Kansas City, Wyandotte & Northwestern / Missouri Pacific / Little Rock & Fort Smith / Saint Louis, Brownsville & Mexico / International & Great Northern / Saint Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern 4-6-0 "Ten-Wheeler" Type Locomotives

Class Details by Steve Llanso

Class 1101 / 1601 (Locobase 10051)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection. Works numbers 3744-3751 in January 1901; 3786-37 in March 1901.

The first 14 of this class -- originally numbered in the 1100s -- had piston valves; the latter 15 -- 1601-1615 -- were equipped with slide valves. These were the last of the MoPac's passenger Ten-wheelers and they operated until the mid-1930s.

Class 14 (Locobase 10041)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection. Works numbers were 9764-9765 in January 1889. (10812, 10184 in April 1890 may have been built to the same design.)

This pair of small Ten-wheelers served the KC, W & NW for several years. The railway extended northwest from Kansas City in the direction of the Black Hills of South Dakota as far as Virginia City, Nebraska, where it connected with the Rock Island.

Unfortunately for its backers, the railway failed and was bought up by the Jay Gould-controlld Missouri Pacific in 1894. At that point it was renamed simply Kansas City Northwestern. Its fortunes never really improved and the line was abandoned in October 1919 and actually taken up some time in the 1920s.

As for the pair of Ten-wheelers described here, they shed a few tubes in a later rebuilding, winding up with 225.

Class 17 (Locobase 11865)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Vol 13, pp.141 & 194. Works numbers were 8248 in November 1886 and 8415 in March 1887.

Class 21 (Locobase 11690)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines, 1890, as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Vol 16, p. 25.

Works numbers were 10812 and 10814 in April 1890.

This pair of Ten-wheelers preceded a larger class that went to the Missouri Pacific later in the year (Locobase 10039). Delivered with 20" (508 mm) cylinders, but soon reduced to 18" (457 mm). Very soon after the two engines arrived on the KCW&NW, they were sold in 1891 as a set to the Chicago & Grand Trunk as their class A1 and renumbered 152-153. The two were renumbered 1241-1242 in 1898-1891 and 1287-1288.

After the Grand Truck was absorbed by the Canadian National in 1920, the 1288 was scrapped, but 1287 was redesignated G-19-a in 1923 and renumbered 1167.

Class 21 / C-3-D (Locobase 12712)

Data from DeGolyer, Volume 27, p. 29. Works numbers were 24144, 24148, 24163 in April 1906; 24189, 24195 in May.

This quintet of Ten-wheelers soon went to the Trinity & Brazos Valley as a class in 1907, were renumbered, and operated on that road for decades. The Boll Weevil scrapped the 54 in June 1929, then suffered its own transformation in 1930 as it was reorganized as the Burlington-Rock Island. The class shrank as 56 was scrapped in 1931, 55 in 1937, 53 in 1939, and 52 in 1944.

Class 2501 (Locobase 10035)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

This class of Rogers engines had a good deal more heating surface area than the 1893 Rogers engines supplied to the International Great Northern (Locobase 6893).

Class 2516 (Locobase 10036)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Somehow, Cooke's decade of locomotives (works #2402-2411) were built to the same specifications as the Rogers engines of the same year (Locobase 10035), but ended up with a slightly lower tube heating surface. Otherwise the designs were identical.

Class 2807 (Locobase 10042)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Classic early-80s Ten-wheeler with the dome right over the firebox and the firebox shoved down between the 2nd and 3rd axles.

Class 2834 (Locobase 10043)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Bought by the MP in 1910, this locomotive had entered service in the mid-1880s.

NB: EHS is tube heating surface only.

Class 629 / 2702 / TN-61 (Locobase 10040)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection. Works numbers were 9766, 9768-9769, 9771, 9774, 9777 in January 1889; 10067, 10069-10070, 10072-10073, 10076-10078 in June; 10103, 10106, 10108-10111, 10114 in July; 10160, 10162, 10165, 10169, 10254-10255, 10262, 10265, 10297, 10303 in August; 11408 in November 1890; and, 11414-11416 in December.

2701 was sold to the New Orleans & Lower Coast in the 1920s. 2702 operated on the St 2736 later went to the Arkansas Railroad, then the Cadiz Railroad in Missouri where it operated as #12 until March 1953.

Class 667 / TN-56 - 2626 (Locobase 10038)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection. Works numbers were 12738-12740, 12744, 12746-12749, 12755-12759, 12767-12768, 12771-12773, 12778-12780, 12782-12784, 12790-12791 in June 1892; 12799-12801, 12810, 12815, 12816, 12822 in July.

693 / 2652 was later sold to the Minneapolis Northfield & Southern. 695 / 2644 received 61" drivers, then was sold to the Cassville & Exeter.

The C & E (see http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~mobarry/Exeter/train.htm), originally known as the Cassville & Western and located in Missouri, was recognized at one point by Ripley's Believe It or Not as the shortest railroad in America at 4.8 miles. 2644 came to the C & E in 1946 when Ray Dingler made one last effort to continue railroading, but a 1949 ice storm wrecked any real chance of success and the railroad closed soon after.

Class 7701 (Locobase 10052)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Although virtually identical to the MP engines delivered a year earlier (Locobase 10035) by the same builder, these had a clerestory in the cab and taller drivers.

Class T 17/24 64B (Locobase 6786)

Data from IGN 2 - 1923 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Ten-wheelers that were rated for passenger and freight.For some reason, some of the class had the dome on the conical section of the boiler and others over the firebox. The tender's oil-fuel capacity was rated at 35 barrels (1,470 US gallons).

Class T 18/24 86D (Locobase 6890)

Data from IGN 2 - 1923 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

These Ten-wheelers looked bigger than they were. In fact, they're about the same size as the I & GN's 4-4-0s. Locobase supposes that the design's intent was to put more adhesive weight on relatively light rail. Thus, the boiler the direct heating surface were small and the grate only average for a 4-6-0, but suitable for the light-density duty they must have undertaken. The tender's oil-fuel capacity was rated at 44 barrels (1,848 US gallons).

Class T 18/24 96E (Locobase 6891)

Data from IGN 2 - 1923 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Two years after the Schenectady Ten-wheelers, the I & GN took delivery of these larger examples from one of the Paterson, New Jersey builders. The grate's width spanned the distance between the rear two driving axles, but rested over them. Note the large amount of direct heating surface. As with most 1890s American locomotives, the considerable girth of the boiler at the firebox and steam dome end tapered sharply to a much smaller tube-filled course forward. The tender's oil-fuel capacity was rated at 44 barrels (1,848 US gallons).

By the time of the IGN's diagram book publication date, two of the class had been converted to 0-6-0 switchers. This entailed deleting the leading truck and shifting the three driving axles forward. At least three others were superheated; see Locobase 6892.

Class T 18/24 96Es (Locobase 6892)

Data from IGN 2 - 1923 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Three of the Cooke Ten-wheelers delivered in 1892 and described in Locobase 6891 received a new, superheated boiler and 8" piston valves for their cylinders. The percentage of superheated surface is relatively generous for such conversions. The enhanced boiler, coupled with an atypical increase in boiler pressure, conferred not just greater tractive effort but appreciably more power at speed.

Class T 18/28 88J (Locobase 6898)

Data from IGN 2 - 1923 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Among the dozens of mixed-traffic Ten-wheelers running on the I & GN were these higher-drivered passenger types from Cooke (builder's numbers 2730-2735). Notice the relatively long stroke for such a small cylinder diameter. The tender's oil-fuel capacity was rated at 60 barrels (2,520 US gallons).

It's not clear whether any of these were ever superheated..

Class T 19/24 104K (Locobase 6900)

Data from IGN 2 - 1923 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

This sextet was based on the Cooke passenger engines of a year earlier (Locobase 6898), but had smaller drivers. The tender's oil-fuel capacity was rated at 62 barrels (2,604 US gallons).

Class T 19/24 118H (Locobase 6899)

Data from IGN 2 - 1923 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Cooke (builder's numbers 2667-2671, 2703-2707) supplied these low-drivered Ten-wheelers to the I & GN in the same year the company produced the 6 passenger engines shown in Locobase 6898. The tender's oil-fuel capacity was rated at 60 barrels (2,520 US gallons).

Class T 19/24 98F (Locobase 6893)

Data from IGN 2 - 1923 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Near the end of the 19th Century, the pre-eminent Paterson builder received a sizable order for engines with the same firebox dimensions as the 1893 Cookes (Locobase 6891), but which heated a larger boiler. The tender's oil-fuel capacity was rated at 60 barrels (2,520 US gallons).

These do not seem to have been rebuilt with superheaters later on.

Class T 20/28 130 - 1909, 1911 (Locobase 13792)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 38, p.206 and 213. Works numbers were 33542-33546 in July 1909; 36825-36826 in August 1911; 36901-36907 in September.

The Baldwin spec says that the details of these two batches of engines and tenders were "..to be exact duplicate of ...Brooks Works Locos. 45609-45618 [Locobase 6896]...unless otherwise specified." When the two sets are compared, the firebox heating surface area of the Baldwins was quite a bit smaller. The 1911 locomotives were delivered as oil burners.

Both these engines and the Brooks were superheated to a common standard; see Locobase 6897.

Class T 20/28 130G (Locobase 6894)

Data from "Rogers' Ten-Wheeler," Locomotive Engineering (December 1900), p. 509.and from IGN 2 - 1923 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

At the turning of the century, Rogers supplied 6 relatively large Ten-wheelers to the Calvert, Waco & Brazos Valley. The C W & BV had a relatively short independent existence as a railroad, having been chartered on 28 June 1899 and acquired by the International Great Northern, 12 February 1901, and merged 1 May 1901.

The inherited sextet's design set the pattern for the most numerouse I & GN class as Cooke followed with 11 more in 1901 and 15 more in 1903 (builders' # for the latter batch were 26695-26700, 27243-27252). Baldwin added 10 more in 1906 with a slightly smaller amount of EHS (2,473 sq ft including 254 sq ft of direct heating surface). The tender's oil-fuel capacity was rated at 60 barrels (2,520 US gallons).

As well as putting 16 more tons of adhesion on the rails than earlier I & GN engines from the same builders, these locomotives had more than proportionately bigger boilers that proved suitable for superheating later. See Locobase 6895 for the result.

Class T 20/28 130G -1908 (Locobase 6896)

Data from IGN 2 - 1923 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Two years after Baldwin filled in the last of the 85-ton Ten-wheelers described in Locobase 6894, the I & GN went to still another builder for similar locomotives with more evaporative heating surface. Locobase can't tell why the firebox heating surface was so high; it's almost 60 sq ft more than we found in the 14 Baldwins built to the same design in 1909 and 1911; see Locobase 13792.

Like the other 4-6-0s, these were superheated later; see Locobase 6897.

Class T 20/28 130Gs (Locobase 6895)

Data from IGN 2 - 1923 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

As with the earlier Cooke rebuilds, superheating the 1900-1901 Ten-wheelers (Locobase 6894) yielded a considerable increase in power because the relatively large amount of boiler given over to the superheater.

Class T 20/28 130Gs2 (Locobase 6897)

Data from IGN 2 - 1923 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

The Brooks and Baldwin Ten-wheelers that came on the road in 1908 and 1909 were slightly larger versions of the more numerous 65-ton 4-6-0s. So when they were superheated later on, their superheaters were identical to the earlier group, but total heating surface was a bit more.

The tender's oil-fuel capacity was rated at 60 barrels (2,520 US gallons).

Class TN 63 - 30.2 (Locobase 7760)

Data from MP SUBS 7 -1935 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

As noted in Locobase 6894, Rogers supplied 4 relatively large Ten-wheelers that set the pattern for the most numerouse I & GN class. That entry has information about succeeding locomotives in the class.

This entry shows what happened when the I & GN superheated the original series of locomotives. Although the conversion reduced the number of small tubes by 107, overall heating surface area increased by 179 sq ft and almost 1 in 5 of that total was superheated. A few rode on 68" drivers, but were otherwise similar.

Class TN-56 (Locobase 10037)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection. Works numbers were 13642-13644, 13646, 13663, 13665, 13671, 13673-13674, 13686-13688, 13694, 13697 in August 1893 and 13706-13707, 13710, 13715, 13721-13722, 13728-13729, 13731, 13739, 13742, 13747, 13759 in September.

This set of orders sent locomotives to the Missouri Pacific (the August batch) and the affiliated Saint Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern (September) as their 760 class. Compared to the slightly earlier deliveries shown in Locobases 10038-10039, this Ten-wheeler had 2 fewer tubes, but was otherwise identical.

2601 was sold to the Graysonia, Nashville & Ashdown

Class TN-56 - 2657 (Locobase 10039)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection. Works numbers were 11130, 11334-11335, 11338-11339, 11341-11342, 11344-11345, 11365, 11387, 11392, 11394, 11400 in November 1890; 11413-1141 and 11431 in December;

The first of a series of Baldwin Ten-wheeler orders supplied to the St L, IM & S in the 1890s (see Locobases 10037-10038 for the later variants). These and the 1892 locomotives differed only in driver diameter and then not by much. A few -- 2661, 2664, 2665, 2668 -- were later refitted with 61" drivers.

Class TN-57 - 239 (Locobase 7754)

Data from MP SUBS 7 - 1935 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection. For an fascinating article on the Artesian Belt, see Carl Codney and Jim King, "A Road to Nowhere - Charles Simmons and the Artesian Belt Railroad". (http://codney.tnorr.com/simmons.htm) - it's well worth finding and reading it.

As noted in Locobase 13903, the 235 originally came on the scene as the Artesian Belt's #2. Eight years later, the AB, in its newer identity as the San Antonio Southern, sold the 2 to the Fort Smith & Western, which renumbered it 21. The FS & W sold it to locomotive rebuilder Southern Iron & Equipment, which sold it to the San Antonio, Uvalde & Gulf in 1923 as their #32. And when the MP took over the Link Line two years later, they renumbered it 235.

At some point the saturated boiler had been superseded by a superheated vessel with smaller-diameter tubes and a clutch of flues for the superheater elements. Driver diameter increased first to 57", then in 1931 to 58".

Class TN-61 (Locobase 10034)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

These were among the last locomotives to be built by Brooks under its independent works number system; the engines were numbered 3702-3703, 3707, 3712-3715, 3735-3742, 3792-3816, 3846-3864. Before the class was complete in 1902, Brooks had delivered both piston-valve and slide-valve versions. See Locobase 12561 for the few Baldwins that shared this class ID.

The relatively low axle loading meant that while most were scrapped before World War II, a couple survived until 1955 because bridges on many branch lines could not support anything larger.

Class TN-61 (Locobase 12561)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection. See also Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Vol 24, p. 93 . Works numbers were 19679-19680 in November 1901.

Locobase 10034 shows the large Brooks batches that possessed identical power dimensions, but had smaller boilers and larger fireboxes. The Baldwin specs showed 350 13-ft long tubes measuring a total of 2,367 sq ft and a small firebox of 135 sq ft. Together, that amounted to a sizable 2,502 sq ft, considerably larger than equivalent dimensions in the Brooks engines.

It's not clear if these were delivered with Walschaert gear, but the 1924 diagrams affirm that they used the outside radial gear system by then. Moreover, they appear to have received boilers with fewer, but longer tubes (18" longer), which in the 2403 yielded the heating surfaces shown in Locobase.

The relatively low axle loading meant that while most were scrapped before World War II, a couple survived until 1955 because bridges on many branch lines could not support anything larger.

Class TN-63 - 252 (Locobase 7096)

Data from MP 1953ca Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection. 25887-25888 in June 1905; 25961 in July; 27134-27135, 27151-27152 in December; 32052-32053, 32071-32072 in October 1907; 32118 in November.

Small Ten-wheelers for an MP subsidiary. Baldwin delivered these Ten-wheelers and the Eight-wheelers shown in Locobase 7769 with equipment from several suppliers, according to the Railroad Gazette of 27 October 1905 (p. 132).

Tower couplers

Pyle-National electric headlights

Monitor injectors

Ajax journal bearings

Richardson valve rod packings

Baldwin standard safety valves

Leach sanding devices

Detroit sight-feed lubricators

Safety steam heat equipment

Midvale driving and truck wheel tires

At least two were later superheated and fitted with 10" piston valves. After the refit, the boiler held 118 2" tubes and 18 5 1/2" flues. Total evaporative heating surface came to 1,265 sq ft while the superheater added 240 sq ft.

Class TN-63- 351 saturated (Locobase 7815)

Data from MP SUBS 7 - 1935 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

This is the large class of Ten-wheelers that were delivered by several builders from 1901 to 1908. Alco's Brooks & Cooke works and Baldwin (works numbers were 29484-29489, 29562, 29580 in November 1911; 29682-29683 in December.)

Class TN-64 (Locobase 10050)

Data from MP 1924 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection. Works numbers 7812-7813 in February 1886; 8575-8576, 8584, 8586-8587, 8597 in May 1887.

This octet of mixed-traffic Ten-wheelers gained evaporative heating surface area by resorting to 2 1/4"-diameter tubes. But the grate remained small, the firebox deep and between the rear two driving axles.

7805 was later sold to the Wichita Northwestern, which operated it until the line was abandoned in March 1941.

Class TN-67 - 333 (Locobase 7813)

Data from MP SUBS 7 - 1935 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Although Alco's Cooke works delivered these three big Ten-wheelers as a trio in 1901-1903, the railroad modified their boilers differently when it came time to install a 26-tube superheater. The 339 had the larger boiler as shown in the specs.

Class TN-67 - 341 (Locobase 7814)

Data from MP SUBS 7 - 1935 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

When Baldwin delivered this set of 10 locomotives in 1906, they were saturated and, most likely, similar to the Cooke engines that came on the road a few years earlier. As they were modified with superheaters and other appurtenances, a few variations appeared. 344 was the only one with a Roach steam chest (most likely a modified slide valve); the others received 11" piston valves. Two of the class (347, 350) received Walschaert valve gear; the others all retained their Stephenson link motion.

Class TN-67 - 371 (Locobase 7817)

Data from MP SUBS 7 - 1935 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

These were identical to the upgrades to the original 41-locomotive order of the early 1900s (Locobase 7815), but built new by the IGN in the 1920s. Obviously the balance of power and size was just what the I & GN wanted.


Specifications by Steve Llanso
Class1101 / 160114172121 / C-3-D2501251628072834629 / 2702 / TN-61667 / TN-56 - 26267701T 17/24 64BT 18/24 86DT 18/24 96ET 18/24 96EsT 18/28 88JT 19/24 104KT 19/24 118HT 19/24 98FT 20/28 130 - 1909, 1911T 20/28 130GT 20/28 130G -1908T 20/28 130GsT 20/28 130Gs2TN 63 - 30.2TN-56TN-56 - 2657TN-57 - 239TN-61TN-61TN-63 - 252TN-63- 351 saturatedTN-64TN-67 - 333TN-67 - 341TN-67 - 371
Locobase ID10051 10041 11865 11690 12712 10035 10036 10042 10043 10040 10038 10052 6786 6890 6891 6892 6898 6900 6899 6893 13792 6894 6896 6895 6897 7760 10037 10039 7754 10034 12561 7096 7815 10050 7813 7814 7817
RailroadMissouri Pacific (MP)Kansas City, Wyandotte & Northwestern (MP)Little Rock & Fort Smith (MP)Kansas City, Wyandotte & Northwestern (MP)Saint Louis, Brownsville & Mexico (MP)Missouri Pacific (MP)Saint Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern (MP)Missouri Pacific (MP)Missouri Pacific (MP)Saint Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern (MP)Saint Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern (MP)Missouri Pacific (MP)International & Great Northern (MP)International & Great Northern (MP)International & Great Northern (MP)International & Great Northern (MP)International & Great Northern (MP)International & Great Northern (MP)International & Great Northern (MP)International & Great Northern (MP)International & Great Northern (MP)International & Great Northern (MP)International & Great Northern (MP)International & Great Northern (MP)International & Great Northern (MP)International & Great Northern (MP)Missouri Pacific (MP)Saint Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern (MP)Missouri Pacific (MP)Missouri Pacific (MP)Missouri Pacific (MP)Saint Louis, Brownsville & Mexico (MP)International & Great Northern (MP)Missouri Pacific (MP)International & Great Northern (MP)International & Great Northern (MP)International & Great Northern (MP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSAUSAUSAUSAUSAUSAUSAUSAUSAUSAUSAUSAUSAUSAUSAUSAUSAUSAUSAUSAUSAUSAUSAUSAUSAUSAUSAUSAUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Road Numbers1101-14, 1601-29/7501-2914-15 / 2734-273517-1821-22/152-153/1241-1242/1287-1288/116721-25 / 52-562501-2515765-774 / 2516-25252806-08, 2813, 28182834629-657 / 2701-2727667-705 /2627-26567701-771071-80110-1192156-2164122, 123, 128301-306307-312145-154266-280 / 5252-5269252-265201-241242-251201-202242-43, 47, 49, 51-53, 55311-313701-715 / 2601-26252657-26742352301-24012402-2403251-262315-360277-284 / 7801-7808333, 339, 351-53, 355-60320, 341-350371-384
GaugeStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStd
BuilderBrooksBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoRogersCookeRogersRogersBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoRogersPittsburghSchenectadyCookeCookeCookeRhode IslandCookeRogersBaldwinseveralAlco-BrooksIGNBrooksseveralBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoMPBrooksBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoseveralBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoAlco-CookeIGNIGN
Year190118891886189019041898190018801885188918921899188118901892192419011902190118981909190019081908192418931890192119001901190519011886192819241923
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonWalschaertStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonWalschaertStephensonWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase14'10'11.50'14'12.42'12.50'13.33'11.50'11.50'12.45'12.83'11'12.17'12.17'12.75'12.75'12'12'13'13'13'13'13'13'11.50'11.50'12'14'13.50'14'13'14.50'13'13'13'
Engine Wheelbase24.42'20.15'22.17'25'23.33'23.33'24.04'22.25'22.25'23.33'23.20'20.92'22.50'22.50'23.50'23.50'22.50'22.42'23'23.83'23.83'23.83'23.83'23.83'22.25'22.17'23.13'24.17'24.33'24.75'23.83'25.79'23.83'23.83'23.83'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.57 0.50 0.52 0.56 0.53 0.54 0.55 0.52 0.52 0.53 0.55 0.53 0.54 0.54 0.54 0.54 0.53 0.54 0.57 0.55 0.55 0.55 0.55 0.55 0.52 0.52 0.52 0.58 0.55 0.57 0.55 0.56 0.55 0.55 0.55
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)53.21'50.45'50.45'47.33'48.47'48.37'50.48'47.62'48.17'47.42'47.67'56.33'56.33'52.33'50.76'56.50'53.83'56.50'53.83'56.50'53.83'48.37'48.19'52.50'53.19'49.33'56.50'50'58.25'56.50'58.25'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers112000 lbs90000 lbs64000 lbs90000 lbs114500 lbs109600 lbs109600 lbs68000 lbs74000 lbs90000 lbs100450 lbs109600 lbs64000 lbs86000 lbs96500 lbs96500 lbs88000 lbs104000 lbs118000 lbs98000 lbs134000 lbs130000 lbs134000 lbs130000 lbs134000 lbs130000 lbs100450 lbs91800 lbs113280 lbs122500 lbs133000 lbs95840 lbs140000 lbs90975 lbs148000 lbs130000 lbs148000 lbs
Engine Weight144850 lbs114000 lbs85000 lbs115000 lbs140000 lbs147300 lbs147300 lbs96000 lbs98000 lbs115000 lbs120800 lbs147300 lbs90000 lbs108000 lbs126500 lbs126500 lbs142000 lbs148000 lbs150000 lbs130000 lbs174000 lbs162000 lbs174000 lbs170000 lbs174000 lbs170000 lbs120800 lbs117500 lbs139080 lbs154000 lbs167000 lbs127040 lbs174000 lbs126150 lbs182000 lbs170000 lbs182000 lbs
Tender Light Weight98800 lbs74000 lbs93700 lbs93700 lbs62000 lbs66000 lbs78000 lbs87200 lbs93700 lbs88000 lbs88000 lbs97500 lbs97500 lbs123000 lbs125000 lbs110000 lbs110000 lbs130000 lbs114000 lbs136000 lbs114000 lbs136000 lbs114000 lbs87200 lbs86600 lbs113494 lbs106500 lbs98000 lbs104000 lbs136000 lbs84050 lbs161000 lbs126000 lbs161000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight243650 lbs188000 lbs241000 lbs241000 lbs158000 lbs164000 lbs193000 lbs208000 lbs241000 lbs178000 lbs196000 lbs224000 lbs224000 lbs265000 lbs273000 lbs260000 lbs240000 lbs304000 lbs276000 lbs310000 lbs284000 lbs310000 lbs284000 lbs208000 lbs204100 lbs252574 lbs260500 lbs265000 lbs231040 lbs310000 lbs210200 lbs343000 lbs296000 lbs343000 lbs
Tender Water Capacity5000 gals3600 gals3000 gals3500 gals5000 gals4000 gals4000 gals3600 gals4000 gals4000 gals4000 gals4000 gals4500 gals4500 gals4500 gals6600 gals5500 gals5000 gals6000 gals5500 gals5000 gals5500 gals5000 gals5500 gals4000 gals4000 gals6000 gals5000 gals5000 gals4500 gals6000 gals3600 gals8000 gals5600 gals8000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)9 tons10 tons tons tons2500 gals9 tons9 tons8 tons tons2500 gals9 tons9 tons9 tons9 tons10 tons10 tons12 tons12 tons12 tons12 tons3000 gals12 tons13 tons12 tons13 tons12 tons9 tons9 tons2741 gals2800 gals9 tons2300 gals2520 gals9 tons3360 gals2520 gals3360 gals
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) on which locomotive could run62 lb/yard50 lb/yard36 lb/yard50 lb/yard64 lb/yard61 lb/yard61 lb/yard38 lb/yard41 lb/yard50 lb/yard56 lb/yard61 lb/yard36 lb/yard48 lb/yard54 lb/yard54 lb/yard49 lb/yard58 lb/yard66 lb/yard54 lb/yard74 lb/yard72 lb/yard74 lb/yard72 lb/yard74 lb/yard72 lb/yard56 lb/yard51 lb/yard63 lb/yard68 lb/yard74 lb/yard53 lb/yard78 lb/yard51 lb/yard82 lb/yard72 lb/yard82 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter69"56"54"56"62"61"61"56.75"57"61"56"67"57"55"55"55"73"63"57"57"62"63"63"63"63"63"56"56"57"61"61"63"64"63"67"64"67"
Boiler Pressure200 psi130 psi130 psi130 psi180 psi180 psi190 psi140 psi140 psi150 psi150 psi180 psi160 psi140 psi160 psi180 psi190 psi190 psi170 psi170 psi200 psi190 psi190 psi190 psi190 psi200 psi150 psi150 psi190 psi200 psi200 psi180 psi190 psi160 psi210 psi190 psi200 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)19" x 26"19" x 24"18" x 24"18" x 24"20" x 26"20" x 24"20" x 24"18" x 24"18" x 24"19" x 24"20" x 24"20" x 24"17" x 24"18" x 24"18" x 24"18" x 24"18" x 28"19" x 28"19" x 24"19" x 24"20" x 28"20" x 28"20" x 28"20" x 28"20" x 28"20" x 28"20" x 24"20" x 24"18" x 26"19.5" x 28"19.5" x 28"19" x 24"20" x 28"20" x 24"21" x 28"20" x 28"21" x 28"
Tractive Effort23125 lbs17096 lbs15912 lbs15344 lbs25665 lbs24079 lbs25416 lbs16306 lbs16234 lbs18109 lbs21857 lbs21922 lbs16549 lbs16824 lbs19228 lbs21631 lbs20070 lbs25912 lbs21964 lbs21964 lbs30710 lbs28711 lbs28711 lbs28711 lbs28711 lbs30222 lbs21857 lbs21857 lbs23868 lbs29672 lbs29672 lbs21041 lbs28263 lbs20724 lbs32897 lbs28263 lbs31331 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.84 5.26 4.02 5.87 4.46 4.55 4.31 4.17 4.56 4.97 4.60 5.00 3.87 5.11 5.02 4.46 4.38 4.01 5.37 4.46 4.36 4.53 4.67 4.53 4.67 4.30 4.60 4.20 4.75 4.13 4.48 4.55 4.95 4.39 4.50 4.60 4.72
Heating Ability
Firebox Area177 sq. ft136 sq. ft127 sq. ft142 sq. ft187.50 sq. ft160 sq. ft160 sq. ft115 sq. ft145 sq. ft137 sq. ft175 sq. ft105 sq. ft116 sq. ft214 sq. ft214 sq. ft184 sq. ft189 sq. ft255 sq. ft214 sq. ft198.80 sq. ft245 sq. ft254 sq. ft255 sq. ft254 sq. ft255 sq. ft137 sq. ft137 sq. ft150 sq. ft161 sq. ft163 sq. ft133 sq. ft254 sq. ft138 sq. ft254 sq. ft254 sq. ft254 sq. ft
Grate Area32.50 sq. ft16.50 sq. ft25.60 sq. ft22.90 sq. ft29 sq. ft29 sq. ft15.50 sq. ft18 sq. ft23.70 sq. ft23.50 sq. ft28.70 sq. ft15.50 sq. ft24.50 sq. ft28 sq. ft28 sq. ft28 sq. ft27 sq. ft35 sq. ft28 sq. ft34 sq. ft35 sq. ft34 sq. ft35 sq. ft34 sq. ft34 sq. ft23.50 sq. ft23.30 sq. ft25 sq. ft32.40 sq. ft33 sq. ft17.04 sq. ft34 sq. ft19.70 sq. ft34 sq. ft34 sq. ft34 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface2003 sq. ft1700 sq. ft1401 sq. ft1905 sq. ft2124 sq. ft2101 sq. ft2086 sq. ft1445 sq. ft1546 sq. ft1915 sq. ft1902 sq. ft2101 sq. ft1433 sq. ft1397 sq. ft1586 sq. ft1308 sq. ft1675 sq. ft1675 sq. ft1932 sq. ft1644 sq. ft2587 sq. ft2481 sq. ft2657 sq. ft1880 sq. ft1999 sq. ft1869 sq. ft1888 sq. ft1902 sq. ft1444 sq. ft2269 sq. ft2493 sq. ft1715 sq. ft2276 sq. ft1876 sq. ft1988 sq. ft1868 sq. ft1988 sq. ft
Superheating Surface303 sq. ft494 sq. ft494 sq. ft494 sq. ft289 sq. ft494 sq. ft494 sq. ft494 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface2003 sq. ft1700 sq. ft1401 sq. ft1905 sq. ft2124 sq. ft2101 sq. ft2086 sq. ft1445 sq. ft1546 sq. ft1915 sq. ft1902 sq. ft2101 sq. ft1433 sq. ft1397 sq. ft1586 sq. ft1611 sq. ft1675 sq. ft1675 sq. ft1932 sq. ft1644 sq. ft2587 sq. ft2481 sq. ft2657 sq. ft2374 sq. ft2493 sq. ft2363 sq. ft1888 sq. ft1902 sq. ft1733 sq. ft2269 sq. ft2493 sq. ft1715 sq. ft2276 sq. ft1876 sq. ft2482 sq. ft2362 sq. ft2482 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume234.76215.85198.20269.50224.67240.76239.04204.43218.71243.15217.95240.76227.28197.64224.37185.04203.11182.29245.31208.74254.10243.69260.97184.66196.34183.58216.35217.95188.57234.44257.58217.76223.55214.97177.11183.48177.11
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation6500214533282977052205510217025203555352551662480343044805040532051305950476068006650646066506460680035253495475064806600306764603152714064606800
Same as above plus superheater percentage6500214533282977052205510217025203555352551662480343044805998532051305950476068006650646080477752822835253495555864806600306764603152856878178160
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area3540017680165101846033750288003040016100021750205503150016800162403424045839349603591043350363803976046550482605862557912617102055020550333453220032600239404826022080640085839560960
Power L1778536673370448960236083638837840511241506855472035895511119167274568965765565726972627695148941511815655412841501130264586950571170594940160951509715328
Power MT459.72269.48348.26329.88347.91367.08385.49368.040375.67273.25413.67487.77276.01377.71816.69546.70361.79368.58375.57358.78369.46379.80757.74746.18796.46271.80298.99659.87348.67345.61394.11333.48359.14719.26768.07684.98

Photos

Reference

Credits

Introduction and roster provided by Richard Duley. Class details and specifications provided by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media.