Bellingham Bay & British Columbia / Idaho & Washington Northern / Milwaukee Road / Southern Indiana / Tacoma Eastern 4-6-0 "Ten-wheeler" Locomotives of the USA


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class 10 / G6-k (Locobase 11505)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Vol 26, p. 227. Works numbers were 23682 in February 1904, 26638 in October 1905, and 28486 in June 1906.

Months after the TE ordered #11 (Locobase 11504), it went back to Baldwin for another, bigger Ten-wheeler and returned in subsequent years for another 2. Once the USRA allowed the Milwaukee to absorb the railroad that it had effectively owned (through stock purchases) since 1901 and leased since 1909, the 3 locomotives were grouped into Class G6-k.

Idaho Logging bought the 2334 in November 1926 and renumbered it #4. The other two were scrapped in November and December of 1932, respectively.


Class 11 / G2-c (Locobase 11504)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines, 1903, as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Vol 26, p. 235. Works number was 23673 in February 1904.

This was a relatively small Ten-wheeler that nevertheless migrated to the Milwaukee Road when the USRA oversaw that railroad's ultimate absorption of the Paradise Valley Route. It endured on the Milwaukee until it was scrapped in March 1931.


Class 11 / G6-d (Locobase 13161)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 30, p. 264. See also MILWRD 1930s Locomotive Diagrams supplied by Allen Stanley in May 2005 from his extensive Raildata collection. Locobase 9892 for a description of the I & WN. Works numbers were 31269-31270 in July 1907.

Locobase notes that the ratio between grate area and heating surface is no error of data entry - it really is 1 to 136. (60-80 was considered a desirable range.). The firebox shown in the diagram is only 32 1/4" wide so it could fit between the frames. It also dropped between the two rear driving axles. This was 19th-Century practice and not at all common in new locomotives of the time.

Gene Connelly's individual entries for this pair credits them with 19" cylinders and 63" drivers, but the Milwaukee Road diagram book confirms both the cylinder and driver diameters shown in the specs.

The Milwaukee Road created a separate subclass for the pair after its 1916 absorption of the I & WN. 2174 was scrapped in November 1934 and 2713 went to the ferro-knacker a month later.


Class 15 / G6-e (Locobase 13162)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 30, p. 265. See Locobase 9892 for a description of the I & WN. Works numbers were 31648 in September 1907, 32119 in November, and 32764 in April 1908.

Following on the heels of the two over-boilered Ten-wheelers shown in Locobase 13161, this trio of 4-6-0s had more cylinder volume and taller drivers. Grate area also was considerably bigger, thanks to its positioning above the frame and driving axles. The firebox remained quite small.

The class rolled into the Milwaukee Road in 1916 and received new numbers and its own class ID. 2715 and 2717 were scrapped in March 1935 and 2716 went in April of the same year.


Class 21 / G4-f (Locobase 12268)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Vol 21, p.167 . Works numbers were 15888-15891 in April 1898, 16017-16019 in June.

The Southern Indiana had an independent existence until it was bought by the Chicago, Terre Haute & Southeastern in 1910. The CTH & SE renumbered the class and kept it in service until the Chicago, Milwaukee, St Paul & Pacific leased the road for 999 years in 1921. (As this was written, the lease still had 909 years to go but the Milwaukee was long since demised.)

These small Ten-wheelers had cabs lettered Bedford Route

The Milwaukee renumbered the first 4, but kept only 3; 2180, 2183, 2184 were scrapped in June, August, and September of 1930, respectively. 2181 was sold to the Shearwood Railway and 2182 went to the Deering Southwestern in 1925.

306-307 were not renumbered by the Milwaukee. 305 was sold to the Tabor & Northern in Tabor, Iowa in 1921, was sold by the T & N to locomotive rebuilder/reseller Southern Iron & Equipment in 1924, and wound up on the Arkansas Railroad in 1925. As ARR #8, the engine put in nearly another 3 decades on the line.

307 was put to a different kind of work, first by the Croker Chair Company (Sheboygan, Wisc) and later by the Yawkey Bissell Lumber Company (Arbor Vitae, Wisc) before being scrapped sometime in the 1930s.


Class 31 / G5-e (Locobase 11559)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines, 1903, as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Vol 26, p. 23. Works numbers were 22641, 22650, 22651 in August 1903; 22921, 22934, 22938, 22989, 22997 in October; 23118, 23122 in November.

This railroad was well placed to attract suitors as it served the coal fields in Indiana and Ohio. Within a few years after the delivery of this set of Ten-wheeler freighters, the IS was merged with the Chicago Southern in 1910; the result was the Chicago, Terre Haute & Southeastern and the class was renumbered.

When the Milwaukee Road leased the CTH & SE for 999 years in 1921, they renumbered the class again and operated them until 1934.


Class 9/G5-c (Locobase 11365)

Data from "Equipment and Supplies: Locomotive Building, Railway Age, Vol 44 (6 December 1907), p. 819. Works number was 32348 in December 1907.

Sold to the BB & BC, the locomotive rolled into the Bellingham & Northern when that railroad took over the purchasing line. The Milwaukee Road bought the B & N in 1914 and gave the 9 its own class.

It was scrapped in December 1927.


Class B1 (Locobase 9857)

Data from Milwaukee Road 1930 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 20, p. 65 and Volume 21, p. 53. Baldwin works numbers were 14581-14590 in December 1895 and 15465-15468 in August 1897.

A production series of Ten-wheelers using the Vauclain compounding system of one piston valve on each side of the boiler supplying steam to its set of one HP & one LP cylinder in a single assembly. The valve diameters were a relatively capacious 11 1/2" (292 mm). Boilers in the first ten held 186 tubes; the last four had 184 tubes. This class followed by a few years the original 827, which is shown in Locobase 10800.

Locobase 16170 shows the class after it was rebuilt in 1914 as 19"x 26" simple-expansion, superheated engines.


Class B1/G-5xs - compound (Locobase 10800)

Data from "Compound Locomotives", Angus Sinclair (ed), Report of proceedings of the 25th annual convention of the American Railway Master Mechanics Association, 20 June 1892, pp. 19-73; DeGolyer, Volume 17, p.187; and MIWRD 1930ca Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works number was 12419 in January 1892.

Not quite two years after the first Vauclain compound started tests on the Baltimore & Ohio, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, in conjunction with the ARMMA, joined the legion of railroads in testing the four-cylinder design against an identical locomotive fitted with simple-expansion cylinders. (See Locobase 10799 for the 822's data.).

George Gibbs's report noted that both the railroad and the builder fully cooperated in this set of trials over a running ground selected to provide "an example of a road through an undulating country, having moderately heavy grades to tax the hauling power of the engines, as well as level stretches where their speed capabilities could be tried." The trains consisted of mixed freight classes in both directions, the westbound trains being more lightly loaded,the eastbounds being made up with "compact and heavy" consists.

As run, both engines had new boilers and no scale buildup was permitted. The 827 suffered from "considerable trouble" in slight leakage of the piston valve rings. The condition didn't materially influence the coal and water consumption rates.

The compound's cylinders had 26" strokes, which matched those of the 822 and which didn't affect the compounding ratio of 2.78. One hitch became apparent when it was clear that the compound simply wasn't as powerful as the simple-expansion engine when the safety valve was set at 180 psi. Baldwin explained that it had built the compound to carry 200 psi, "clearly a misunderstanding", commented Gibbs,"of the Committees' wishes in the matter, which were to have all the conditions as far as possible identical.

To compensate, both engines were run alternately at 180 and 200 psi. Now it was time for the 822 to suffer as it was not designed to make full use of 200 psi steam and in trying to found trouble with the valves running dry. Point to the compound, in which "this defect did not appear, as the piston valve used is very perfectly balanced."

Test results demonstrated "the nice working conditions for which economy in compound engines depends, and also the poor results which may be obtained by a careless engineer." See pp. 45-46 for a discussion of the common crosshead wracking attributable to those times the LP cylinder generated more force than the HP cylinder on that side.

On the other hand, the compound came into its own at higher revolutions (150 and 240 rpm) in the evenness of its rotative pressures compared not only to the simple-expansion locomotive, but also a Schenectady-built two-cylinder cross-compound.

Keeping in mind the qualities of the two coals used (a hard Pittsburgh bituminous and a softer Braceville coal), the committee said that average gains in economy over a year's operation would be predicted as 16.9% in coal consumption, 14.1% water consumption.

(This was consistent with other test results on other railroads.) Perhaps tellingly, the best compound performance came when burning Braceville coal, when the four-cylinder setup's softer exhaust reduced the amount of unburned coal passing through the tubes and up the stacks.


Class B2 (Locobase 9858)

Data from Milwaukee Road 1930 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 21, p. 58. Baldwin works numbers were 15509-15510 in September 1897; 15898 in April 1898; 16157-16161 in August 1898; 16186-16190 in September 1898; 17216-17221, 17239-17244 in November 1899; and 18018-18030, 18049-18051 in August 1900.

This larger class of Vauclain compounds followed the B1s described in Locobase 9857 and had greater cylinder volume, which was served by a much larger boiler and grate; the latter resulted from a firebox that was lengthened considerably and widened by 6" . The specs give a reason for this: "Steam producing capacity to be increased proportionately to weight on drivers."

4102, 4108, 4114, 4123-4125 originally went to the Marinette, Tomahawk & Western.

The class was rebuilt as 20"x 26" simple-expansion G-6 class engines in the twenties and operated until the end of steam.


Class B3 (Locobase 9861)

Data from Milwaukee Road 1930 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 23, p. 90. Baldwin works numbers were 18053-18054, 18071, 18079-18082 in August 1900; 18083, 18115-18119, 18156-18159, 18167-18170, and 18212-18215 in September.

At the turn into the 20th Century, the Chicago, Milwaukee, & St Paul's Vauclain-compound Ten-wheelers had evolved into a design similar to those used on most other railroads.

Compared to other railroads, however, the Milwaukee was relatively late in converting its engines to simple-expansion. This class received 22" x 26" cylinders in the latter half of the 1920s. So refitted, the class carried on until the end of steam.


Class B3-x (Locobase 9859)

Data from Milwaukee Road 1930 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 22, p. 130. Baldwin works number was 16781 in May 1899.

This was one of an interesting pair of Vauclain compounds that featured slightly larger cylinders with longer strokes. This was the smaller-boilered variant; the larger 4300 appears in Locobase 9860. The firebox had combustion tubes 17 1/2" above the bottom of the "furnace, 3 each side, 3 back, 3 front." The specs required that these be "better beaded down" than those in earlier engines.

Notes in the specs insisted that the mud ring corners be "better fitted and the screw rivets enter the mud ring far enough to hold them." In earlier locomotives, some had entered "only 1/4"". And, as on many repeat orders from Baldwin (and likely other builders", "All springs should be stronger than last lot of engines."

Tender water capacity later increased considerably to 6,000 US gallons (22,730 litres) with a loaded weight increased to 116,754 lb (52,963 kg).

4200 was never rebuilt as a simple-expansion engine, going to the boneyard instead in February 1927.


Class B4 (Locobase 9862)

Data from Milwaukee Road 1930 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. (NB: The DeGolyer digitization of Volume 23 of the Baldwin specifications books did not reproduce the page 10 entry referring to this class.) Baldwin works numbers were 18201-18203, 18219-18222, 18246-18249, 18268-18272 in September 1900.

Continuing its evolution of the Vauclain compound Ten-wheeler design, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul procured this batch with a larger boiler than the immediately preceding B-3s (Locobase 9861), a 30" stroke for the cylinders, and 13"(330 mm)-diameter piston valves.

In the early 1920s, the Milwaukee rebuilt the class a simple-expansion engines with 21" x 30" cylinders


Class B4 - 62"" (Locobase 9863)

Data from Milwaukee Road 1930 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Baldwin works numbers were

1901

August 19430-19436, 19469-19474; September 19508-19509, 19540-19543, 19554-19555; October 19556-19560, 19594-19601

1902

August 20850-20851, 20856-20858, 20905, 20926-20930, 20973-20975, 21017

1903

August 22620-22621, 22645-22647, 22689, 22704, 22707, 22724-22725, 22746, 22748-22750; September 22771, 22802, 22828.

The smaller wheels of this Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul Vauclain compound Ten-wheeler freight design seem to have cleared the way for a bigger grate to supply a boiler essentially unchanged from the earlier B-4s (Locobase 9861). Obviously pleased with the proportions, the Milwaukee ordered several batches from Baldwin over the next few years.

As with most of the MLW 4-6-0 compounds, this class was rebuilt in the 1920s as simple-expansion engines with 22" x 28" cylinders.


Class B4-x (Locobase 9860)

Data from Milwaukee Road 1930 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Volume 22, p. 140. Works number was 16782 in May 1899.

The smaller of this long-stroke pair of Vauclain compounds appears in Locobase 9859. This engine had a larger boiler with more tubes and cylinders with larger diameters and longer strokes. Increasing each cylinder diameter in the pair by 1" each dropped the compounding ratio somewhat, though it was still higher than those adopted in most Continental locomotives.

Tender water capacity later increased considerably to 6,000 US gallons (22,730 litres) with a loaded weight increased to 116,754 lb (52,963 kg).

Like the 4200, 4300 was never rebuilt as a simple-expansion engine and was scrapped in January 1927.


Class D/G-5a (Locobase 10799)

Data from "Compound Locomotives", Angus Sinclair (ed), Report of proceedings of the 25th annual convention of the American Railway Master Mechanics Association, 20 June 1892, pp. 19+, specs on 24 and DeGolyer, Volume 17, p. 186. Works numbers were 12384-12386, 12392 in December 1891; 12394, 12397, 12400, 12408-12409 in January 1892.

At the same time the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul bought this octuple of Ten-wheelers, they bought a ninth fitted with the Vauclain four-cylinder compound system. Under the aegis of the AMMRA, the 822 from this group was pitted against the compound #827. See Locobase 10800 for a summary of the testing and the results.

In his report, George Gibbs said that the choice of a Class D engine to compare with the compound reflected the fact that the design "had been found suited on the St Paul road for handling variable business successfully, and was believed to be an economical machine."


Class G-4e (Locobase 11124)

Data from Schenectady Locomotive Works, Illustrated Catalogue of Simple and Compound Locomotives (Philadelphia: J B Lippincott, 1897), pp. 82-83 and CM&StP 10-1886 List & Description of Locomotives supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Builders' information from Bulletin 136 of the Railway and Locomotive Historical Society.

Road numbers (1885) Builder Works numbers Date produced

658-662 Rhode Island 1555-1559 June 1885

663-667 Rhode Island 1560-1564 July 1885

668-677 Schenectady 1976-1984 June 1885

694-698 Schenectady 2159-2163 August 1886

699-703 Schenectady 2164-2168 September 1886

704 Brooks 1185 February 1887

706-720 Rhode Island 1749-1763 March 1887

741-765 Grant 1888

766-780 Schenectady 2680-2684 August 1888

781-795 Rhode Island 2038-2052 September 1888

Large orders of mixed-traffic Ten-wheelers weren't uncommon, but any time a single design merited production of more than 100 locomotives in three years for the same road was noteworthy. They were definitely mainline engines with relatively large boilers, grates and fireboxes above the average, all to serve a considerable cylinder volume and put mainline weight on the drivers.

The 1885 list shows 177 tubes (rather than the 179 in Schenectady's catalogue).

Clearly, the G4-es suited requirements because almost all of the class remained on the roster for over 40 years and a few came close to the half-century mark.


Class G-8 (Locobase 9872)

Data from Milwaukee Road 1945 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

As noted in Locobase 9864, the Milwaukee's 1945 figure is too high, most likely because it included a "bonus" because of the drier steam it created. Locobase has adjusted the area by deducting about 40% and comparing the result with other locomotives of similar superheater layouts.


Class G5-s (Locobase 16170)

Data from Milwaukee Road 1930 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Almost twenty years after Baldwin delivered the Vauclain compound B1 class shown in Locobase 9857, it finally abandoned the system in favor of simple expansion. At the same time, the railroad added a superheater. As in most such updates, the locomotives traded in about half of their small tubes for superheater flues. The upgrade included adoption of piston valves operated by outside radial valve in place of the inside Stephenson link motion. 17.67 sq ft (1.64 sq m) of arch tubes contributed to the firebox heating surface area.


Class G6 (Locobase 11436)

Data from "Locomotive Building," The Railroad Gazette, Vol XLI, No 15 (5 October 1906), p. 96 and MILWRD 1930ca Locomotive Diagrams supplied in 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.


Class G6-fs/G6-gs (Locobase 9864)

Data from Milwaukee Road 1945 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

The B2s delivered in 1897 were among the first of Chicago, Milwaukee, St Paul & Pacific's tandem compounds to be rebuilt as simple-expansion engines with outside radial valve gear and piston valves; 20.5 sq ft of the firebox heating surface came from arch tubes.. One group received 20" cylinders and was dubbed G6-fs;they are shown here. Three G6-gs (2369-2371) had smaller tenders.

In the diagram, the superheater area is shown as 471 sq ft. Locobase believes that the Milwaukee used the "equivalent surface area" concept that conferred a 50% "bonus" on each square foot of superheater. When calculated as shown in the specifications, the ratio of superheater area matches other similar designs.


Class G6-ms (Locobase 9865)

Data from Milwaukee Road 1945 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

The second half of the B2 class (Locobase 9858) to be superheated was modified 6 years after the start of the earlier program (Locobase 9864). Boiler pressure increased by 20 psi while the cylinder shrank by an inch. Otherwise the two sub-classes were very similar, although the measurements of tube and flue areas vary.


Class G6-ns (Locobase 9866)

Data from Milwaukee Road 1945 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Four of the 1897 B2s (Locobase 9858) to be simpled and superheated had the same cylinder dimensions as the G6-ms, but a few more boiler tubes. The result was a heavier locomotive with a bit more heating surface area, but otherwise similar to the B2/G6 conversions.


Class G6-os (Locobase 9867)

Data from Milwaukee Road 1945 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

NB: The superheater area is an estimate. As noted in Locobase 9864, the Milwaukee's 1945 figure is too high, most likely because it included a "bonus" because of the drier steam it created. Locobase has adjusted the area by deducting about 40% and comparing the result with other locomotives of similar superheater layouts.


Class G6-ps (Locobase 9868)

Data from Milwaukee Road 1945 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also John F Boose "Hiawathas at New Lisbon", Trains, Vol 1 (July 1941), pp. 43-47 , found at the Milwaukee Road archives http://milwaukeeroadarchives.com/Passenger/1941%20July%20Trains%20Hiawathas%20at%20New%20Lisbon.pdf.

As noted in Locobase 9864, the Milwaukee's 1945 figure for superheater area is too high, most likely because it included a "bonus" because of the drier steam it created. Locobase has adjusted the area by deducting about 40% and comparing the result with other locomotives of similar superheater layouts.

Chris Hohl emailed me in October 2012 with information about the Milwaukee Road's less well-known streamlining efforts. Two of the locomotives in this class--2765 and 2769--were wrapped in streamlined shrouds to pull the Northwoods Hiawatha. This train left New Lisbon, Wisc--about halfway between Chicago and Minneapolis on the Milwaukee Road's main line--and headed north up the Wisconsin River (hence, "Valley Line") about 200 miles (322 km) to Star Lake beginning in 1936.

2769 went through the process first in November 1936; 2765 followed a year later in November 1937. They were placed in their own class G and renumbered 10 and 11, respectively. Boose's 1941 report says the two "elderly" Ten-wheelers were dipped in the "locomotive fountain of youth." Perhaps--in any case the shrouding was a near duplicate of the streamlining used on the new A-class 4-4-2s (Locobase ), but on a shorter boiler.

The pair served the Northwoods Hiawatha for more than a decade. 10 was "de-shrouded" in 1946 and 11 in November 1948. Both returned to the G-6ps class, but renumbered 1112 and 1111. 1111 was retired on 3 May 1951 with 1112 following on 29 October 1951.


Class G6-s (Locobase 9869)

Data from Milwaukee Road 1945 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

As noted in Locobase 9864, the Milwaukee's 1945 figure is too high, most likely because it included a "bonus" because of the drier steam it created. Locobase has adjusted the area by deducting about 40% and comparing the result with other locomotives of similar superheater layouts.


Class G7 (Locobase 11437)

Data from "Locomotive Building," The Railroad Gazette, Vol XLI, No 15 (5 October 1906), p. 96.

At the same time Baldwin was supplying the Vauclain compound B4 class, the Milwaukee's own shops turned out these simple-expansion freighters.


Class G7-as (Locobase 9870)

Data from Milwaukee Road 1945 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

As noted in Locobase 9864, the Milwaukee's 1945 figure is too high, most likely because it included a "bonus" because of the drier steam it created. Locobase has adjusted the area by deducting about 40% and comparing the result with other locomotives of similar superheater layouts.


Class G7-bs/G7-cs (Locobase 9871)

Data from Milwaukee Road 1945 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

All of these B4 freight rebuilds had the 22"x 28" cylinders and piston valves. Fourteen operated the valves with Walschaert gear; the other four used Baker gear.

As noted in Locobase 9864, the Milwaukee's 1945 figure is too high, most likely because it included a "bonus" because of the drier steam it created. Locobase has adjusted the area by deducting about 40% and comparing the result with other locomotives of similar superheater layouts.

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class10 / G6-k11 / G2-c11 / G6-d15 / G6-e21 / G4-f
Locobase ID11505 11504 13161 13162 12268
RailroadTacoma Eastern (CMStP&P)Tacoma Eastern (CMStP&P)Idaho & Washington Northern (CMStP&P)Idaho & Washington Northern (CMStP&P)Southern Indiana (CMStP&P)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class61237
Road Numbers10, 12, 15 / 2334-233611 / 200711-12 / 2713-271415-17 / 2715-271721-27 / 301-307
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built61237
BuilderBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & Co
Year19041904190719071898
Valve GearStephensonStephensonWalschaertWalschaertStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase12.50'11.67'15'13.50'11.83'
Engine Wheelbase23.50'21.62'26.95'24.33'21.83'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.53 0.54 0.56 0.55 0.54
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)48.17'53.75'46.83'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers120000 lbs87000 lbs105000 lbs108800 lbs80000 lbs
Engine Weight150000 lbs116000 lbs145700 lbs146500 lbs108000 lbs
Tender Light Weight80000 lbs80000 lbs100000 lbs120000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight230000 lbs196000 lbs245700 lbs266500 lbs
Tender Water Capacity4000 gals4000 gals5000 gals6000 gals4000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)9 tons tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)67 lb/yard48 lb/yard58 lb/yard60 lb/yard44 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter62"62"56"63"56"
Boiler Pressure180 psi180 psi200 psi200 psi180 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)18" x 24"18" x 24"18" x 26"19" x 26"17" x 24"
Tractive Effort19189 lbs19189 lbs25573 lbs25327 lbs18950 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 6.25 4.53 4.11 4.30 4.22
Heating Ability
Firebox Area175 sq. ft132.10 sq. ft156 sq. ft129 sq. ft116.80 sq. ft
Grate Area34.70 sq. ft22.80 sq. ft17.60 sq. ft37.90 sq. ft26 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface2229 sq. ft1539 sq. ft2401 sq. ft2281 sq. ft1495 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface2229 sq. ft1539 sq. ft2401 sq. ft2281 sq. ft1495 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume315.34217.72313.54267.34237.11
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation62464104352075804680
Same as above plus superheater percentage62464104352075804680
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area3150023778312002580021024
Power L181685788775472025540
Power MT450.18440.01488.42437.80458.01

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class31 / G5-e9/G5-cB1B1/G-5xs - compoundB2
Locobase ID11559 11365 9857 10800 9858
RailroadSouthern Indiana (CMStP&P)Bellingham Bay & British Columbia (CMStP&P)Milwaukee Road (CMStP&P)Milwaukee Road (CMStP&P)Milwaukee Road (CMStP&P)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class10114137
Road Numbers31-40 / 311-320 / 2266-22759 / 2265828-37, 842-45/4001-14827/200/838/4000/2250/1185846-870, 204-258/4100-4136
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built10114137
BuilderBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & Co
Year19031907189518921897
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonWalschaertStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase12'15.50'14.83'13.50'
Engine Wheelbase22.21'26.50'38.83'25.25'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.54 0.58 0.38 0.53
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)48.71'38.83'51.17'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)36000 lbs
Weight on Drivers105000 lbs105000 lbs75000 lbs87970 lbs108000 lbs
Engine Weight134000 lbs140000 lbs120000 lbs122400 lbs148000 lbs
Tender Light Weight100000 lbs100000 lbs75000 lbs70000 lbs76000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight234000 lbs240000 lbs195000 lbs192400 lbs224000 lbs
Tender Water Capacity5000 gals5000 gals3800 gals3800 gals3800 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)10 tons7 tons tons7 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)58 lb/yard58 lb/yard42 lb/yard49 lb/yard60 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter54"56"62"62"62"
Boiler Pressure190 psi180 psi200 psi200 psi200 psi
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke)19" x 26"19" x 26"12.5" x 26"12" x 26"13.5" x 26"
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke)21" x 26" (2)20" x 26" (2)23" x 26" (2)
Tractive Effort28071 lbs25644 lbs16450 lbs15097 lbs19327 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.74 4.09 4.56 5.83 5.59
Heating Ability
Firebox Area122.20 sq. ft130 sq. ft141 sq. ft137 sq. ft171 sq. ft
Grate Area33 sq. ft33 sq. ft18.40 sq. ft18.40 sq. ft30 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface2165 sq. ft1696 sq. ft1632 sq. ft1679 sq. ft2229 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface2165 sq. ft1696 sq. ft1632 sq. ft1679 sq. ft2229 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume253.75198.78441.93493.33517.48
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation62705940368036806000
Same as above plus superheater percentage62705940368036806000
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area2321823400282002740034200
Power L155644619463451685098
Power MT350.47290.95408.65388.55312.20

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassB3B3-xB4B4 - 62""B4-x
Locobase ID9861 9859 9862 9863 9860
RailroadMilwaukee Road (CMStP&P)Milwaukee Road (CMStP&P)Milwaukee Road (CMStP&P)Milwaukee Road (CMStP&P)Milwaukee Road (CMStP&P)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class25116661
Road Numbers301-325/4201-4235253/300/1600/4200351-366/1701-16/4301-16367/1717/4317-4382252/350/1700/4300
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built25116661
BuilderBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & Co
Year19001899190019011899
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase13'12.42'12.42'12.92'12.42'
Engine Wheelbase26.42'24.92'25.42'25.50'24.92'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.49 0.50 0.49 0.51 0.50
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)54.94'53.54'55'55.93'53.54'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers123275 lbs120000 lbs135500 lbs132800 lbs133000 lbs
Engine Weight166775 lbs164000 lbs178845 lbs178900 lbs179000 lbs
Tender Light Weight116764 lbs78000 lbs116764 lbs125600 lbs73000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight283539 lbs242000 lbs295609 lbs304500 lbs252000 lbs
Tender Water Capacity6000 gals3800 gals6000 gals7000 gals3800 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)10 tons10 tons10 tons10 tons tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)68 lb/yard67 lb/yard75 lb/yard74 lb/yard74 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter68"68"68"62"68"
Boiler Pressure200 psi200 psi200 psi200 psi200 psi
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke)15" x 26"14" x 30"15" x 30"15" x 28"15" x 30"
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke)25" x 26" (2)24" x 30" (2)25" x 30" (2)25" x 28" (2)25" x 30" (2)
Tractive Effort21507 lbs21936 lbs24816 lbs25403 lbs24816 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 5.73 5.47 5.46 5.23 5.36
Heating Ability
Firebox Area218 sq. ft170.37 sq. ft198 sq. ft192.80 sq. ft176 sq. ft
Grate Area35 sq. ft31.50 sq. ft35 sq. ft46.60 sq. ft31.50 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface2715 sq. ft2447 sq. ft2946 sq. ft2926 sq. ft2745 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface2715 sq. ft2447 sq. ft2946 sq. ft2926 sq. ft2745 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume510.55457.80480.12510.93447.37
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation70006300700093206300
Same as above plus superheater percentage70006300700093206300
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area4360034074396003856035200
Power L158394760523450544821
Power MT313.27262.35255.48251.71239.74

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassD/G-5aG-4eG-8G5-sG6
Locobase ID10799 11124 9872 16170 11436
RailroadMilwaukee Road (CMStP&P)Milwaukee Road (CMStP&P)Milwaukee Road (CMStP&P)Milwaukee Road (CMStP&P)Milwaukee Road (CMStP&P)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class9101251428
Road Numbers818-826/181-189/2229-2237658-77, 694-704, 706-20, 741-7952600-2624/1000-10244001-4014/2251-22642300-2327
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built910128
BuilderBurnham, Williams & CoseveralMilwaukeeMILWCMStP
Year18911885192019141905
Valve GearStephensonStephensonBakerWalschaertStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase15.50'15.50'12.92'15.50'14.83'
Engine Wheelbase25.92'25.92'25.42'26.50'26.46'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.60 0.60 0.51 0.58 0.56
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)48.12'47.87'56.29'48.71'58.29'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers86200 lbs84000 lbs136300 lbs92100 lbs131000 lbs
Engine Weight117000 lbs108000 lbs182700 lbs132500 lbs178000 lbs
Tender Light Weight70000 lbs125600 lbs76760 lbs131480 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight187000 lbs308300 lbs209260 lbs309480 lbs
Tender Water Capacity3800 gals3600 gals7000 gals3800 gals7000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)10 tons7 tons10 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)48 lb/yard47 lb/yard76 lb/yard51 lb/yard73 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter62"63"63"63"73"
Boiler Pressure180 psi140 psi200 psi180 psi200 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)18" x 26"19" x 26"22" x 28"19" x 26"20.5" x 26"
Tractive Effort20788 lbs17729 lbs36569 lbs22795 lbs25445 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.15 4.74 3.73 4.04 5.15
Heating Ability
Firebox Area137 sq. ft126.60 sq. ft193.50 sq. ft168.67 sq. ft182 sq. ft
Grate Area18.40 sq. ft18.60 sq. ft46.60 sq. ft18.40 sq. ft30.30 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1679 sq. ft1592 sq. ft2210 sq. ft1299 sq. ft2538 sq. ft
Superheating Surface450 sq. ft271 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface1679 sq. ft1592 sq. ft2660 sq. ft1570 sq. ft2538 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume219.26186.59179.40152.25255.53
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation33122604932033126060
Same as above plus superheater percentage331226041090438756060
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area2466017724452793552236400
Power L15742383312320101488447
Power MT440.57301.80597.82728.75426.47

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassG6-fs/G6-gsG6-msG6-nsG6-osG6-ps
Locobase ID9864 9865 9866 9867 9868
RailroadMilwaukee Road (CMStP&P)Milwaukee Road (CMStP&P)Milwaukee Road (CMStP&P)Milwaukee Road (CMStP&P)Milwaukee Road (CMStP&P)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class17184414
Road Numbers2350-2367, 2369-712372-2389/1161-11782390-2393/1179-11822760-2763/1100-11032764-2775/1100-1118
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built
BuilderMilwaukeeMilwaukeeMilwaukeeMilwaukeeMilwaukee
Year19151921192119211925
Valve GearWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase13.50'13.50'13.50'13'13'
Engine Wheelbase25.25'25.25'25.25'26.06'26.06'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.53 0.53 0.53 0.50 0.50
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)51.33'51.33'51.33'55.69'60.27'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers112700 lbs119500 lbs120100 lbs134500 lbs138600 lbs
Engine Weight155500 lbs165600 lbs164500 lbs171900 lbs187650 lbs
Tender Light Weight84244 lbs76760 lbs116764 lbs116764 lbs134500 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight239744 lbs242360 lbs281264 lbs288664 lbs322150 lbs
Tender Water Capacity4700 gals3800 gals6000 gals6000 gals7000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)7 tons7 tons10 tons10 tons10 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)63 lb/yard66 lb/yard67 lb/yard75 lb/yard77 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter63"63"63"69"69"
Boiler Pressure180 psi200 psi200 psi200 psi200 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)20" x 26"19" x 26"19" x 26"22" x 26"22" x 26"
Tractive Effort25257 lbs25327 lbs25327 lbs31004 lbs31004 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.46 4.72 4.74 4.34 4.47
Heating Ability
Firebox Area171.65 sq. ft171 sq. ft171 sq. ft198.80 sq. ft198.80 sq. ft
Grate Area29.40 sq. ft29.40 sq. ft29.40 sq. ft35 sq. ft35 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1405 sq. ft1536 sq. ft1672 sq. ft1975 sq. ft1898 sq. ft
Superheating Surface336 sq. ft336 sq. ft336 sq. ft400 sq. ft400 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface1741 sq. ft1872 sq. ft2008 sq. ft2375 sq. ft2298 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume148.62180.03195.97172.65165.92
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation52925880588070007000
Same as above plus superheater percentage62976938688081908190
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area3676740356400144651946519
Power L11057013328136631320813053
Power MT620.31737.65752.42649.49622.88

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassG6-sG7G7-asG7-bs/G7-cs
Locobase ID9869 11437 9870 9871
RailroadMilwaukee Road (CMStP&P)Milwaukee Road (CMStP&P)Milwaukee Road (CMStP&P)Milwaukee Road (CMStP&P)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class9561024
Road Numbers2751-2759/1114-11222400-24552852-2865/1075-10842867-2890/1050-1073
GaugeStdStdStdStd
Number Built56
BuilderMilwaukeeCMStPMilwaukeeMilwaukee
Year1916190419211920
Valve GearWalschaertStephensonWalschaertBaker or Walschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase13'12.92'12.92'12.92'
Engine Wheelbase25.42'23.27'26.12'26.12'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.51 0.56 0.49 0.49
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)55.04'56.16'55.75'56.29'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers127500 lbs136000 lbs146400 lbs139100 lbs
Engine Weight169400 lbs177000 lbs189800 lbs182100 lbs
Tender Light Weight116764 lbs125600 lbs116764 lbs120600 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight286164 lbs302600 lbs306564 lbs302700 lbs
Tender Water Capacity6000 gals7000 gals6000 gals6000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)10 tons10 tons10 tons10 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)71 lb/yard76 lb/yard81 lb/yard77 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter69"69"69"63"
Boiler Pressure180 psi200 psi200 psi180 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)22.5" x 26"21" x 30"21" x 30"22" x 28"
Tractive Effort29186 lbs32596 lbs32596 lbs32912 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.37 4.17 4.49 4.23
Heating Ability
Firebox Area198.80 sq. ft186 sq. ft198.30 sq. ft198.30 sq. ft
Grate Area35 sq. ft34.16 sq. ft35 sq. ft46.80 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1975 sq. ft2919 sq. ft2165 sq. ft2215 sq. ft
Superheating Surface400 sq. ft450 sq. ft450 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface2375 sq. ft2919 sq. ft2615 sq. ft2665 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume165.06242.72180.02179.80
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation6300683270008424
Same as above plus superheater percentage7371683281909856
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area41867372004640241762
Power L11136573611378211133
Power MT589.54357.98622.62529.35

Reference


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