California Northwestern / Central Pacific / El Paso & Northeastern / El Paso & Southwestern / Florence & Cripple Creek / Las Vegas & Tonopah / Nevada-California-Oregon / North Pacific Coast / Northwestern Pacific / San Antonio & Aransas Pass / San Diego & Arizona / San Diego & Southeastern / San Francisco & North Pacific / South Pacific / Southern Pacific / Texas & New Orleans 4-6-0 "Ten-wheeler" Locomotives of the USA


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class 103 / T-43 (Locobase 8177)

Data from the NWP 10 - 1950 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See the excellent roster on http://ncespee.railfan.net/rosters/oldnwptxtros.html, access 9 February 2007. Works numbers were 3303-3304 in 1901 (road numbers assigned in reverse order).

Although built as a pair, these two came to the NWP from different predecessors. 103 entered service as San Francisco & North Pacific #20 while 104 began its career as California Northwestern #31. 103 was scrapped in 1935, followed by 104 in 1906.


Class 105 / T-57 (Locobase 8178)

Data from the NWP 10 - 1950 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See the excellent roster on http://ncespee.railfan.net/rosters/oldnwptxtros.html, access 9 February 2007. Works numbers were 25620-25621 in April 1901.

These two Ten-wheelers entered service in San Francisco & North Pacific #21 and California Northwestern #32. The latter later acquired as SF & NP #25. Once they operated under NWP's herald, they ran until 1934.


Class 109 / T-57 (Locobase 8180)

Data from the NWP 10 - 1950 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See the excellent roster on http://ncespee.railfan.net/rosters/oldnwptxtros.html, access 9 February 2007. Works number was 18179 in September 1900.

This was C & NW's #1 engine. The lead locomotive later was renumbered 30 by the C & NW. As the Northwestern Pacific's 109, this low-drivered Ten-wheeler remained in service until 1948.

Locobase suspects that NWP 110 (works #17759 in May 1900) was built to the same design; it served the San Francisco & North Pacific as #20 and retired from the NWP in 1937.


Class 111 / T-46 (Locobase 8181)

Data from the NWP 10 - 1950 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See the excellent roster on http://ncespee.railfan.net/rosters/oldnwptxtros.html, access 9 February 2007. Works numbers were 44955-44958 in February 1908.

A rare batch of locomotives to the same design that totalled more than two on a Redwood Empire road, this quartet was among the first purchases made by the NWP after it opened shop in 1907. The class reproduced the same power dimensions of most other NWP Ten-wheelers, but offered a slightly bigger boiler and firebox.

In March 2013, Dennis Betts emailed steamlocomotive.com and Locobase to tell us that his father Orille Betts was killed when 114 collided head-on with Southern Pacific C-9s class Consolidation 2801 (Locobase 7279) on 30 September 1946 at Dos Rios, Calif.

Two others of the class were scrapped in the late 1940s (111 in 1949, 113 in 1947), but 112 survived as a museum piece and eventually became part of the California State Railroad Museum's roundhouse.


Class 130 / T-47 & T-48 (Locobase 8182)

Data from the NWP 10 - 1950 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See the excellent roster on http://ncespee.railfan.net/rosters/oldnwptxtros.html, access 9 February 2007. Works numbers were 49089-49092 in November 1910 and 51536-51537 in July 1912.

Substantially bigger than earlier NWP Ten-wheelers (whether purchased directly for the road or acquired with the amalgamation of other lines), this sextet consisted of four engines produced in 1910 and two more 51536-51537) in 1912. Even though the cylinders were larger, the boilers were larger still. The grate and firebox didn't grow much at all and may have represented a constraint on free steaming.

Was this why the first four were scrapped in 1938 and the later 2 in 1940, or did the taller drivers prove less suitable to the route profiles of the Redwood Empire Route?


Class 136 / T-49 (Locobase 8184)

Data from the NWP 10 - 1950 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See the excellent roster on http://ncespee.railfan.net/rosters/oldnwptxtros.html, access 9 February 2007. Works numbers were 54578-54579, 54975 in 1914.

Just before Alco delivered the superheated trio shown in Locobase 8185, they produced this saturated-steam threesome that apparently never were superheated. Thus, this set serves as the "before" picture for the 139s, which came after.

All three of this class were scrapped in 1940, doubtless because in a shrinking system, the least efficient engines would be first to go.


Class 139 / T-51 (Locobase 8185)

Data from the NWP 10 - 1950 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See the excellent roster on http://ncespee.railfan.net/rosters/oldnwptxtros.html, access 9 February 2007. Works numbers were 54976-54978 in 1914.

Alco built this trio in a single batch-. They immediately followed the last of the 136 trio (Locobase 8184), which had a saturated boiler and immediately preceded the larger 180s (Locobase 8189).

They were moderately-sized, mixed-traffic Ten-wheelers that were apparently all the Redwood Empire Route needed because the railway asked Baldwin for two more eight years later. See Locobase 8191.

139 went out of service first, being scrapped in 1947. 141 was scrapped outright in 1954 while 140 was converted to a stationary boiler.


Class 142 / T-51 (Locobase 8191)

Data from the NWP 10 - 1950 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Vol 71, pp. 123+. Works numbers were 55356 in April and 55473 in June 1922.

Eight years after Alco delivered three of this Ten-wheeler passenger design (Locobase 8185), the NWP went to Baldwin for two more just like them. Piston valves measured 11" (279 mm) in diameter.

Locobase records the note written into the specs that read as follows: "Ry, Co approves placing boiler for 10 34 D 1143 [Baldwin's designator for the first locomotive of the two], 3/4" further forward than for 10 34 D 1144." It's an example of the high level of detail that both the railroad and the builder felt was important to bring to the construction of a steam locomotive. It's also worth noting that the boiler tubes were provided to Baldwin by the NWP.

Delivered one at a time, the pair served the Redwood Empire Route until 1953.


Class 160/180 /T-57 (Locobase 8189)

Data from the NWP 10 - 1950 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See the excellent roster on http://ncespee.railfan.net/rosters/oldnwptxtros.html, access 9 February 2007. Works numbers were 54979-54980 in 1914.

1914 saw the NWP acquire the most locomotives of any year when it bought twelve. Among them was a string of Ten-wheelers that was completed by this pair of freighters. Slightly larger than the three 63" passenger engines that immediately preceded them on the Alco production line (Locobase 8185), the two sported the biggest grates on the NWP and the biggest boilers.

Eight years later, Baldwin would deliver 3 more. See Locobase 8190.


Class 178 (Locobase 8187)

Data from the NWP 10 - 1950 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See the excellent roster on http://ncespee.railfan.net/rosters/oldnwptxtros.html, access 9 February 2007. Works number was 29726 in December 1906.

Built for the Bullfrog & Goldfield as their #13, this Ten-wheeler was a bit bigger than the #20 described in Locobase 7276. After a wreck in August 1908, the locomotive was rebuilt as #11 (possibly prompted by a triskadecaphobic impulse). In 1917, 11 came into NWP hands and was renumbered.

In its superheated form the 178 operated until scrapped in January 1954.


Class 1785 (Locobase 11122)

Data from Schenectady Locomotive Works, Illustrated Catalogue of Simple and Compound Locomotives (Philadelphia: J B Lippincott, 1897), pp. 76-77.

Another of Albert J Pitkin's 2-cylinder cross compounds (see Locobase 10803 for a description of the intercepting valve), this engine had a longer stroke than the first trial horses. It was built to compare economies with the identically constructed 1787, except that the latter used simple expansion.


Class 179 (Locobase 8188)

Data from the NWP 10 - 1950 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See the excellent roster on http://ncespee.railfan.net/rosters/oldnwptxtros.html, access 9 February 2007.

This Ten-wheeler entered service on the LV & T as #12 and seems to have been one of its largest engines. When the Northwestern Pacific absorbed that railroad, it renumbered the locomotive 129. After a later upgrade with superheater, the NWP then gave it 179. The superheater installation in the 179 ranked among the largest of all such configurations on a North American locomotive.

As 179 it carried on until the early 1950s.


Class 18 (Locobase 8174)

Data from the NWP 10 - 1950 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information on the provenance of the locomotive from http://ncespee.railfan.net/rosters/oldnwptxtros.html, a Northwestern Pacific roster by John Barnhill, Jr, last accessed 22 September 2007. This engine was Brooks works number 3418 in January 1900.

The original order for this locomotive, shown in Railway Age, Volume 28 (1 September 1899), p. 654 , stated that the boiler would hold 184 two-inch tubes and loaded engine weight would reach 85,000 lb (38,555 kg). So the specs shown in this entry likely refer to a later boiler.

The NPC roster shown in PacificNG.com at http://www.pacificng.com/template.php?page=roads/ca/npc/rosters/locomotive.htm (last accessed 31 August 2014) says that this was the largest three-foot gauge locomotive then in service. But Locobase itself has over a dozen Ten-wheeler classes alone that were delivered before the 18 that had higher engine weights.


Class 182 / T-57 (Locobase 8190)

Data from the NWP 10 - 1950 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also DeGolyer, Vol 71, pp. 129+. See the excellent roster on http://ncespee.railfan.net/rosters/oldnwptxtros.html, access 9 February 2007. Works numbers were 55351 in April 1922; 55470 in May and 55471 in June.

In 1922, Baldwin delivered five Ten-wheelers to the NWP. Two (Locobase 8191) reproduced the 63"-drivered passenger locomotives originally produced in 1914 by Alco (Locobase 8185). This trio supplemented Alco's pair of 57"-driver freight engines, also from 1914 (Locobase 8189).

Locobase finds the sequence of 4-6-0 acquisition by this road a bit confusing, but can say the set of freight engines seemed to served the Redwood Empire's logging interests effectively until dieselization.


Class 20 / T-44 (Locobase 8179)

Data from the NWP 10 - 1950 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection and DeGolyer, Volume 23, p. 27 and Volume 26, p. 272. See also the excellent roster on http://ncespee.railfan.net/rosters/oldnwptxtros.html, access 9 February 2007. Works numbers were 17759 in May 1900, 18179 in September; 23933, 23951 in March 1904.

Baldwin delivered the first pair of Ten-wheelers to the CN RR in 1900 and the second in 1904. The 1900 spec called for the tubes to be "placed in vertical rows not less than 2 3/4" [70 mm] center to center with free vertical spaces betwen rows."

The second of the two locomotives was originally to have been numbered 20, but an inked correction changed it to a 1.22-23 were delivered directly to CN's parent, the San Francisco & North Pacific.

Although 107 and 110 left service along with many other NWP engines in the late 1930s (1937), 109 and 108 held on until 1948.


Class 20/T-57 (Locobase 7276)

Data from the SD&A 5 - 1921 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See Locobase 7271 for a summary of Richard V. Dodge's account of the construction of the SD & A.

Gotta love any railway known as the Bullfrog & Goldfield; was it a Mark Twain creation? That was the railroad that took delivery of the 14 (works number was 29727) in December 1906. Renumbered 12 in 1908, the engine's boiler exploded in on 19 December 1910. It's not clear in what condition the 12 presented itself when the B&G sold it to the San Diego & Arizona.

Renumbered 20, the Ten-wheeler remained in service for decades. In 1920, the SD&A gave it a new, superheated boiler; the specifications refer to this incarnation. The boiler provided an impressive amount of superheat and doubtless enhanced its value.

In 1942, the Espee took the 20 for war work and renumbered it 3285, leasing it back in 1943. Returned to the SD &AE in 1948, the 20 retired in June 1950 and was scrapped 3 months later.

Obviously a useful engine, 20/3285 served until 1950 when it was scrapped.

(Another B & G Ten-wheeler went to the Northwestern Pacific; see Locobase 8187.)


Class 201 / T-38 (Locobase 7248)

Data from the SA&AP 6 - 1917 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. (See Locobase 7235 for a description of this Southeast Texas railroad.) Works numbers were 32515-32516 in December 1907; 32549-32550, 32583-32584, 32642-32643 in January 1908.

An octet of small Ten-wheelers came to the SA&AP for mixed-traffic service. Interestingly, the Railroad Gazette's "Locomotive Building" for 18 October 1907 (p. 471) reported that Baldwin was building Pacifics. They did note the "special equipment" suppliers, the list of which helps flesh out the industrial complex that contributed to building Baldwin steam locomotives in that year:

Air brakes Westinghouse

Boiler lagging Keasbey & Mattlson

Brake-beams Carnegie

Couplers Janney

Headlights Lyle National electric

Injector Nathan

Journal bearings Ajax bronze

Piston rod packings Jerome metallic

Valve rod packings Jerome metallic

Safety valve Crosby

Sanding devices Leach

Sight-feed lubricators Nathan

Springs Standard Steel Works

Tires, driving wheels Midvale

The entire class was taken up by the Texas & New Orleans when that railroad bought the SA & AP in 1925 and placed in the T-38 class. 374 was scrapped in March 1930 and 371 followed in February 1934, but the rest of the class lasted longer before going to the ferro-knacker in January 1937.


Class 21 / 10 (Locobase 7274)

Data from the SD&A 5 - 1921 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See Locobase 7271 for a summary of Richard V. Dodge's account of the construction of the SD & A.

When the SD & A bought the SD & SE (see Locobase 7273) in 1916, three Ten-wheelers came with the railway. One of them was this product of an earlier age (works #2470) that Locobase suspects came from yet another railroad sometime before. The SD & A numbering included 21 (possibly the number it came with), which soon changed to 10. As #10, the locomotive lasted another two decades before it was scrapped in 1938.


Class 22 (Locobase 11606)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Vol 15, p. 54

Works numbers were 9929 in April 1889.


Class 22 / 11 (Locobase 7275)

Data from the SD&A 5 - 1921 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See Locobase 7271 for a summary of Richard V. Dodge's account of the construction of the SD & A.

When the San Diego & Arizona bought the SD & SE (see Locobase 7273) in 1916, three Ten-wheelers came with the railway. This particular engine (works #2883) was 35 years old when it went to the SD & A, having entered service on some railroad in 1881. Its advanced age meant that it was one of the first to be scrapped, leaving service in 1925.


Class 320 / T-39 (Locobase 7249)

Data from the SA&AP 6 - 1917 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. (See Locobase 7235 for a description of this SouthEast Texas railroad.) Works number was 32369 in December 1907.

This single Ten-wheeler arrived on the SA & AP in 1908 having been supplied from "stock", according to Baldwin's records.

It was taken in by the Texas & New Orleans in 1925, which gave it a new number. Its small grate may have meant less in terms of total evaporative capability given that it was an oil burner; however its firebox still ranked on the small side. Perhaps because it was a one-only also contributed to its relatively early scrapping in March 1930.


Class 4 / T-52, T-58 (Locobase 8186)

Data from the NWP 10 - 1950 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works numbers were 30105-30107 in February 1907, 31093-31094 in June, 32250-32251 in November, and 32360 in December

4, 5, & 8 were taken over by the NWP and renumbered; the trio apparently was never superheated. The 6 went to the Tonopah & Tidewater; it blew up in 1929. After a rebuild, it was sold to the Six Counties Railroad. A sister engine, #7, went to the San Diego & Arizona (see Locobase 7277), where it did receive a superheater. 9-11 also went to the SD & A when the LV & T was abandoned in 1919; it's not clear if any of these were superheated. They were renumbered 25-27.

171 was scrapped first in 1946, 172 followed in 1948, and 170 was gone in 1950. On the SD & A, the 25 was scrapped in 1940, 26 went to the Espee in the same year and renumbered 2386, and 27 was formally absorbed by the SP in 1946, but never renumbered. 27 was scrapped in November 1950.


Class 52 (Locobase 7701)

Data from CC&CS 1912 Locomotive DiagramRaildata collection supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

See Locobase 7700 for a bried history of the F & CC. Locobase suspects that these Ten-wheelers were based on the same basic firebox and boiler as the Consolidations shown in 7700. Like the 2-8-0s, this class had long afterlives following the dissolution of the F & CC. When the Cripple Creek & Colorado Southern took over the F & CC's trackage, they sold two of these engines to the Nevada-California-Oregon Railway as their numbers 22 & 23. 23 was retired in 1921, but 22 was sold to the Southern Pacific in 1929 and operated under the Espee's aegis for another two decades.

Meanwhile, F & CC's #20 Portland (works# 5007) went to the Rio Grande Southern in 1916 as their 20 (N). After a long career with that railroad, 20 (N) was sold to the Sierra Mountain Railroad Club for museum display.


Class 7 (Locobase 12673)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Volume 25, p. 258. Roster information from http://www.urbaneagle.com/nco/nco-loco-roster.html, accessed 3 September 2007. works numbers were 2012, 22020 in April 1903

According to Slim Rails' account of the NCO (http://www.urbaneagle.com/nco/), the "Northern California Outrage" didn't shrink from a challenge, as its nickname - the Sierra Nevada Route -- and its other nickname -- the Narrow, Crooked & Ornery -- will suggest. It connected Reno, Nev with Oregon. Aimed to reach The Dalles in Oregon, the last spike went down in Lakeview, Ore, 241 miles from Reno.

This pair of Ten-wheelers set the tone of locomotive purchases for the N-C-O.


Class 7 / T-58 (Locobase 7277)

Data from the SD&A 5 - 1921 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See Locobase 7271 for a summary of Richard V. Dodge's account of the construction of the SD & A.

As far as Locobase can be sure, the LV & T had 4 Ten-wheelers, numbered 4, 5, 7, & 8. Three of them were sold to the Northwestern Pacific. That trio -- which was never superheated -- is described in Locobase 8186.

The information in the specs for this current entry, however, reflects a rebuilding by Southern Pacific shops after the San Diego & Arizona bought four Ten-wheelers from the LV & T in 1921. Three had 63" drivers (see Locobase 7278), one (works #31093 in June 1907) had freight-service, 57" drivers. This single engine served the SD & A and the SD & AE (once the Espee bought it in 1926) until 1940.


Class 9 / T-58 (Locobase 7278)

Data from the SD&A 5 - 1921 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See Locobase 7271 for a summary of Richard V. Dodge's account of the construction of the SD & A.

The information in the specs reflects a rebuilding by Southern Pacific shops after the San Diego & Arizona bought four Ten-wheelers from the LV & T in 1921. As noted in Locobase 7277, one had freight-service, 57" drivers (Locobase 7276).The other three were mixed-traffic engines that had been delivered as a pair (works #32250-32251 in November 1907) and a single (works #32360 in December 1907).

25 was scrapped in 1940. 26 was taken into the Espee for war work and renumbered 2386. Nominally returned to the SD & AE in 1948, the 26 operated on Espee rails until its scrapping in 1951. 27 went to the scrapper in 1950.


Class Alamogordo (Locobase 12258)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Volume 21, p. . Works numbers were 15726-15728 in February 1898.

The three engines bought by the New Mexico Railway & Coal Company for the EP & NE were named Alamogordo, La Luz, and Tularosa. The EP & NE became the El Paso & Northwestern in 1904 and these engines were renumbered.

In October 1920 (111) and January 1921 (109-110), the EP & SW sold the trio to the Nacional de Mexico where they ran until 1930.


Class DB / T-2 (Locobase 3196)

Data from SP Menke All-Time Steam Loco Diagrams and SP 1 - 1898 Pacific Division Locomotive Classes supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. According to a compilation of Cooke locomotives by B.Rumary (25 Kingscombe, Gurney Slade, Radstock, BA3 4TH, ENGLAND) and supplied to Locobase by Allen Stanley in March 2004, the Cooke works numbers were 2267-2280 and the class was built in May 1893.

Locobase pieced together the origins of this class through the Rumary list and the 1898 Classes description (which run only through 1896). The revision date of 5/1/30 in Menke may well represent the very last appearance of this class.


Class DC / T-1 / T-25 (Locobase 3155)

Information from The Roseville Historical Society's Coalition for the Relocation of Locomotive 2252. See also "Heavy Ten-wheeler for the Southern Pacific", Railroad & Locomotive Engineering, Volume 8, p. 434-435

2252 was one of 32 Ten-wheelers built for the Southern Pacific over several years. The first 22 were produced by Cooke Locomotive Works in Paterson, NJ and numbered 1808-1829. Cooke finished the class with 9 more (1838-1846). These batches were later renumbered 2235-56, 2257-64, and 2265-73, respectively, in 1901. The identical T-3s, which were built by Schenectady, but delivered as compounds, and riding on 69" drivers, are shown in Locobase 8735.

According to a compilation of Cooke locomotives by B.Rumary (25 Kingscombe, Gurney Slade, Radstock, BA3 4TH, ENGLAND) and supplied to Locobase by Allen Stanley in March 2004, the Cooke works numbers were as follows:

2299-2314 (February-June 1895); road #1808-1823

2340-2344 (July 1896); road #1829-1832.

2360-2364 (March 1897); road #1838-1842

2387-2391 (February 1898); road #1847-1851.

The R & LE report noted that the engines would pull both freight and passenger train on "...their mountain grades, and are remarkably good all-around engines."

They began their careers as freight helpers on the Donner Pass and later moved into secondary service. In 1929, four of the class were modified as "fire train" or "water train" motive power to battle wildfires started by other steam locomotives. The fire train engines lasted the longest, only being retired in 1955.

NB: The firebox heating surface is calculated by subtracting the boiler tube heating surface (which is given in the specs) from the total heating surface (also given in the specs). This matches up with the data found in the SP Menke All-Time Steam Loco Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.


Class DF - 57"" / T-6 (Locobase 8736)

Data from SP Menke All-Time Steam Loco Diagrams and SP 1 - 1898 Pacific Division Locomotive Classes supplied in May 2005 by Allen tanley from his extensive collection.

The long stroke on this class of freight Ten-wheelers got Locobase's attention. It was unusual for a 4-6-0 to have this ratio of diameter to stroke. Perhaps the explanation lies in these be "home-grown". The Sacramento Shops built 17 for Central Pacific lines and 5 for the SP's Pacific Division in two driver diameters. This entry shows the 57"; the 63" version is found at Locobase 8737.

The SP's T-6 diagram shows only the 57" version. Its low drivers conferred what tractive effort could be mgenerated on 135 psi, bu the small boiler limited steaming capability.


Class DF - 63"" / T-6 (Locobase 8737)

Data from SP Menke All-Time Steam Loco Diagrams and SP 1 - 1898 Pacific Division Locomotive Classes supplied in May 2005 by Allen tanley from his extensive collection.

Locobase 8736 shows the version of this home-built class as fitted with 57"drivers. The Sacramento Shops turned out more 63" engines. In 1896, their road numbers included 1765-67, 1770-1772, 1775-1778, 1780-1781, and 1783. All were later renumbered and the Menke diagram shows only the 57" version because that was the only surviving engine in 1930.


Class DH / T-8a (Locobase 8738)

Data from SP Menke All-Time Steam Loco Diagrams and SP 1 - 1898 Pacific Division Locomotive Classes supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

As delivered, these locomotives appear to have had the heating surface areas shown in the specifications. The Menke book shows two versions, the T-8a outlined above, and T-8, which had 206 tubes, a total heating surface of 1,343 sq ft including a firebox heating surface of 113 sq ft, and higher weights of 99,000 lb on the drivers and 121,800 overall. There are several explanations for the difference, but Locobase is unable to sort them out.

One of the locomotives was originally credited to the Central Pacific and the other 9 to the Southern Pacific's Pacific Division.


Class DI / T-9 (Locobase 8739)

Data from SP Menke All-Time Steam Loco Diagrams and SP 1 - 1898 Pacific Division Locomotive Classes supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

In the Pacific Division book, which has a closing date of August 1896, the class is shown with 56" drivers (49" centers) while the Menke diagrams show 57" drivers. In any case, the weights are identical. Two of the class -- later designated T-9b and bearing the numbers 2170 & 2172, had 170-psi boilers with 222 2" tubes measuring 11 ft 10 7/8" that, together with a firebox area of 124 sq ft, amounted to 1,491 sq ft of total heating surface. They put 92,000 lb on their drivers and had a total engine weight of 116,650 lb.


Class DJ / T-10 (Locobase 8740)

Data from SP Menke All-Time Steam Loco Diagrams and SP 1 - 1898 Pacific Division Locomotive Classes supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Whenever these Rhodies came on the Central Pacific and Southern Pacific rails, they were different from most of the Ten-wheelers then being purchased by the SP Lines. Unlike the others, these engines had their firebox dropped deep between the last two axles, spreading them out more than 3 feet. The firebox itself encompassed more area.


Class DW (Locobase 12680)

Data from SP Menke All-Time Steam Loco Diagrams and supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works numbers were 22692, 22719-20 in August 1903; 22815, 22829, 22837 in September; 22986-87, 23046, 23077in October.

These had the wider fireboxes of the post-Turn-of-the-Century Ten-wheeler.

They were later superheated by the shops; see Locobase 8745.


Class DZ-1 / T-69 / T-26 (Locobase 12559)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Volume 24, p.85. Works numbers were 19900-19903 in December 1901; 19965-66, 19987 in January 1902; and 20001-02, 20023-20031 in February 1902.

These were delivered as long-stroke Vauclain compound Consolidations with 15 1/2" HP and 26" LP cylinders. In 1923, two were converted to the simple-expansion layout shown in Locobase 8345.

The four that retained their Vauclain-compound layout were retired in 1927-1928.


Class Eureka / T-55 (Locobase 8176)

Data from the NWP 10 - 1950 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See the excellent roster on http://ncespee.railfan.net/rosters/oldnwptxtros.html, access 9 February 2007.

This was first SF & NP's #15, bearing the name Eureka. As the Northwestern Pacific's 102, it operated until 1929.


Class Skaggs / T-57 (Locobase 8175)

Data from the NWP 10 - 1950 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See the excellent roster on http://ncespee.railfan.net/rosters/oldnwptxtros.html, access 9 February 2007.

The SF & NP took possession of this Ten-wheeler (works #4212) as the Skaggs, road number #18. Renumbered by the Northwestern Pacific after its acquisition of the SF & NP in 1907, the 101 operated only until 1928.


Class T-16 (Locobase 11131)

Data from Schenectady Locomotive Works, Illustrated Catalogue of Simple and Compound Locomotives (Philadelphia: J B Lippincott, 1897), pp. 102-103.


Class T-22 (Locobase 8744)

Data from SP Menke All-Time Steam Loco Diagrams and SP 1 - 1898 Pacific Division Locomotive Classes supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Piecing together the information from a variety of sources, we find that this locomotive came on the Central Pacific in 1868. At the time, it was CPRR #68 and named PEOQUOP. Later it was designated DV and numbered 1536 and still later redesignated T-22 and numbered 2001. Locobase suspects that somewhere along the line, the original boiler was replaced. It later operated on the SP's Tillamook branch in Oregon.


Class T-23 (Locobase 8745)

Data from SP Menke All-Time Steam Loco Diagrams and supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

The original saturated-boiler version of this class entered service in 1903; see Locobase 12680. Sometime later, the Espee shops sacrificed 43 tubes to make room for the large flues that held the superheater elements. The class was also rebuilt with new heavy frames, possibly to absorb the increased power of the pistons. A later update added a Worthington 3-BL feed water heater on the right side only.

The 2309 had only 182 tubes that were 4 3/4" (121 mm) longer, but was equipped with a bigger firebox of 191 sq ft; (17.44 sq m); total evaporative heating surface was 1,966 sq ft (182.65 sq m).

Half the class was scrapped in the early '50s while the others were sold to FC del Pacifico in December 1951 and operated for that railway for another four years.


Class T-25 (Locobase 4134)

Data from SP Menke All-Time Steam Loco Diagrams and supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

According to a compilation of Cooke locomotives by B.Rumary (25 Kingscombe, Gurney Slade, Radstock, BA3 4TH, ENGLAND) and supplied to Locobase by Allen Stanley in March 2004, works numbers were 2632-2639 (March 1901).


Class T-26 (Locobase 8746)

Data from SP Menke All-Time Steam Loco Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Baldwin supplied these as 4-cylinder Vauclain compounds with 15 1/2" HP and 26" LP cylinders and a 28" stroke; see Locobase 12559.

The class was simpled and superheated. About half were scrapped in the 1930s with several others going to the Northwestern Pacific on lease in the postwar 1940s. All had been scrapped by 1950.


Class T-27 (Locobase 8674)

Data from T&NO 3 - 1932 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

This set of Ten-wheelers was delivered from both Cooke (Paterson, NJ) and Schenectady in March, July, and August 1897. They apparently were never superheated.


Class T-28 (Locobase 4212)

Data from Railroad Age Gazette,18 September 1908; see also "Ten Wheel Passenger Locomotive," American Engineer and Railroad Journal, Volume 81, No 12 (December 1907), pp. 480-481. Works numbers were 31611 in August 1907; 31649, 31696-31698, 31733, 31751-31752, 31781, 31792-31795, 31796,31838 in September; 31848, 31882-31883, 31946, 31979 in October; 32251 in November; 33744-33747 in September 1909; 36161-36162 in February 1911; 36186-36189 in March; 38221-38224 in August 1912; and 38250-38255 in September.

Built by Baldwin (30 for the Espee) and Brooks (12 for the Espee) in 1908 & 1911. These ten-wheelers ruled the mountains, according to the RAG article that profiled them. Running between Sacramento and Sparks, Nevada, the railroad offered adverse grades of 2-2.2% eastbound and 2% westbound. A typical train for this class consisted of a maximum of 7 cars weighing a total of 350-375 tons. The view from such a train must have been spectacular and the customer had plenty of time to take it in -- the booked trip average was 15.5 mph eastbound, 19.5 mph westbound with the Overland Limited.

"The new engines are performing very satisfactory service, " said RAG. "They ride easily, take the curves very steadily, and are good steamers." Indeed they were and the Espee took delivery of more of the same for the next 4 years, including 12 for the Texas & Louisiana affiliate. They had 12"-diameter piston valves

The class only entered retirement beginning in 1949 and even then, the Espee sold some to its Mexican affiliate FC del Pacifico.


Class T-28 - superheated (Locobase 8672)

Data from SP 7 - 1951 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Locobase 4212 describes these mountain-climbing Ten-wheelers as they came into service in 1907. A few engines were superheated with higher-pressure boilers and given 69" drivers and redesignated T-29 to reflect the increased tractive effort. Several years later, the 63" drivers were restored, which increased tractive effort still more, but triggered a reversion of designation to T-28 (probably to avoid confusion with other T-38s). See Locobase 8673 for the Texas & New Orleans variant with 69" drivers.


Class T-28 T&NO - superheated (Locobase 8673)

Data from SP 7 - 1951 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Locobase 4212 describes these mountain-climbing Ten-wheelers as they came into service in 1907 and Locobase 8672 shows the freight variant that eventually served the T&NO's parent Southern Pacific. On the Texas lines, however, the 69" driver, while reducing tractive effort, allowed for higher speeds.


Class T-3 (Locobase 8735)

Data from SP Menke All-Time Steam Loco Diagrams and SP 1 - 1898 Pacific Division Locomotive Classes supplied in May 2005 by Allen tanley from his extensive collection.

This class of passenger Ten-wheelers used the same boiler and firebox as the Cooke freighters described in Locobase 3155, but the 1898 book indicates that they were delivered as compounds (20" HP, 29" LP with a common stroke of 26"). They were later rebuilt to the simple-expansion version shown in the specs.


Class T-31 (Locobase 3164)

Information from William P Schneider article featured on the San Diego Railroad Museum's website. http://www.sdrm.org/roster/steam/s-2353/ (confirmed 4 Jan 2003) and SP Menke All Time Steam Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works numbers were 38221-38224 in August 1912, 38250-38255 in September.

This class of Ten-Wheelers served mostly local and secondary passenger runs in the Pacific Lines area of the Southern Pacific. Unlike earlier classes, these were delivered with superheaters. They were delivered with a working pressure of 200 psi, which was later increased to 210 psi.

Handy in size and possessing a healthy tractive effort, the T-31s continued in passenger service into the 1940s. The class leader later transferred to San Francisco for freight and switching service. After its retirement, it stood for 29 years in the Mid-Winter Fairgrounds in Imperial. Restoration to service began in 1987 and the engine's first run came in 1996.


Class T-32 (Locobase 8747)

Data from SP Menke All Time Steam Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Sharing the boiler design with Baldwin's T-31s (Locobase 3164), this set consisted of 8 Brooks engines from 1913 and 14 from the SP shops in 1917-1920. They rolled on taller drivers and weighed a bit more, but were otherwise very similar. All of them served into the 1950s with the last engine retiring in 1957.


Class T-36 (Locobase 8749)

Data from SP Menke All Time Steam Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works numbers were 26684-26686 in October 1903.

Manchester was a small builder that was absorbed by the American Locomotive Company at about the same time as it produced this trio of mixed-traffic Ten-wheelers for the EP & SW. When that railway came under the Southern Pacific, they were given the numbers shown in the specs.

The first retired in 1934, but the last lingered until 1947.


Class T-37 (Locobase 8750)

Data from SP Menke All Time Steam Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Although delivered to the EP & SW only a year after the Manchester trio, these were bigger engines with a different mission. The taller drivers bespoke a strictly passenger role and stretched the steam provided by a smallish boiler to the larger cylinders. A wide grate now lay over the drivers, not between them. Once in service for a few years, the design was revised by the installation of a superheater; it's this manifestation that's shown in the specs.

Given that the two carried on into the early 1950s, they were well-suited to fill a niche.


Class T-40 (Locobase 8751)

Data from the SP 7 - 1951 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Roster information from http://www.urbaneagle.com/nco/nco-loco-roster.html, accessed 3 September 2007.

This was a single rebuilding project in which Sacramento shops took a T-32 and modified with superheater and other goodies. According to the Espee railfan site -- http://espee.railfan.net/sp_steam_t-40.html, accessed 16 Sept 2007 -- the T-40 remained unique as plans to upgrade other members of the class were not carried out. On the other hand, the T-32s shown in the plan books had all the same dimensions and areas, so perhaps only one was dubbed T-40?


Class T-44 (Locobase 8698)

Data from the SP 7 - 1951 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works numbers were 31445 in January 1907

This little Ten-wheeler from Baldwin had a small grate and firebox for the boiler it was expected to heat. But it must have satisfied requirements because it survived the transformation of the N-C-O into a standard-gauge branch of the SP in 1926-29 and only went out of service in 1955. At that point, it went on display in Carson City, NV and later in Sparks, NV.


Class T-44 / 10 (Locobase 8701)

Data from SP Menke All Time Steam Locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also the Carson & Colorado account of the 18's survival at https://carsoncolorado.com/history-of-18/, last accessed 5 December 2016, and David Lustig, "Southern Pacific slim returns", Trains, January 2017, p. 2016. Roster information from http://www.urbaneagle.com/nco/nco-loco-roster.html, accessed 3 September 2007. Works numbers were 34528 in April 1910 and 37394-37395 in December 1911.

Maintaining the same power dimensions as found in the earlier N-C-O 4-6-0s, this trio had fewer, but longer tubes and a slightly larger firebox. Both 10 & 11 were sold off to the narrow-gauge Pacific Coast Railway in 1929 after the N-C-O's slim alignment had been widened to standard gauge. 111 was scrapped in 1948, but Oahu Railway & Land Company bought 112 and operated it until 1950.

12 was renumbered 18 and put to work on the SP's Carson & Colorado. From 1926 to 1938, the 18 worked the branch between Mina, Nev and Keeler, Cal. When the SP closed the Mina Branch, the 18 moved to serving the 73 mile (118 km) Laws-Keeler line. When the SP finally dieselized that line in 1954, the 18 was retired.

A year later, Anna Kelley's campaign to After its retirement in 1955, it was put on display in Independence's Dehy Park. Decades later in 2010, the C&C began restoring the 18. See the YouTube video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WR-EmAL_Wmo, which features a time-lapse summary of the six-year effort. The 18 ran again under her own steam on 15 October 2016.


Class T-44 / 9 (Locobase 8699)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 34, p. 1 and Volume 40, p. 20. See also the SP 7 - 1951 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Roster information from http://www.urbaneagle.com/nco/nco-loco-roster.html, accessed 3 September 2007. Works numbers were 34035 in November 1909, 34528 in April 1910, 37394-37395 in December 1911.

Baldwin's next group of Ten-wheelers for the N-C-O repeated the power dimensions, but put more weight on the wheels. Even so, a "Hereafter" note in the 1911 specs required the builder to "decrease the number of plates in the engine truck springs to make them suitable for the weight carried on the truck".

9 and 12 were taken over by the Southern Pacific in May 1928 as their 9 and 18. 9 was later displayed in Laws, CA at the Laws Railroad Museum. 18 was put on display in Independence, Calif in 1955.

Number 10-11 ran for the narrow-gauge SP until it was sold to the Pacific Coast Railroad. The PCR was abandoned in 1941. Both the 10 and 11 were sold to the Oahu Railway, 11 going first in January 1942. When that engine -- renumbered 111 -- was scrapped in 1948, the 10 replaced it and was renumbered 110. 110 was scrapped in 1950.


Class T-45 - rebuilt from M-44 (Locobase 8761)

Data from SP Menke All Time Steam Locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.


Class T-45 / 22 (Locobase 8702)

Data from SP Menke All Time Steam Locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.


Class T-51 / 14 (Locobase 8700)

Data from SP Menke All Time Steam Locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

These three engines (and a fourth) were originally delivered to the South Pacific Coast in the late 1880s. They had slightly larger boilers at that point and 11 more tubes than in the form shown in the Southern Pacific diagram used for this entry.


Class T-56 (Locobase 8752)

Data from SP Menke All Time Steam Locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works number was 52884.

Locobase is a little surprised that so small a locomotive would have been built as late as it was by a major builder. The SD & S was merged with the San Diego & Arizona in 1917 and this engine, then numbered 23, became 12 in 1920. It later served under that number for both the Mexicali & Golfo and the Southern Pacific before being scrapped in October 1947.

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class103 / T-43105 / T-57109 / T-57111 / T-46130 / T-47 & T-48
Locobase ID8177 8178 8180 8181 8182
RailroadNorthwestern Pacific (SP)Northwestern Pacific (SP)California Northwestern (SP)Northwestern Pacific (SP)Northwestern Pacific (SP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class22146
Road Numbers103-104105-106109111-114130-135
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built22146
BuilderRichmondAlco-RichmondBurnham, Williams & CoAlco-SchenectadyAlco
Year19011901190019081910
Valve GearWalschaertWalschaertStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase12.33'11.75'12'12'14.83'
Engine Wheelbase22.67'21.92'23.12'22.58'25.92'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.54 0.54 0.52 0.53 0.57
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers92260 lbs108000 lbs105150 lbs109600 lbs130400 lbs
Engine Weight120260 lbs134000 lbs130300 lbs137800 lbs173000 lbs
Tender Light Weight
Total Engine and Tender Weight
Tender Water Capacity
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)51 lb/yard60 lb/yard58 lb/yard61 lb/yard72 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter57"57"57"57"63"
Boiler Pressure180 psi180 psi180 psi180 psi200 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)18" x 24"19" x 26"19" x 26"19" x 26"20" x 28"
Tractive Effort20872 lbs25194 lbs25194 lbs25194 lbs30222 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.42 4.29 4.17 4.35 4.31
Heating Ability
Firebox Area137 sq. ft144 sq. ft150 sq. ft158 sq. ft173.50 sq. ft
Grate Area23 sq. ft24.25 sq. ft24.75 sq. ft25 sq. ft30.20 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1591 sq. ft1874 sq. ft1887 sq. ft1923 sq. ft2762 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface1591 sq. ft1874 sq. ft1887 sq. ft1923 sq. ft2762 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume225.08219.64221.16225.38271.29
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation41404365445545006040
Same as above plus superheater percentage41404365445545006040
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area2466025920270002844034700
Power L155065199528554377486
Power MT394.71318.38332.42328.10379.69

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class136 / T-49139 / T-51142 / T-51160/180 /T-57178
Locobase ID8184 8185 8191 8189 8187
RailroadNorthwestern Pacific (SP)Northwestern Pacific (SP)Northwestern Pacific (SP)Northwestern Pacific (SP)Northwestern Pacific (SP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class33221
Road Numbers136-138139-141142-143160-161/180-181178
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built33221
BuilderAlcoAlcoBaldwinAlcoBurnham, Williams & Co
Year19141914192219141906
Valve GearStephensonStephensonWalschaertWalschaertWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase14.83'14.83'14.83'14.83'12.67'
Engine Wheelbase25.92'25.92'25.92'26'24.71'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.57 0.57 0.57 0.57 0.51
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)55.97'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers135500 lbs137720 lbs137720 lbs148500 lbs141400 lbs
Engine Weight180000 lbs181670 lbs181670 lbs196500 lbs169800 lbs
Tender Light Weight142000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight323670 lbs
Tender Water Capacity7000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)2940 gals gals gals
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)75 lb/yard77 lb/yard77 lb/yard83 lb/yard79 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter63"63"63"57"63"
Boiler Pressure200 psi200 psi200 psi200 psi200 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)20" x 28"20" x 28"20" x 28"21" x 28"21" x 28"
Tractive Effort30222 lbs30222 lbs30222 lbs36827 lbs33320 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.48 4.56 4.56 4.03 4.24
Heating Ability
Firebox Area175 sq. ft174 sq. ft174 sq. ft178 sq. ft192 sq. ft
Grate Area28.70 sq. ft28.70 sq. ft28.70 sq. ft50.50 sq. ft35 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface2627 sq. ft2032 sq. ft2032 sq. ft2282 sq. ft1873 sq. ft
Superheating Surface408 sq. ft408 sq. ft494 sq. ft461 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface2627 sq. ft2440 sq. ft2440 sq. ft2776 sq. ft2334 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume258.03199.59199.59203.30166.86
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation574057405740101007000
Same as above plus superheater percentage574067166716119188400
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area3500040716407164200846080
Power L1722313560135601289513063
Power MT352.56651.20651.20574.31611.01

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class178517918182 / T-5720 / T-44
Locobase ID11122 8188 8174 8190 8179
RailroadCentral Pacific (SP)Las Vegas & Tonopah (SP)North Pacific Coast (SP)Northwestern Pacific (SP)California Northwestern (SP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class11134
Road Numbers178517918/145/95182-18420, 1, 22-23/110, 109, 107-108
GaugeStdStd3'StdStd
Number Built11134
BuilderSchenectadyAlcoBrooksBaldwinBurnham, Williams & Co
Year18901906190019221900
Valve GearStephensonWalschaertStephensonWalschaertWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase12.17'14.83'10.67'14.83'12'
Engine Wheelbase22.67'25.75'20.33'26'23.12'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.54 0.58 0.52 0.57 0.52
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)47.54'56.56'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers99500 lbs142480 lbs61300 lbs148500 lbs110000 lbs
Engine Weight130300 lbs189280 lbs79400 lbs196500 lbs136300 lbs
Tender Light Weight139000 lbs70000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight335500 lbs206300 lbs
Tender Water Capacity4000 gals7000 gals3500 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)2940 gals gals
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)55 lb/yard79 lb/yard34 lb/yard83 lb/yard61 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter69"63"55"57"57"
Boiler Pressure180 psi200 psi170 psi200 psi180 psi
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke)20" x 26"20" x 28"16" x 22"21" x 28"19" x 26"
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke)29" x 26" (1)
Tractive Effort15628 lbs30222 lbs14797 lbs36827 lbs25194 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 6.37 4.71 4.14 4.03 4.37
Heating Ability
Firebox Area137.10 sq. ft174 sq. ft110.60 sq. ft178 sq. ft153.50 sq. ft
Grate Area28.50 sq. ft50 sq. ft16 sq. ft50.50 sq. ft24.75 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1742 sq. ft2344 sq. ft1081 sq. ft2282 sq. ft1904 sq. ft
Superheating Surface549 sq. ft494 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface1742 sq. ft2893 sq. ft1081 sq. ft2776 sq. ft1904 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume368.53230.23211.15203.30223.16
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation5130100002720101004455
Same as above plus superheater percentage5130119002720119184455
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area2467841412188024200827630
Power L15056168214974128955354
Power MT336.08780.82536.66574.31321.91

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class20/T-57201 / T-3821 / 102222 / 11
Locobase ID7276 7248 7274 11606 7275
RailroadSan Diego & Arizona (SP)San Antonio & Aransas Pass (SP)San Diego & Southeastern (SP)South PacificSan Diego & Southeastern (SP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class18111
Road Numbers20201-208 / 369-376102222 / 11
GaugeStdStdStd3'Std
Number Built8111
BuilderSD&ABurnham, Williams & CoSchenectadyBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoRogers
Year19191907188718891881
Valve GearWalschaertStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase12.67'15'15.83'12.50'14'
Engine Wheelbase24'23.17'24'21.83'23.83'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.53 0.65 0.66 0.57 0.59
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)49.37'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers135000 lbs93500 lbs73400 lbs73400 lbs
Engine Weight162000 lbs126000 lbs97600 lbs97600 lbs
Tender Light Weight102360 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight228360 lbs
Tender Water Capacity5000 gals2000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)1950 gals gals gals gals
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)75 lb/yard52 lb/yard41 lb/yard041 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter63"62"57"48"57"
Boiler Pressure190 psi180 psi150 psi130 psi150 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)21" x 28"19" x 24"18" x 24"16" x 20"18" x 24"
Tractive Effort31654 lbs21381 lbs17394 lbs11787 lbs17394 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.26 4.37 4.22 4.22
Heating Ability
Firebox Area192 sq. ft133 sq. ft150 sq. ft144 sq. ft
Grate Area34.90 sq. ft17 sq. ft16.50 sq. ft13.80 sq. ft16.40 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1399 sq. ft1615 sq. ft1425 sq. ft1470 sq. ft
Superheating Surface402 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface1801 sq. ft1615 sq. ft1425 sq. ft01470 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume124.64205.06201.60207.96
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation66313060247517942460
Same as above plus superheater percentage80903060247517942460
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area445062394022500021600
Power L1106235385438504415
Power MT520.44380.92395.12397.82

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class320 / T-394 / T-52, T-585277 / T-58
Locobase ID7249 8186 7701 12673 7277
RailroadSan Antonio & Aransas Pass (SP)Las Vegas & Tonopah (SP)Florence & Cripple Creek (SP)Nevada-California-Oregon (SP)Las Vegas & Tonopah (SP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class13421
Road Numbers320 / 3004-11 / 170-17222-237-87 / 24
GaugeStdStd3'3'Std
Number Built1342
BuilderBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoSchenectadyBurnham, Williams & CoSP
Year19071907189919031921
Valve GearWalschaertStephensonStephensonStephensonWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase15'14.33' 9.75'9'14.33'
Engine Wheelbase26.92'25.92'18.17'18.25'25.92'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.56 0.55 0.54 0.49 0.55
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)41.75'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers110900 lbs142000 lbs69000 lbs58000 lbs143300 lbs
Engine Weight150000 lbs186750 lbs85000 lbs74000 lbs189800 lbs
Tender Light Weight105200 lbs115000 lbs57600 lbs62000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight255200 lbs301750 lbs142600 lbs136000 lbs
Tender Water Capacity5000 gals6000 gals2500 gals3000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)2000 gals3000 gals7 tons tons tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)62 lb/yard79 lb/yard38 lb/yard32 lb/yard80 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter56"57"42"44"57"
Boiler Pressure200 psi190 psi180 psi160 psi200 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)18" x 26"21" x 26"16" x 20"15" x 18"21" x 26"
Tractive Effort25573 lbs32487 lbs18651 lbs12518 lbs34197 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.34 4.37 3.70 4.63 4.19
Heating Ability
Firebox Area156 sq. ft140.60 sq. ft86.88 sq. ft78.40 sq. ft145 sq. ft
Grate Area20.70 sq. ft42.50 sq. ft14.08 sq. ft11.93 sq. ft42.50 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface2401 sq. ft2599 sq. ft1124 sq. ft992 sq. ft1606 sq. ft
Superheating Surface478 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface2401 sq. ft2599 sq. ft1124 sq. ft992 sq. ft2084 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume313.54249.36241.50269.45154.08
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation41408075253419098500
Same as above plus superheater percentage414080752534190910455
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area3120026714156381254435670
Power L1775457184219441112091
Power MT462.43266.32404.40503.00558.05

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class9 / T-58AlamogordoDB / T-2DC / T-1 / T-25DF - 57"" / T-6
Locobase ID7278 12258 3196 3155 8736
RailroadLas Vegas & Tonopah (SP)El Paso & Northeastern (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class3314359
Road Numbers9-111-3 / 122-124 / 109-1111794-1807 / 2221-22341808-51 / 2235-22731762-64, 68-69, 73-74 + 2
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built314359
BuilderSPBurnham, Williams & CoCookeCookeSP
Year19211898189318951895
Valve GearWalschaertStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase14.33'15'12.17'12.17'12'
Engine Wheelbase25.92'26'22.83'22.67'25.42'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.55 0.58 0.53 0.54 0.47
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)47.80'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers143300 lbs102000 lbs104900 lbs112050 lbs78700 lbs
Engine Weight189800 lbs142000 lbs130750 lbs142350 lbs105100 lbs
Tender Light Weight90000 lbs81000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight232000 lbs223350 lbs
Tender Water Capacity4500 gals4000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)12 tons tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)80 lb/yard57 lb/yard58 lb/yard62 lb/yard44 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter63"63"63"63"57"
Boiler Pressure200 psi180 psi160 psi180 psi135 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)21" x 26"19" x 26"19" x 24"20" x 26"18" x 30"
Tractive Effort30940 lbs22795 lbs18703 lbs25257 lbs19568 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.63 4.47 5.61 4.44 4.02
Heating Ability
Firebox Area145 sq. ft173 sq. ft141 sq. ft147 sq. ft136 sq. ft
Grate Area42.50 sq. ft23.40 sq. ft28 sq. ft28 sq. ft24 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1606 sq. ft1921 sq. ft1622 sq. ft1884 sq. ft1303 sq. ft
Superheating Surface478 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface2084 sq. ft1921 sq. ft1622 sq. ft1884 sq. ft1303 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume154.08225.15205.95199.28147.47
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation85004212448050403240
Same as above plus superheater percentage104554212448050403240
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area3567031140225602646018360
Power L1133646171496452362878
Power MT616.80400.14312.98309.06241.86

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassDF - 63"" / T-6DH / T-8aDI / T-9DJ / T-10DW
Locobase ID8737 8738 8739 8740 12680
RailroadSouthern Pacific (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class1310202010
Road Numbers1746-1755 / 2174-21831694-1713 / 2154-21731726-1745 / 2134-21532301-2310
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built1310202010
BuilderSPSchenectadySchenectadyRhode IslandBurnham, Williams & Co
Year18951895189518951903
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase12'11'11'14.42'13.67'
Engine Wheelbase25.42'20.83'20.83'24.67'25'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.47 0.53 0.53 0.58 0.55
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers77650 lbs87500 lbs83100 lbs85700 lbs144000 lbs
Engine Weight108400 lbs106200 lbs101500 lbs112300 lbs185000 lbs
Tender Light Weight120000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight305000 lbs
Tender Water Capacity6000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)43 lb/yard49 lb/yard46 lb/yard48 lb/yard80 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter63"57"56"57"63"
Boiler Pressure135 psi160 psi160 psi160 psi210 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)18" x 30"18" x 24"18" x 24"18" x 24"21" x 28"
Tractive Effort17704 lbs18553 lbs18885 lbs18553 lbs34986 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.39 4.72 4.40 4.62 4.12
Heating Ability
Firebox Area136 sq. ft119 sq. ft119 sq. ft142 sq. ft171.20 sq. ft
Grate Area24 sq. ft24.50 sq. ft27.40 sq. ft19 sq. ft49.50 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1303 sq. ft1467 sq. ft1402 sq. ft1343 sq. ft2470 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface1303 sq. ft1467 sq. ft1402 sq. ft1343 sq. ft2470 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume147.47207.54198.34190.00220.05
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation324039204384304010395
Same as above plus superheater percentage324039204384304010395
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area1836019040190402272035952
Power L131814434421944156534
Power MT270.94335.15335.79340.73300.10

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassDZ-1 / T-69 / T-26Eureka / T-55Skaggs / T-57T-16T-22
Locobase ID12559 8176 8175 11131 8744
RailroadSouthern Pacific (SP)San Francisco & North Pacific (SP)San Francisco & North Pacific (SP)Texas & New Orleans (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class61111
Road Numbers2283-230015 / 102101642-6562001
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built61111
BuilderBurnham, Williams & CoGrantRogersSchenectadyMcKay & Aldus
Year19011888188918901868
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase13.67'13.50'13.33'13.83'11'
Engine Wheelbase25'24.50'23.92'24'21.17'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.55 0.55 0.56 0.58 0.52
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)45.75'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers135000 lbs78000 lbs73100 lbs73000 lbs93700 lbs
Engine Weight175000 lbs102000 lbs94400 lbs95000 lbs117500 lbs
Tender Light Weight
Total Engine and Tender Weight
Tender Water Capacity6000 gals3400 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)75 lb/yard43 lb/yard41 lb/yard41 lb/yard52 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter69"55"57"55"57"
Boiler Pressure200 psi140 psi140 psi140 psi160 psi
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke)15.5" x 28"18" x 24"16" x 24"18" x 24"18" x 24"
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke)26" x 28" (2)
Tractive Effort24456 lbs16824 lbs12827 lbs16824 lbs18553 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 5.52 4.64 5.70 4.34 5.05
Heating Ability
Firebox Area171.20 sq. ft108 sq. ft110 sq. ft125.90 sq. ft128 sq. ft
Grate Area49.50 sq. ft16.90 sq. ft16 sq. ft17.30 sq. ft25 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface2498 sq. ft1523 sq. ft1342 sq. ft1469 sq. ft1494 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface2498 sq. ft1523 sq. ft1342 sq. ft1469 sq. ft1494 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume408.50215.46240.28207.82211.36
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation99002366224024224000
Same as above plus superheater percentage99002366224024224000
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area3424015120154001762620480
Power L144833745450638104589
Power MT219.63317.55407.69345.19323.92

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassT-23T-25T-26T-27T-28
Locobase ID8745 4134 8746 8674 4212
RailroadSouthern Pacific (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)Texas & New Orleans (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class108181054
Road Numbers2301-23102274-22812283-2300377-3862311-2352, 388-399
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built81054
BuilderSPCookeSPseveralBurnham, Williams & Co
Year1901192318971907
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase13.67'13.67'13.67'12.17'13.83'
Engine Wheelbase25'24.50'25'22.67'25.83'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.55 0.56 0.55 0.54 0.54
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)52.17'58.02'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)52800 lbs37330 lbs
Weight on Drivers156000 lbs134000 lbs155400 lbs112000 lbs162800 lbs
Engine Weight196200 lbs173000 lbs198000 lbs142350 lbs207000 lbs
Tender Light Weight142000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight349000 lbs
Tender Water Capacity7000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)2940 gals
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)87 lb/yard74 lb/yard86 lb/yard62 lb/yard90 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter63"69"69"63.50"63"
Boiler Pressure210 psi200 psi200 psi180 psi190 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)21" x 28"20" x 28"21" x 28"20" x 26"22" x 28"
Tractive Effort34986 lbs27594 lbs30423 lbs25058 lbs34740 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.46 4.86 5.11 4.47 4.69
Heating Ability
Firebox Area158 sq. ft202 sq. ft191 sq. ft162 sq. ft206 sq. ft
Grate Area49.30 sq. ft30.22 sq. ft32.60 sq. ft28 sq. ft32.10 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1981 sq. ft2562 sq. ft1911 sq. ft1898 sq. ft2994 sq. ft
Superheating Surface384 sq. ft369 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface2365 sq. ft2562 sq. ft2280 sq. ft1898 sq. ft2994 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume176.49251.64170.25200.76243.04
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation103536044652050406099
Same as above plus superheater percentage120096044756350406099
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area3848940400443122916039140
Power L11223280691267854576517
Power MT518.59398.26539.58322.25264.76

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassT-28 - superheatedT-28 T&NO - superheatedT-3T-31T-32
Locobase ID8672 8673 8735 3164 8747
RailroadSouthern Pacific (SP)Texas & New Orleans (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class421271022
Road Numbers2311-2352388-3992214-22202353-23622363-2384
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built71022
BuilderSPT&NOSchenectadyBaldwinseveral
Year19131913189519121913
Valve GearStephensonWalschaertStephensonWalschaertWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase13.83'13.83'12.18'13.83'13.83'
Engine Wheelbase25.83'25.83'22.67'25.83'25.83'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.54 0.54 0.54 0.54 0.54
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)58.02'47.80'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)55500 lbs55997 lbs55500 lbs62800 lbs
Weight on Drivers162000 lbs162680 lbs113000 lbs162000 lbs173900 lbs
Engine Weight208000 lbs206720 lbs142600 lbs208000 lbs218500 lbs
Tender Light Weight142000 lbs89900 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight350000 lbs297900 lbs
Tender Water Capacity7000 gals12000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)2940 gals gals gals4000 gals gals
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)90 lb/yard90 lb/yard63 lb/yard90 lb/yard97 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter63"69"69"63"69"
Boiler Pressure210 psi210 psi180 psi210 psi210 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)22" x 28"22" x 28"20" x 26"22" x 28"23" x 28"
Tractive Effort38397 lbs35058 lbs23061 lbs38397 lbs38318 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.22 4.64 4.90 4.22 4.54
Heating Ability
Firebox Area230 sq. ft206 sq. ft147 sq. ft230 sq. ft230 sq. ft
Grate Area32.10 sq. ft32.10 sq. ft28 sq. ft32 sq. ft32 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface2427 sq. ft2324 sq. ft1884 sq. ft2427 sq. ft2427 sq. ft
Superheating Surface467 sq. ft464 sq. ft467 sq. ft467 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface2894 sq. ft2788 sq. ft1884 sq. ft2894 sq. ft2894 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume197.01188.65199.28197.01180.25
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation67416741504067206720
Same as above plus superheater percentage78207887504077957795
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area5602850614264605602856028
Power L1139251476257351392513954
Power MT568.51600.16335.67568.51530.71

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassT-36T-37T-40T-44T-44 / 10
Locobase ID8749 8750 8751 8698 8701
RailroadEl Paso & Southwestern (SP)El Paso & Southwestern (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)Nevada-California-Oregon (SP)Nevada-California-Oregon (SP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class33113
Road Numbers2102-21042105-210623714 / 810-12
GaugeStdStdStd3'3'
Number Built3313
BuilderAlco-ManchesterAlco-Rhode IslandSPBurnham, Williams & CoBaldwin
Year19021903192819071910
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase14.83'13'13.83' 9.02'9'
Engine Wheelbase25.83'24.60'25.83'18.28'18.24'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.57 0.53 0.54 0.49 0.49
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)68800 lbs
Weight on Drivers118000 lbs146000 lbs197300 lbs62000 lbs68000 lbs
Engine Weight153000 lbs187100 lbs242500 lbs81000 lbs87150 lbs
Tender Light Weight
Total Engine and Tender Weight
Tender Water Capacity
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)66 lb/yard81 lb/yard110 lb/yard34 lb/yard38 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter63"70"69"44"44"
Boiler Pressure190 psi175 psi210 psi180 psi180 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)20" x 26"24" x 28"23" x 28"16" x 20"16" x 20"
Tractive Effort26660 lbs34272 lbs38318 lbs17804 lbs17804 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.43 4.26 5.15 3.48 3.82
Heating Ability
Firebox Area194 sq. ft153 sq. ft230 sq. ft70 sq. ft70 sq. ft
Grate Area30.90 sq. ft48.90 sq. ft32 sq. ft11.80 sq. ft11.80 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface2132 sq. ft2107 sq. ft2427 sq. ft1210 sq. ft1286 sq. ft
Superheating Surface390 sq. ft467 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface2132 sq. ft2497 sq. ft2894 sq. ft1210 sq. ft1286 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume225.52143.72180.25259.98276.31
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation58718558672021242124
Same as above plus superheater percentage58719927779521242124
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area3686031059560281260012600
Power L1654688881395444244640
Power MT366.90402.63467.76471.93451.30

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassT-44 / 9T-45 - rebuilt from M-44T-45 / 22T-51 / 14T-56
Locobase ID8699 8761 8702 8700 8752
RailroadNevada-California-Oregon (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)Southern Pacific (SP)San Diego & Southeastern (SP)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte4-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-04-6-0
Number in Class41131
Road Numbers9-121214, 16-1723 / 12
Gauge3'3'3'3'Std
Number Built4111
BuilderBaldwinSPAlco-Pittsburgh
Year19091921188919211913
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase 9.02'12.12'12.50'12.50'14'
Engine Wheelbase18.25'21.29'21.83'21.83'24.25'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.49 0.57 0.57 0.57 0.58
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)47.08'41.50'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)19300 lbs24300 lbs
Weight on Drivers70750 lbs56700 lbs71000 lbs68200 lbs95400 lbs
Engine Weight87150 lbs73700 lbs89400 lbs83900 lbs123400 lbs
Tender Light Weight70000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight157150 lbs
Tender Water Capacity3500 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)1600 gals gals gals gals gals
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)39 lb/yard32 lb/yard39 lb/yard38 lb/yard53 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter44"45"42"51"57"
Boiler Pressure180 psi140 psi180 psi145 psi170 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)16" x 20"14.5" x 18"16" x 20"16" x 20"18" x 24"
Tractive Effort17804 lbs10008 lbs18651 lbs12373 lbs19713 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.97 5.67 3.81 5.51 4.84
Heating Ability
Firebox Area87 sq. ft65 sq. ft80 sq. ft85 sq. ft165 sq. ft
Grate Area11.90 sq. ft 8.70 sq. ft14.40 sq. ft14.06 sq. ft17 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1227 sq. ft862 sq. ft1069 sq. ft823 sq. ft1528 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface1227 sq. ft862 sq. ft1069 sq. ft823 sq. ft1528 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume263.63250.57229.68176.83216.17
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation21421218259220392890
Same as above plus superheater percentage21421218259220392890
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area156609100144001232528050
Power L147143623397733055376
Power MT440.67422.61370.47320.51372.71

Photos

Reference


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