn't really suited to the ore traffic that dominated the road. 11 was retired in 1917, 12 in 1923, and 10 in 1926.

A year and a half after those engines were produced, the last two arrived on the Bullfrog & Goldfield as 13-14. These had more tumultuous careers, 13 being wrecked in August 1908, while 14 (renumbered 12 in 1908) suffered a boiler explosion on 19 December 1910.

Both were rebuilt and sold. 13 was rebuilt and renumbered 11 in 1909 and went to the Northwestern Pacific as 178; it was scrapped in 1954. 12 journeyed to the San Diego & Arizona (Eastern) as #20 and later superheated; see Locobase 7276.


Class 61 (Locobase 14111)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works datacard as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 47, p. 262. See also entry at the Mississippi Rails site at http://www.msrailroads.com/B&SE.htm. Works number was 39485 in March 1913 and 40310 in August.

Chartered in 1901 as the Union Springs & Northern, this Alabama shortline was renamed on 26 April 1911. A year later the B&SE bought the Tallassee & Montgomery.

Its main line ran from Union Springs to Eclectic, Ala. over 48 miles of "gently rolling" country on 60 lb/yard (30 kg/metre). About 1/4 of the mileage was laid on "relay" rail (rail too worn for the Class I road on which it had originally been laid, but still had service life left). The last section (Tallassee to Eclectic) was completed in June 1912.

These small Ten-wheelers were the first engines bought new for the B&SE; they cost $10,452 each. 61 was scrapped in 1937 and 63 in 1939.


Class 7 (Locobase 12749)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Volume 34, p. 191. Works number was 34810 in June 1910.

Apparently the B & S needed a Ten-wheeler better suited for mixed-traffic service than the 1905-1906 freighters described in Locobase 12748. So it ordered this slightly different engine with 6" taller drivers and longer boiler tubes.

A year before the Reading sale, the 7 was sold to locomotive rebuilder/reseller Birmingham Rail & Locomotive. BR & L found a new owner in the Bennettsville & Cheraw of South Carolina, which bought the engine on 27 May 1927. The B & C operated the 7 until sometime in the late 1930s-early 1940s.

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class10811011155, 1, 13
Locobase ID12,096 12,107 12,108 12,748 11,973
RailroadBuffalo & SusquehannaBuffalo & SusquehannaBuffalo & SusquehannaBloomsburg & SullivanBullfrog Syndicate
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class11125
Road Numbers108 / 122 / 151 / 102110 / 123 / 153 / 108111 / 124 / 154 / 1045-6, 85-6, 1, 13-14
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built11125
BuilderBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & Co
Year18931894189419051905
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft)10.6710.6710.671012.67
Engine Wheelbase (ft)21212120.1524
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.51 0.51 0.51 0.50 0.53
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)
Weight on Drivers (lbs)95,00086,00078,000133,500
Engine Weight (lbs)120,000110,000100,000170,000
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)60,000
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)160,000
Tender Water Capacity (gals)40004000400030007000
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons)13
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)53484374
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)5555.50495663
Boiler Pressure (psi)200175175200180
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)19" x 24"18" x 24"19" x 24"16" x 24"21" x 28"
Tractive Effort (lbs)26,78020,84126,30118,65129,988
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.55 4.13 4.18 4.45
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)128.72125143.27123.20192
Grate Area (sq ft)18.1020.8022.1019.7234.90
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)17321600174712552502
Superheating Surface (sq ft)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)17321600174712552502
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume219.91226.35221.82224.71222.90
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation36203640386839446282
Same as above plus superheater percentage36203640386839446282
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area25,74421,87525,07224,64034,560
Power L155305095447062535829
Power MT385.00391.83530.21288.78

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class617
Locobase ID14,111 12,749
RailroadBirmingham & SoutheasternBloomsburg & Sullivan
CountryUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-0
Number in Class21
Road Numbers61, 637
GaugeStdStd
Number Built21
BuilderBaldwinBaldwin
Year19131910
Valve GearStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft)1111
Engine Wheelbase (ft)21.2521.25
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.52 0.52
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)47.08
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)
Weight on Drivers (lbs)84,00079,000
Engine Weight (lbs)108,000101,000
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)70,00070,000
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)178,000171,000
Tender Water Capacity (gals)35003500
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons)6
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)4744
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)6062
Boiler Pressure (psi)170200
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)17" x 24"16" x 24"
Tractive Effort (lbs)16,70416,846
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 5.03 4.69
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)110106.30
Grate Area (sq ft)19.7019.70
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)13701273
Superheating Surface (sq ft)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)13701273
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume217.29227.93
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation33493940
Same as above plus superheater percentage33493940
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area18,70021,260
Power L151776677
Power MT407.62559.00


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