Grand Rapids & Indiana / Long Island / New York, Philadelphia & Norfolk / Pennsylvania / Sandusky & Columbus Short Line / Terre Haute & Indianapolis / Terre Haute & Peoria / Western New York & Pennsylvania 4-6-0 "Ten-wheeler" Locomotives of the USA


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class 121/Godd (Locobase 11642)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines, 1888, as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Vol 15, p. 192. Works numbers were 10170-10172 in August; 10425, 10428-10430 in November.

Although the Pennsy took over this quartet of Ten-wheelers as it did many other similar locomotives from the WNY & P in 1902, it held on to none of them for very long. By 1908, all had been sold to locomotive rebuilder and reseller Southern Iron & Equipment.

Butterfield Lumber Company bought the ex-6264 (ex-128, ex-122) from SI & E in June 1908 as their #7. Within the year, the 7 was lettered for the Natchez, Columbia & Mobile of Norfield, Miss. 7's final stop was the North Louisiana & Gulf, to which it ventured in 1933.

Rushton Northern bought the ex-6263 (ex-127, ex-121) from SI & E in December 1909; they renumbered it 3. The RN sold the 3 to Hodge Hunt Lumber in 1912 as their #7. And in 1927, the 3 was relettered for Southern Advance Bag & Paper.

Joining the 7 on the NC & M in 1910 was the ex-6265 (ex-129, ex-123) as #8. It was scrapped in 1935

SI&E sold the ex-6260 (ex-130, ex-124) on 28 June 1911 to Carolina & North Western as their 167. It was rebuilt with a new boiler in 1923, which delayed its scrapping date until May 1947.


Class 131/G odd (Locobase 12071)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Vol 18, p. 148. Works numbers were 13527 in June 1893 and 13563 in July.

After 15 years of service on the WNY & P and its successor, the Pennsylvania (which renumbered the pair), the earlier of the 2 - now 6267 - was sold to locomotive rebuilder/reseller Southern Iron & Equipment in May 1908. After its reconditioning, SI & E sold the engine to the Chesterfield & Lancaster and took the number 909. The C & L was taken over by the Seaboard Air Line, which operated the locomotive at least through 1923.

Two years after the 6267's departure, 6268 left the Pennsy for SI & E. After a similar makeover, it went to the 41-mile Great Southern Railroad of The Dalles, Oregon. Renumbered 2, this engine served the line through its decline, which featured the suspension of passenger service in 1928 and reorganization as the Dalles & Southern in 1933, until 1936.


Class 133/G odd (Locobase 12373)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Vol 22, p. 186. Works numbers were 17256-17257, 17288-17289 in December 1899.

The WNY & P's follow-on order from Baldwin resulted in taller drivers, slightly bigger boiler with 4 fewer tubes of greater length, significant increase in firebox heating surface, and more cylinder volume.

Pennsy operated the quartet for a few years after it took over the WNY&P in 1902 before selling them to locomotive rebuilder/reseller Southern Iron & Equipment in 1909-1910. Their comparative youth meant they all had second careers.

6269 was sold by SI&E to the Tallulah Falls Railway of Cornelia, Ga as #74 in 1911, traded to the Southern Railway in 1924, and scrapped by T J Knight in 1925.

6270 went from SI &E almost immediately to the Applachicola Northern as their 122 in 1909,. The ANR sold it to locomotive rebuilder/reseller Georgia Car & Locomotive in 1911; they found a buyer in the Blue Ridge Railway, which numbered it #6.

SI&E sold 6271 to the Macon, Dublin & Savannah as their #109 in September 1911. The MD & S was absorbed by the Seaboard Air Line as was the 109.

6272 had only one other owner. SI&E sold it in September 1909 to the Pittsburg & Gilmore of Armistead, Idaho as their #14. The P&G operated it until it was scrapped in August 1934.


Class 1502 (Locobase 2842)

Data from diagram scanned in by Robert Schoenberg of http://prr.railfan.net, supplemented by data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Volume 17, p. 208. Works number was 12619.

One of two compound Ten-wheelers trialed by the Pennsy at the end of the 19th century; cylinder dimensions are similar to the 4-4-0 Baldwin compound tested at the same time. Apparently, it was not acceptable even after being rebuilt with 61 1/2" drivers. as it was sold off the railroad in 1900 to the Mount Carmel & Natalie as their #2, from which it went to the Philadelphia & Reading in 1908 as 527. 527 was scrapped in May 1923.

The other engine in this trial was 1503, supplied by Schenectady and shown on Locobase 2843.


Class 1503 (Locobase 2843)

Data from diagram scanned in by Robert Schoenberg of http://prr.railfan.net . One of two compound Ten-wheelers trialed by the Pennsy at the end of the 19th century. Like other compound engines, this had a short life on the PRR, being retired in 1902. The other engine in this trial was 1502, supplied by Baldwin (Locobase 2842).

NB: The direct heating surface (including the firebox heating surface) is an estimate calculated by subtracting the calculated tube heating surface from the reported total evaporative heating surface.


Class 34/VG-5B/G25b (Locobase 8881)

Data from TraitT pratique de la machine locomotive ... By Maurice Demoulin, (Paris:

Librairie polytechnique, Baudry et Cie, 1898), p 395. Works number was 1450 in 1893.

Demoulin offered this engine as an faithful example (representant fidelment) of the six-coupled, high-speed locomotive used in America. He reported tonnage ratings at 65 km (40 mph) as 513 tons on the level. (Other figures included 363 tons up 0.3% grade, 272 tons up 1/2%, 163 tons up 0.8%.

When the TH&I was absorbed into the Vandalia, this engine was renumbered three times and gained her last number when the Pennsylvania incorporated the Vandalia stud and gave this single Pittsburgh a new number and class ID.


Class 71 (Locobase 12042)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Vol 18, p.58. Works numbers were 12928-12929, 12935, 12940-12941in September 1892; 12959, 12963 in October

This septet of Ten-wheelers was soon joined by an eighth that had two 12 1/2" HP and two 21" LP cylinders in a Vauclain compound layout. It would be rebuilt as a simple-expansion locomotive similar to the other 7.

The S & CSL linked the state's capital with a major Lake Erie port, providing an alternate coal route to the lakes. It was consolidated on 28 December 1893 with the Columbus, Shawnee & Hocking as the Columbus, Sandusky & Hocking. In 1902, the CS & H was divided up by the Pennsylvania and the Hocking Valley, with the Pennsy taking the segment north of the Cleveland-Akron-Columbus junction. They also took possession of this class of


Class D/G1 (Locobase 1135)

Data from Robert Schoenberg'sRaildata collection of Pennsylvania Railroad steam locomotive and from PRR Steam Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Vol 5, pp. 1.

William D Edson's All-Time Roster (originally produced in November 1994 by P Allen Copeland and supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley) reports that Baldwin built 241 from 1868 to 1873, distributed as follows: 1868 - 18; 1869 - 59; 1870 - 15; 1871 - 4; 1872 - 60; 1873 - 85; Pennsylvania shops produced 45 from 1868 to 1875.

One of the classes established by Alexander J. Cassatt after he became Master of Machinery. Duty was general freight service. G1A was slightly lighter at 82,590 lb. Built between 1868 and 1873.


Class E/G2 (Locobase 1136)

Data from diagram scanned in by Robert Schoenberg of http://prr.railfan.net . Built by Pennsylvania shops from 1869 to 1874 and 1881 to 1884. William D Edson's All-Time Roster (originally produced in November 1994 by P Allen Copeland and supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley) reports that production distributed as follows: 1869 - 6; 1870 - 12; 1871 - 14; 1872 - 38; 1873 - 8; 1874 - 20; for a total of 98. 1880s production added 97 to that total.

One of the classes established by Alexander J. Cassatt after he became Master of Machinery. Duty was heavy freight service in the mountains, for which the G1 (Locobase 1135) was modified with a larger firebox and smaller drivers.


Class G (Locobase 11501)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Vol 26, p. 243. Works numbers were 23768, 23779, 23872 in February 1904; 25250-25251 in March 1905; and 27602, 27618 in February 1906.

Delmarva-based Ten-wheelers that moved the traffic from Cape Charles to Delmar, Delaware.


Class G4A (Locobase 3176)

Data from diagram scanned in by Robert Schoenberg of http://prr.railfan.net . Unusually for this period, this design had a radial-stay firebox. 8 were later superheated, in the process being fitted with piston valves and Walschaerts valve gear.


Class G5s (Locobase 118)

Data from PRR Steam Locomotive Diagrams originally compiled by Robert Schoenberg and supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also Locobase 15847.

31 identical locos for the LIRR shown in Locobase 15847.

Like all Pennsys, this design had a Belpaire firebox. (See Locobase 32 for a comment on the unique design of Pennsy's Belpaire firebox.) According to Ziel, the Pennsy's William F. Kiesel Jr took the boiler of famed E-6 Atlantic and H-10 Consolidation and placed it on a 4-6-0 to produce "a brand-new locomotive, from the wheels up, intended specifically for rapid-acceleration commuter service."

The Railway Mechanical Engineer (RME) of January 1924 (pp 16-18) explains that local Pennsy traffic sometimes had to scale relatively steep grades. As traffic had grown over the previous decade, the railroad more frequently had to resort to double-heading its Atlantics.

As was usually the case with initial reports, RME reported the G5s was meeting exacting schedules and could run at 70 mph (113 km/h) because the counterbalancing allowed for such speeds on a relatively low-drivered machine.

Once in service for a while, however, the class was considered to be rough riding, hard on water, hard to fire, and not suited for heavy snow because of the low placement of the air pump. It may at first seem hard to square this set of criticisms with Edson's verdict (Keystone Steam & Electric, 1974) that they were "...very successful not only on the Pittsburgh Division, but also in New Jersey and on the Long Island Railroad, which bought 31 of their own." But given the high factor of adhesion that Edson observes "...was needed for good acceleration from numerous stops in such service,", the ill effects on the crew were apparently more than offset by the engine's ability to keep a schedule.

The class remained in service until the end of steam and several were preserved.


Class G5s (Locobase 15847)

Data from PRR Steam Locomotive Diagrams originally compiled by Robert Schoenberg and supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also Railway Mechanical Engineer (January 1924), pp. 16-18. Juniata works numbers were 3851 in January 1924, 3853-3855 in February, 3973-3976 in January 1925, 3978 in February, 4195-4199 in September 1928, 4200-4204 in October. 4207-4208 in July 1929. Altoona numbers picked up from that point as 4209-4213 in July 1929, 4214-4215 in August, 4216-4217 in September, and 4218 in November.

the Northeast Railfans website coverage of the restoration of the #39 at http://www.northeastrailfans.com/2013/03/19/railroad-museum-of-long-island-and-strasburg-railroad-sign-agreement-to-restore-ex-lirr-g5s-number-39/ and RMLI's Ron Fisher reprint of Ron Ziel's encomium to the G5s originally published in 1979 in Long Island Heritage, the G5 1924-1955 and reproduced on the Railway Preservation News's Forum at http://www.rypn.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=28282&start=0&st=0&sk=t&sd=a (last accesssed 9 May 2014).

The 90 built for Pennsy in 1923-1925 are described in Locobase 118. Like all Pennsys, this design had a Belpaire firebox. (See Locobase 32 for a comment on the unique design of Pennsy's Belpaire firebox.) According to Ziel, the Pennsy's William F. Kiesel Jr took the boiler of famed E-6 Atlantic and H-10 Consolidation and placed it on a 4-6-0 to produce "a brand-new locomotive, from the wheels up, intended specifically for rapid-acceleration commuter service."

The class was considered to be rough riding, hard on water, hard to fire, and not suited for heavy snow because of the low placement of the air pump. It may at first seem hard to square this set of criticisms with Edson's verdict (Keystone Steam & Electric, 1974) that they were "...very successful not only on the Pittsburgh Division, but also in New Jersey and on the Long Island Railroad, which bought 31 of their own." But given the high factor of adhesion that Edson observes "...was needed for good acceleration from numerous stops in such service,", the ill effects on the crew were apparently more than offset by the engine's ability to keep a schedule.

The class remained in service until the end of steam and several were preserved. On 15 March 2013, the Railroad Museum of Long Island and the Strasburg Railroad announced that the RMLI would attempt to raise $900,000 and transport Engine #39 to Strasburg, PA where the railroad will contribute more than $1,000,000 of its own money to restore the locomotive to running condition and operate it on the Strasburg.

In January 2014, the Oyster Bay Railroad Museum received grants to convert its railroad station building to a museum. This followed a $546,000 grant to support restoration of the museum's G5s #35, which was to be worked on by the Steam Operation Corporation of Muscle Shoals, Alabama.


Class GG-4/G34 (Locobase 9513)

Data from "Keegan's Ten Wheel Locomotive," Railway and Locomotive Engineering, August 1899, page 378. See also DeGolyer, Volume 22, pp. 75 and 237. Baldwin works numbers ran 16611-16614 in March 1899, 17506-17509 in February 1900.

This set of Ten-wheelers was designed by the GR & I's Master Mechanic James Keegan as dual-service engines. In the summer resort season, they pulled heavy passenger trains; at other times they hauled freight. In the latter capacity, they were described in freight service as "...doing exceptionally well." The latter four engines had 283 tubes (7 fewer than the first four) and a decreased tube heating surface area of 2,137 sq ft (198.53 sq m).

The railroad began as a lumber-exploiting line in Michigan that connected Grand Rapids with Cedar Springs (20 miles to the north) but eventually extended from Mackinaw City on the Straits of Mackinac to New Paris, Ohio, which was just a short distance from Cincinnati on the Pennsylvania.

According to Wikipedia, depletion of the northern Michigan forests in the 1880s prompted a successful transition to a tourism-based economy and the GR & I's nickname of "The Fishing Line" (Locobase wonders how long they cast about for slogans before that one hit.)


Class GG-4a / G34a (Locobase 12396)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines, 1903, as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Vol 22, p. 237. Works numbers were

17506-17509 in February 1900.

NB: Although the specs do not give the heating or grate surface areas, this design was identical to the 1904 Toledo, Peoria & Western locomotives described in Locbase 11509. the engines had the same tube count, diameter and length; the firebox dimensions were identical down to the quarter inch; weights and wheelbases too were identical. So Locobase concludes that the two batches were built 4 years apart to the same design.

Add to that that the TP & W and the GR & I operated very near each other.

The GG-4as would be taken into the Pennsylvania in 1920 when it took over the GR & I and would be renumbered. The first to be scrapped was 9555 in August 1923, followed by 9554 in December. 9595 was dismantled in May 1926 and 9536 in February 1928.


Class GG-4b/G-36s, G-37s (Locobase 11439)

Data from "Locomotive Building," The Railroad Gazette, Vol XLI, No 18 (11 November 1906), p 121. Works numbers were 42616, 42613-42615 in June 1907.

As delivered, these Ten-wheelers had a representive set of component suppliers, as shown in the table:

Air brakes Westinghouse American

Axles Steel to Penn RR requirements

Bell ringer "Little Giant"

Boiler lagging Keasbey & Mattlson

Brake-beams National-Hollow

Brake-shoes Company standard

Couplers Kelso

Headlights Star

Injectors Nathan and Simplex

Journal bearings Phosphor bronze

Piston rod packings United States

Valve rod packing American Locomotive Co.

Safety valve Kunkle

Sanding devices Leach

Sight-feed lubricators Nathan

Springs Union Spring Co.

Steam gauges Crosby

Steam heat equipment Company's standard

Tires, tender wheels Schoen steel

Tlres, driving and truck wheels Standard

All were renumbered in 1913 as 6, 10-12 in order of their purchase. They were superheated in 1915 (10, 12) and 1917 (11, 6) and taken into the Pennsy and renumbered 9534, 9537-9539.


Class VG6a / G26a (Locobase 5845)

Data from American Engineer and Railroad Journal (April 1896), p. 150. See also "Ten-Wheel Pittsburgh Compound for the Vandalia," Locomotive Engineering, Vol 9, No 2 (February 1896), p. 159. Works numbers were 1588-1589 in December 1895.

Builder information from B Rumary list supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004. Originally procured by the Terre Haute & Indianapolis and renumbered by them once. As 508-509, came under Vandalia control. The Vandalia Line, itself an amalgam of railroads principally including the TH & I, was taken into the Pennsylvania system in 1917.

This cross-compound design used the "Pittsburgh" system. "One feature of this system," said the anonymous author of the article,"is the independent exhaust from the high-pressure cylinder." Working simple at low speeds, the author goes on to explain, offers substantial benefits on those divisions of the line that have heavy grades "...as it permits the engine to take a heavier load over the limiting grade of the division, a load which can usually be easily handled on the remainder of the division."

Stacked against the other American TenWheelers of the decade, this design is about in the middle of the pack.


Class X/G3 (Locobase 1153)

Data from PRR Steam Locomotive Diagrams and "Classification and Description of Locomotives", Pennsylvania Railroad Company, May 1, 1902, supplied in May 2005 and August 2013, respectively, by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Used in passenger express service with heavy trains. As usual with Pennsy engines, this class had Belpaire boilers.

Most of the class was scrapped in 1922-1923.


Class X/G3 (Locobase 3175)

Data from diagram scanned in by Robert Schoenberg of http://prr.railfan.net . Belpaire firebox, considerable growth allowance suggested by the high factor of adhesion.

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class121/Godd131/G odd133/G odd15021503
Locobase ID11,642 12,071 12,373 2842 2843
RailroadWestern New York & Pennsylvania (PRR)Western New York & Pennsylvania (PRR)Western New York & Pennsylvania (PRR)Pennsylvania (PRR)Pennsylvania (PRR)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class62411
Road Numbers121-124/127-130/ 6263-6266131-132 / 6267-6268133-136 / 6269-62721503
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built62411
BuilderBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoSchenectady
Year18891893189918921892
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft)11.3311.501212.5013.25
Engine Wheelbase (ft)21.5021.7122.2124.1723.92
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.53 0.53 0.54 0.52 0.55
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)45.4246.1751.3549.70
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)35,50037,000
Weight on Drivers (lbs)89,00090,00088,000101,300108,500
Engine Weight (lbs)112,000116,000120,000132,000143,000
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)84,00073,00088,000
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)204,000205,000231,000
Tender Water Capacity (gals)30003300400036003500
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons) 7.508
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)4950495660
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)56.5056.50677274
Boiler Pressure (psi)160165180180180
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)18" x 24"19" x 24"19" x 26"14" x 24"20" x 24" (1)
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)24" x 24"30" x 24" (1)
Tractive Effort (lbs)18,71721,50721,43414,91613,741
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.76 4.18 4.11 6.79 7.90
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)158.20100150169.70184
Grate Area (sq ft)22.8028.8028.6028.2026.20
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)16711561165121352000
Superheating Surface (sq ft)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)16711561165121352000
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume236.40198.20193.50499.29458.37
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation36484752514850764716
Same as above plus superheater percentage36484752514850764716
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area25,31216,50027,00030,54633,120
Power L152484066565651286603
Power MT389.99298.80425.09334.81402.50

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class34/VG-5B/G25b71D/G1E/G2G
Locobase ID8881 12,042 1135 1136 11,501
RailroadTerre Haute & Indianapolis (PRR)Sandusky & Columbus Short Line (PRR)Pennsylvania (PRR)Pennsylvania (PRR)New York, Philadelphia & Norfolk (PRR)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class172861957
Road Numbers34/12/41/400/871371-77 / 7937-794425-31 / 6525-6531
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built172861957
BuilderPittsburghBurnham, Williams & CoseveralPRRBurnham, Williams & Co
Year18931892186818691904
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft)13.1214.6712.4212.6713.50
Engine Wheelbase (ft)23.672523.6723.6724.33
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.55 0.59 0.52 0.54 0.55
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)45.8345.83
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)20,80023,000
Weight on Drivers (lbs)108,46786,00059,20062,100116,420
Engine Weight (lbs)138,009112,00084,30084,800148,800
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)76,00051,40051,400120,000
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)214,009135,700136,200268,800
Tender Water Capacity (gals)47783600240024006650
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons)44
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)6048333565
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)7256565068
Boiler Pressure (psi)190150125125180
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)20" x 24"19" x 24"18" x 22"18" x 22"20" x 26"
Tractive Effort (lbs)21,53319,72613,52415,14723,400
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 5.04 4.36 4.38 4.10 4.98
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)130.4111095.97111.27142.70
Grate Area (sq ft)3222.3014.5016.3543.70
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)22351773109310962395
Superheating Surface (sq ft)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)22351773109310962395
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume256.11225.12168.68169.15253.34
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation60803345181320447866
Same as above plus superheater percentage60803345181320447866
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area24,77816,50011,99613,90925,686
Power L175434129283226566708
Power MT459.94317.54316.39282.87381.08

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassG4AG5sG5sGG-4/G34GG-4a / G34a
Locobase ID3176 118 15,847 9513 12,396
RailroadPennsylvania (PRR)Pennsylvania (PRR)Long Island (PRR)Grand Rapids & Indiana (PRR)Grand Rapids & Indiana (PRR)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class75903184
Road Numbers196120-5067-70, 28-29, 71, 9/9591-93, 9554-55, 9595, 953628-29, 71, 9/9554-9555. 9536, 9595
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built75903184
BuilderAltoonaJuniataJuniata & AltoonaBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & Co
Year18991924192418991900
Valve GearStephensonWalschaertWalschaertStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft)13.1014.2514.2513.5013.50
Engine Wheelbase (ft)25.4226.5026.5024.3324.33
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.52 0.54 0.54 0.55 0.55
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)56.1064.9464.94
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)48,00063,00063,000
Weight on Drivers (lbs)138,000178,000178,000101,530100,000
Engine Weight (lbs)182,000237,000237,000134,330135,000
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)51,400176,000176,00090,00085,000
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)233,400413,000413,000224,330220,000
Tender Water Capacity (gals)80007800780045004500
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons)11131310
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)7799995656
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)6868686262
Boiler Pressure (psi)225205205200200
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)20" x 28"24" x 28"24" x 28"19" x 26"19" x 26"
Tractive Effort (lbs)31,50041,32841,32825,73625,736
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.38 4.31 4.31 3.95 3.89
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)162177177153162
Grate Area (sq ft)3155.1955.192828
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)28142855285523272284
Superheating Surface (sq ft)613613
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)28143468346823272284
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume276.39194.74194.74272.73267.69
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation697511,31411,31456005600
Same as above plus superheater percentage697513,35013,35056005600
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area36,45042,81642,81630,60032,400
Power L1907714,67014,67074907494
Power MT435.03545.09545.09487.91495.64

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassGG-4b/G-36s, G-37sVG6a / G26aX/G3X/G3
Locobase ID11,439 5845 1153 3175
RailroadGrand Rapids & Indiana (PRR)Terre Haute & Peoria (PRR)Pennsylvania (PRR)Pennsylvania (PRR)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class422321
Road Numbers101-104/9534, 9537-9539258-259 / 508-509 / 8987-8988
GaugeStdStdStdStd
Number Built422321
BuilderAlco-PittsburghPittsburghAltoonaFt Wayne
Year1907189518921892
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft)1111.8311.83
Engine Wheelbase (ft)21.6723.0423.04
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.51 0.51 0.51
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft)49.7951.1551.12
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs)39,05039,050
Weight on Drivers (lbs)126,000101,000112,550112,550
Engine Weight (lbs)165,000127,000138,000138,000
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs)78,70073,00051,400
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs)205,700211,000189,400
Tender Water Capacity (gals)6000400039003900
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons)12 7.50 7.50
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd)70566363
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in)68566868
Boiler Pressure (psi)200180180180
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)20" x 26"19" x 26" (1)19" x 24"19" x 24"
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in)29" x 26" (1)
Tractive Effort (lbs)26,00017,94219,49419,494
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.85 5.63 5.77 5.77
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft)152146.95146.40
Grate Area (sq ft)462431.3230.78
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft)2800180519011902
Superheating Surface (sq ft)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft)2800180519011902
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume296.18423.11241.37241.50
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation9200432056385540
Same as above plus superheater percentage9200432056385540
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area27,36026,45126,352
Power L1433668276823
Power MT283.94401.18400.95

The G5s class was used for both fast and slow freight and passanger service. They were never built by the hundreds as were most other Pennsy wheel arrangments. Most early models were freight haulers capable of out-pulling the standard American (4-4-0) type. Later designs matured into fast pasenger service.

None of the Pennsy 4-6-0 Standard Designs were built between the years 1901 and 1923. However, there were a few odds and ends scattered about. Two examples were operated by the Long Island Rail Road and Grand Rapids & Indiana.

In the year 1924, the Pennsy locomotive inventory listed 164 Ten-Wheelers for passenger service and four for freight service. This was a period of change for the 4-6-0 as the new G5s class was being built by Juniata. The 4-6-0 might have well been developed into larger, high speed machines for use along level sections, but the railroad preferred to build 4-4-2s instead. All were built with superheaters and power reverse gear, but never got stokers or feedwater heaters.

Reference


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